39 found
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  1.  18
    Why Religion Deserves a Place in Secular Medicine.Nigel Biggar - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (3):229-233.
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  2.  4
    In Defence of War.Nigel Biggar - 2015 - New Blackfriars 96 (1062):192-205.
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  3.  35
    Behaving in Public: How to Do Christian Ethics.Nigel Biggar - 2011 - W.B. Eerdmans Pub. Co..
    Integrity, not distinctiveness -- Tense consensus -- Which public? -- Can a theological argument behave? -- So, what is the church good for? -- Conclusion: the via media: a Barthian Thomism.
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  4. Aiming to Kill: The Ethics of Suicide and Euthanasia.Nigel Biggar, Arthur Dyck, Neil M. Gorsuch & John Keown - 2007 - Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (3):527-555.
    During the past four decades, the Netherlands played a leading role in the debate about euthanasia and assisted suicide. Despite the claim that other countries would soon follow the Dutch legalization of euthanasia, only Belgium and the American state of Oregon did. In many countries, intense discussions took place. This article discusses some major contributions to the discussion about euthanasia and assisted suicide as written by Nigel Biggar, Arthur J. Dyck, Neil M. Gorsuch, and John Keown. They share a concern (...)
     
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  5. Aiming to Kill: The Ethics of Suicide and Euthanasia.Nigel Biggar - 2004 - Pilgrim Press.
    1. The traditional position and the pressures for change. The Western legal tradition -- The Christian ethical hinterland -- The exceptional value of human life -- The justification of taking human life -- Suicide -- Christian ethics, assisted suicide, and voluntary euthanasia -- The cultural pressures for change -- 2. The value of human life -- 3. The morality of acts of killing -- 4. Slippery slopes.
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  6.  10
    In Defence of War.Nigel Biggar - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    Against the domination of moral deliberation by rights-talk In Defence of War asserts that belligerency can be morally justified, even while it is tragic and morally flawed. Recovering the early Christian tradition of just war thinking, Nigel Biggar argues in favour of aggressive war in punishment of grave injustice.
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  7. Not Translation, but Conversation: Theology in Public Debate About Euthanasia.Nigel Biggar - 2009 - In Nigel Biggar & Linda Hogan (eds.), Religious Voices in Public Places. Oxford University Press.
     
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  8.  7
    A Christian View of Humanitarian Intervention.Nigel Biggar - 2019 - Ethics and International Affairs 33 (1):19-28.
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  9.  46
    Forgiving Enemies in Ireland.Nigel Biggar - 2008 - Journal of Religious Ethics 36 (4):559-579.
    The Peace Process in Northern Ireland is about to reach another milestone: the Consultative Group on the Past is due to publish a report in the autumn of 2008 on "the best way to deal with the legacy of the past in Northern Ireland" and to support the building of "a shared future." It is timely therefore to think again—and further—about what political expression forgiveness might find, using the concrete case of Northern Ireland today as grist for our conceptual mill. (...)
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  10.  2
    Anglican Establishment: How is It Liberal?Nigel Biggar - 2020 - Studies in Christian Ethics 33 (2):205-214.
    This article argues that the kind of religious establishment that currently obtains in England is sufficiently liberal in the sense that it accommodates rights to religious freedom and is compatible with political equality. What is more, insofar as it expresses a Christian anthropology, established Anglicanism can generate the ‘thick’ set of virtues necessary to make citizens capable of respecting liberal rights. In the course of defending its thesis, the argument disputes John Rawls’s description of the ‘overlapping consensus’ as one that (...)
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  11.  10
    Individual Rights Versus Common Security? Christian Moral Reasoning About Torture.Nigel Biggar - 2014 - Studies in Christian Ethics 27 (1):3-20.
    Should a Christian ethic endorse an individual’s right against torture? If so, how should its reasoning take into account considerations of common security? To answer these questions, this article first compares the early Christian ‘just war’ tradition’s pre-liberal reasoning about the ethics of harming with that of the liberal philosopher, David Rodin. It then deploys the fruits of this comparison—especially the contingency of a right against harm , and the distinction between natural moral rights and positive legal ones—in an examination (...)
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  12.  10
    Religious Voices in Public Places.Nigel Biggar & Linda Hogan (eds.) - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    Drawing on political philosophy and theology, theory and practice, this essay collection tackles the complex questions arising from the interface of religion and public life. Includes critical analyses of theorists Rawls, Stout and Habermas, and discussion of key issues such as religious education and human rights.
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  13.  25
    ‘God’ in Public Reason.Nigel Biggar - 2006 - Studies in Christian Ethics 19 (1):9-19.
    The recent suicide bombings in London by young Islamists should remind Christian theologians that they are committed to a liberal polity of some kind. But is a genuinely theological liberalism possible? Many still think that public reason in a liberal polity must be universally accessible and therefore ‘secular’; and that it requires those with religious convictions to strip their public speech of theology. Such is the position taken by Jürgen Habermas in a recent newspaper interview. But is Habermas correct to (...)
