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  1.  38
    Thinking again: education after postmodernism.Nigel Blake (ed.) - 1998 - Westport, Conn.: Bergin & Garvey.
    The 'postmodern condition,' in which instrumentalism finally usurps all other considerations, has produced a kind of intellectual paralysis in the world of education. The authors of this book show how such postmodernist thinkers as Derrida, Foucault, and Lyotard illuminate puzzling aspects of education, arguing that educational theory is currently at an impasse. They postulate that we need these new and disturbing ideas in order to "think again" fruitfully and creatively about education.
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  2.  72
    Education in an age of nihilism.Nigel Blake (ed.) - 2000 - New York: Routledge/Falmer.
    This timely book addresses concerns about educational and moral standards in a world characterised by a growing nihilism.
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  3. Thinking Again: Education after Postmodernism.Nigel Blake, Paul Smeyers, Richard Smith & Paul Standish - 1999 - British Journal of Educational Studies 47 (4):407-408.
     
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  4.  9
    Education in an Age of Nihilism: Education and Moral Standards.Nigel Blake, Paul Smeyers, Richard Smith & Paul Standish (eds.) - 2000 - New York: Routledge.
    This book addresses concerns about educational and moral standards in a world increasingly characterised by nihilism. On the one hand there is widespread anxiety that standards are falling; on the other, new machinery of accountability and inspection to show that they are not. The authors in this book state that we cannot avoid nihilism if we are simply _laissez-faire_ about values, neither can we reduce them to standards of performance, nor must we return to traditional values. They state that we (...)
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  5.  76
    The Blackwell guide to the philosophy of education.Nigel Blake (ed.) - 2003 - Malden, MA: Blackwell.
    "The Blackwell Guide to Philosophy of Education" is state-of-the-art map to the field as well as a valuable reference book.
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  6.  69
    Critical Theory and Critical Pedagogy.Nigel Blake & Jan Masschelein - 2003 - In Nigel Blake, Paul Smeyers, Richard Smith & Paul Standish (eds.), The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Education. Oxford, UK: Blackwell. pp. 38–56.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Characteristics and Development of Critical Theory The Educational Relevance of Critical Theory Distinctive Insights and Contributions Differing Receptions of Critical Theory Critical Theory and the Student Movement An “Other” Critical Pedagogy?
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  7.  19
    The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Education.Nigel Blake, Paul Smeyers, Richard D. Smith & Paul Standish (eds.) - 2002 - Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell.
    In this important survey, an international group of leading philosophers chart the development of philosophy of education in the twentieth century and point to signficant questions for its future. Presents a definitive introduction to the core areas of philosophy of education. Contains 20 newly-commissioned articles, all of which are written by internationally distinguished scholars. Each chapter reviews a problem, examines the current state of the discipline with respect to the topic, and discusses possible futures of the field. Provides a solid (...)
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  8.  4
    The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Education.Nigel Blake, Paul Smeyers, Richard D. Smith & Paul Standish (eds.) - 2002 - Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell.
    In this important survey, an international group of leading philosophers chart the development of philosophy of education in the twentieth century and point to signficant questions for its future. Presents a definitive introduction to the core areas of philosophy of education. Contains 20 newly-commissioned articles, all of which are written by internationally distinguished scholars. Each chapter reviews a problem, examines the current state of the discipline with respect to the topic, and discusses possible futures of the field. Provides a solid (...)
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  9.  26
    Introduction.Nigel Blake & Paul Standish - 2000 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 34 (1):1–16.
    The Internet has recently enjoyed its thirtieth birthday. In 1969, a computer at the University of California sent a message down a wire to another in a research centre at Stanford. The message was just two letters, *LO’.1 Since then the development of the Internet—of the physical infrastructure of computers and the material or broadcast links between them, along with the digital protocols that enable it to function—has been largely an academic achievement. Up until six years ago, the world’s richest (...)