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  14.  9
    A Case for Casuistry in the Church.Nigel Biggar - 1989 - Modern Theology 6 (1):29-51.
  15.  51
    Saving the “Secular”: The Public Vocation of Moral Theology 1.Nigel Biggar - 2009 - Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (1):159-178.
    The London suicide bombings of July 7, 2005 were partly the revolt of moral earnestness against a liberal society that, enchanted by the fantasy of rationalist anthropology, surrenders its passionate members to a degrading consumerism. The "humane" liberalism variously espoused by Jürgen Habermas, John Rawls, and Jeffrey Stout offers a dignifying alternative; but it is fragile, and each of its proponents looks for allies among certain kinds of religious believer. Stanley Hauerwas, however, counsels Christians against cooperation. On the one hand, (...)
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  16. Book Review: John Kelsay, Arguing the Just War in Islam (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2007). 253 Pp. £16.95/Us$24.95 (Hb), ISBN 978—0—674— 02639—1.Nigel Biggar - 2009 - Studies in Christian Ethics 22 (1):123-125.
  17.  19
    Christian Public Reasoning in the United Kingdom: Apologetic, Casuistical, and Rhetorically Discriminate.Nigel Biggar - 2012 - Studies in Christian Ethics 25 (2):141-147.
    Since the 1960s Christian ethics in Britain has become stronger, more theological, and more Protestant, so that its moral intelligence is now much more fully informed by the full range of theological premises. In the future, however, Christian ethics needs to make up certain recent losses: to re-engage with moral philosophy, in order to rebut the glib dismissal of religious ethics by popularising atheists; to read less philosophy and more history, in order to become plausible to public policy-makers; and to (...)
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  18.  11
    Compromise: What Makes It Bad?Nigel Biggar - 2018 - Studies in Christian Ethics 31 (1):34-48.
    This article considers what makes a compromise bad. First, it defines a compromise as a decision involving a loss of good, which should therefore be accompanied by ‘agent-regret’. Regret, however, is not moral guilt. Pace proponents of ‘dirty hands’, a morally right compromise cannot retain elements of moral wrongness. Second, the article proceeds to elaborate the features of bad compromise further in terms of common moral sense: the preference of less rather than more of a single good; the preference of (...)
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  19.  30
    Evolutionary Biology, 'Enlightened' Anthropological Narratives, and Social Morality: A View From Christian Ethics.Nigel Biggar - 2013 - Studies in Christian Ethics 26 (2):152-157.
    The natural evolution of ethics is commonly understood in terms of the development from the selfish struggle to survive, via prudent cooperation, to altruism. However, cooperation that is prudent in the sense of serving basically selfish interests is not really altruistic. Besides, Christian ethics should not identify morality with absolutely disinterested altruism. Self-interest is only selfish when it is disproportionate or unfair; otherwise it is morally legitimate. Therefore the natural evolution of ethics is better understood as the gradual diversification of (...)
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  20. In Defence of War.Nigel Biggar - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    Against the domination of moral deliberation by rights-talk In Defence of War asserts that belligerency can be morally justified, even while it is tragic and morally flawed. Recovering the early Christian tradition of just war thinking, Nigel Biggar argues in favour of aggressive war in punishment of grave injustice.
     
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  21.  10
    In Response.Nigel Biggar - 2015 - Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (3):328-342.
    The author of In Defence of War responds to each commentator in turn, discussing the following issues, among others: the Christian specification of just war, its punitive form, the virtue of callousness, love for the enemy, the intention to kill, proportionality, empire, international law, human fatedness, and the First World War.
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  22.  6
    Just War and International Law: A Response to Mary Ellen O’Connell.Nigel Biggar - 2015 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 35 (2):53-62.
    The following remarks were prepared as a response to Mary Ellen O'Connell's plenary address, "The Just War Tradition and International Law against War: The Myth of Discordant Doctrines," at the 2015 annual meeting of the Society of Christian Ethics. O'Connell's essay appears in this issue of the Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics. After noting some points of agreement, the response discusses five main issues: the moral complexity of "peace," the consonance of a peremptory norm against aggression with just (...)
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  23.  20
    Melting the Icepacks of Enmity: Forgiveness and Reconciliation in Northern Ireland.Nigel Biggar - 2011 - Studies in Christian Ethics 24 (2):199-209.
    The virtue of forgiveness is controversial. Christianity’s affirmation of it is unusually pronounced. Nevertheless, common experience teaches that self-preservation requires the moderation of resentment; and Christian anthropology, self-reflection and history teach that compassion for perpetrators requires it too. This inner, psychological work of forgiveness is unilateral and unconditional, and I call it ‘forgiveness as compassion’. Some of the work of forgiveness is relational, however, and this should be reciprocal and conditional, refusing to open the door to reconciliation before repentance is (...)
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  24.  28
    Nicholas Wolterstorff, Justice: Rights and Wrongs.Nigel Biggar - 2010 - Studies in Christian Ethics 23 (2):130-137.