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  10.  13
    Introduction.Nigel Blake & Paul Standish - 2000 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 34 (1):1-16.
    The Internet has recently enjoyed its thirtieth birthday. In 1969, a computer at the University of California sent a message down a wire to another in a research centre at Stanford. The message was just two letters, *LO’.1 Since then the development of the Internet—of the physical infrastructure of computers and the material or broadcast links between them, along with the digital protocols that enable it to function—has been largely an academic achievement. Up until six years ago, the world’s richest (...)
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  11.  70
    Modernity and the problem of cultural pluralism.Nigel Blake - 1992 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 26 (1):39–50.
    A curriculum that reflects a pluralist, multi-cultural society in a characteristically ‘Western’ way may seem to militate against traditionalist sub-cultures, but this outcome is less ‘Western’ than ‘modern’, in Habermas's sense.‘Modernisation’, involving the institutionalisation of rationality and the decentering of consciousness, and thus acceptance of the ‘Western’ solution, is possible within any culture, regardless of its content. In a Western society all are economically compelled to a partial ‘modernisation’, and in Habermas's view all cultures in modern societies suffer erosion by (...)
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  12.  6
    Introduction.Nigel Blake, Paul Smeyers, Richard Smith & Paul Standish - 2003 - In Nigel Blake, Paul Smeyers, Richard Smith & Paul Standish (eds.), The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Education. Oxford, UK: Blackwell. pp. 1–17.
    This chapter contains sections titled: I II III.
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  13.  18
    Ideal speech conditions, modern discourse and education.Nigel Blake - 1995 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 29 (3):355–367.
    Habermas's educational importance is usually misconstrued or underestimated, partly because the scope and implications of ideal speech conditions are generally misunderstood. These conditions are only relevant to discursive speech situations, but non-manipulative teaching need not be discursive. And not even discursive teaching is an appropriate occasion for ideal speech conditions. They properly apply to discourse institutions, at the ‘epistemic centre of modernity’. Thus, the concept of ideal speech conditions impinges on the relation of school to higher education and on curricular (...)
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  14.  61
    Reflectivity, Reflection, and Counter-Education.Ilan Gu-Ze'ev, Jan Masschelein & Nigel Blake - 2001 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 20 (2):93-106.
    This article sets forward a new concept of reflection, to be contrasted with more usual reading of the concept for which we use the term `reflectivity'. The contrast is related to a distinction between normalizing education and counter-education. We claim that within the framework of normalizing education there is no room for reflection, but only for reflectivity. In contrast to reflectivity, reflection manifests a struggle of the subject against the effects of power which govern the constitution of her conceptual apparatus, (...)
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  15.  31
    Between postmodernism and anti‐modernism: The predicament of Educational Studies.Nigel Blake - 1996 - British Journal of Educational Studies 44 (1):42-65.
    The paper highlights the urgent and radical questions and problems which postmodernism poses for educational studies in general, and the philosophy of education in particular. First, it outlines and interrelates the legacies of modernism in social and cultural theory. Next, it describes the reactionary anti-modernism of the Right, and contrasts this with traditionalism. It is argued that the current political and economic context of education is largely anti-modernist, not traditionalist. The stirrings of radical doubts about modernism are described and contrasted (...)
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  16.  10
    Church schools, religious education and the multi-ethnic community: A reply to David Aspin.Nigel Blake - 1983 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 17 (2):241–250.
    Nigel Blake; Church Schools, Religious Education and the Multi-ethnic Community: a reply to David Aspin, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 17, Issue 2.
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  17.  18
    Hubert Dreyfus on distance education: Relays of educational embodiment.Nigel Blake - 2002 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 34 (4):379–385.
  18.  13
    Tutors and students without faces or places.Nigel Blake - 2000 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 34 (1):183–196.