    This response to Justice, Rights and Wrongs argues that Wolterstorff’s defence of rights attaching to human subjects withstands Oliver O’Donovan’s critique; that the concept of multiple rights is compatible with the affirmation of a larger moral order; that there is a problem with rights thought to be determined in advance of moral deliberation; that love should not only recognize rights (with Wolterstorff) but should react to their violation with retribution (against Wolterstorff); that a biblical and theological case can be made (...)
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  25.  29
    Peace and Justice: A Limited Reconciliation. [REVIEW]Nigel Biggar - 2002 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 5 (2):167-179.
    This paper aims to relax the tension between the political requirements of making peace and the moral demands of doing justice, in light of the peace processes in South Africa and Northern Ireland. It begins by arguing that criminal justice should be reconceived as consisting primarily in the vindication of victims, both direct and indirect. This is not to deny the retributive punishment of perpetrators any role at all, only to insist that it be largely subservient to the goal of (...)
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  26.  5
    Religion's Place at the Table of ‘Secular’ Medical Ethics: A Response to the Commentaries.Nigel Biggar - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (11):873-874.
  27.  19
    Specifyand Distinguish! Interpreting the New Testament on `Non-Violence'.Nigel Biggar - 2009 - Studies in Christian Ethics 22 (2):164-184.
    Widely showered with superlatives when it was first published in 1996, and now commonly regarded as a masterpiece, Richard Hays's The Moral Vision of the New Testament (1996) constructs a pacifist reading of the New Testament. To date, Hays's reading has provoked no systematic refutation from proponents of the doctrine of just war. This essay hopes to offer such a refutation. Its argument has three main planks. First, that Hays's reading of the New Testament stories about god-fearing soldiers, who persist (...)
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  28.  23
    The Hastening That Waits: Karl Barth's Ethics.Nigel Biggar - 1993 - Oxford University Press.
    This book offers a fresh and up-to-date account of the ethical thought of Karl Barth, one of the twentieth century's greatest theologians. In it, the author seeks to recover Barth's ethics from some widespread misunderstandings, and also presents a picture of it as a whole. Drawing on recently published sources, Biggar construes the ethics of the Church Dogmatics as it might have been had Barth lived to complete it. However, The Hastening that Waits is more than apology and description. For (...)
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  29. The New Testament and Violence: Round Two.Nigel Biggar - 2010 - Studies in Christian Ethics 23 (1):73-80.
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  30. The Value of Limited Loyalty : Christianity, the Nation, and Territorial Boundaries.Nigel Biggar - 2007 - In John Aloysius Coleman (ed.), Christian Political Ethics. Princeton University Press.
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  31.  3
    What’s Wrong with Subjective Rights?Nigel Biggar - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (3):399-409.
    ABSTRACTIn the last twenty years a critique of the idea of a right as the property of an individual subject has been articulated by some influential Anglican theologians – Joan Lockwood O’Donovan, Oliver O’Donovan and John Milbank. Their objections are considerably based on an argument about intellectual history. Broadly pursuing an intellectual trajectory first set by Leo Strauss and C. B. Macpherson, these theologians think that the very concept of a ‘subjective right’ is tied, certainly historically but perhaps also logically, (...)
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  32. What's Wrong with Rights?Nigel Biggar - 2020 - Oxford University Press.
    What's Wrong with Rights? argues that contemporary rights-talk obscures the importance civic virtue, military effectiveness and the democratic law legitimacy. It draws upon legal and moral philosophy, moral theology, and court judgments. It spans discussions from medieval Christendom to contemporary debates about justified killing.
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  33.  70
    Book Reviews : The Way of the Lord Jesus, Vol. 2: 'Living a Christian Life', by Germain Grisez. Quincy, Ill., Franciscan Press, 1993. Xxiii + 950 Pp. US $35. [REVIEW]Nigel Biggar - 1995 - Studies in Christian Ethics 8 (1):105-118.
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  34. Book Review : Civil Peace and Sacred Order: Limits and Renewals, I by Stephen R. L. Clark. Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1989, Vii + 198 Pp. 25.00. [REVIEW]Nigel Biggar - 1991 - Studies in Christian Ethics 4 (1):86-88.
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  35.  75
    Book Reviews : Moral Action and Christian Ethics, by Jean Porter. New Studies in Christian Ethics. Cambridge, CUP, 1995. Xvi+235pp. Hb. 35. [REVIEW]Nigel Biggar - 1996 - Studies in Christian Ethics 9 (2):119-123.
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  36.  82
    Book Review : A Parliament of Souls: Limits and Renewals 2, by Stephen R. L. Clark, Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1990, X + 192 Pp. £27.50. [REVIEW]Nigel Biggar - 1992 - Studies in Christian Ethics 5 (2):74-76.
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  37. God, the Responsible Individual, and the Value of Human Life and Suffering.Nigel Biggar - 1998 - Studies in Christian Ethics 11 (1):28-47.
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  38. Review Article: The Just War Revisited.Nigel Biggar - 2006 - Studies in Christian Ethics 19 (2):223-232.
  39. Veritatis Splendor.Nigel Biggar - 1994 - Studies in Christian Ethics 7 (2):11-13.
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