    Online tuition is a practice—practised by this writer—in which students form tutorial relationships with a teacher, and in some models with each other, by the modes of email, Web-mediated file exchange and asynchronous computer conferencing (the construction of multiple threads of conversation and dialogue, as in Web chat rooms). It may centrally revolve around an exchange of assignments and comments. It is quite different from simply referring students to the information and activities on various Web-sites. Centrally, tuition is conducted here (...)
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  19.  3
    Tutors and Students without Faces or Places.Nigel Blake - 2000 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 34 (1):183-196.
    Online tuition is a practice—practised by this writer—in which students form tutorial relationships with a teacher, and in some models with each other, by the modes of email, Web-mediated file exchange and asynchronous computer conferencing (the construction of multiple threads of conversation and dialogue, as in Web chat rooms). It may centrally revolve around an exchange of assignments and comments. It is quite different from simply referring students to the information and activities on various Web-sites. Centrally, tuition is conducted here (...)
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  20.  59
    The democracy we need: Situation, post-foundationalism and enlightenment.Nigel Blake - 1996 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 30 (2):215–238.
    Postmodernism precludes philosophical justifications for democracy. This undermines the role of philosophy of education and leaves us with weaker reasons for educational democracy than we need. If the ‘postmodern challenge’ is as Wilfred Carr conceives it, Jürgen Habermas meets that challenge. His work rests on neither Enlightenment essentialism nor foundationalism. Habermas can accept and explain that consciousness is historically and socially situated in discourse, yet still argue to the possibility of emancipation. I defend his conception of rationality from charges of (...)
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  21.  18
    JME Referees in 2002.Mary Lou Arnold, Matthew Keefer, Nigel Laurie, Marvin Berkowitz, Nigel Blake, Brian Mahon, Li Maosen, Ted Brelsford, Alan Reiman & David Carr - 2003 - Journal of Moral Education 32 (2):215-215.
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  22.  2
    A position in society, an intimate constraint.Nigel Blake - 1992 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 26 (2):271–276.
    Nigel Blake; A Position in Society, an Intimate Constraint, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 26, Issue 2, 30 May 2006, Pages 271–276, https://doi.org/.
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  23.  20
    A Postmodernism Worth Bothering About: A Rejoinder to Cole, Hill and Rikowski.Nigel Blake - 1997 - British Journal of Educational Studies 45 (3):293-305.
    This paper is a response to one published in the June 1997 edition of the BJES (Cole, Hill & Rikowski, 1997) which criticises the author's claims about the utility of postmodern analysis for studies in education (Blake, 1997).
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  24.  1
    Hubert Dreyfus on Distance Education: relays of educational embodiment.Nigel Blake - 2002 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 34 (4):379-385.
  25.  18
    Intellectual freedom and the universities: A reply to Anthony O'Hear.Nigel Blake - 1988 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 22 (2):251–263.
    Nigel Blake; Intellectual Freedom and the Universities: a reply to Anthony O'Hear, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 22, Issue 2, 30 May 2006, Pages 25.
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  26.  12
    Justifying peace education: A reply to professor flew.Nigel Blake - 1986 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 20 (2):257–264.
    Nigel Blake; Justifying Peace Education: a reply to Professor Flew, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 20, Issue 2, 30 May 2006, Pages 257–264, https://.
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  27.  30
    Peace education and national security.Nigel Blake - 1985 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 19 (1):27–38.
    Nigel Blake; Peace Education and National Security, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 19, Issue 1, 30 May 2006, Pages 27–38, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.
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  28.  23
    Precarious work.Nigel Blake, Paul Smeyers, Richard Smith & Paul Standish - 2000 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 32 (3):339–349.
  29.  28
    Unnecessary Supplement.Nigel Blake, Paul Smeyers, Richard Smith & Paul Standish - 2001 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 20 (5):433-441.
  30.  16
    Philosophy in schools: A request for clarification.Ruth Jonathan & Nigel Blake - 1988 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 22 (2):221–227.
    Ruth Jonathan, Nigel Blake; Philosophy in Schools: a request for clarification, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 22, Issue 2, 30 May 2006, Pages 221–2.
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