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Nigel Clark [17]Nigel Halcomb Clark [1]
  1.  13
    Geosocial Formations and the Anthropocene.Nigel Clark & Kathryn Yusoff - 2017 - Theory, Culture and Society 34 (2-3):3-23.
    For at least two centuries most social thought has taken the earth to be the stable platform upon which dynamic social processes play out. Both climate change and the Anthropocene thesis – with their enfolding of dramatic geologic change into the space-time of social life – are now provoking social thinkers into closer engagement with earth science. After revisiting the decisive influence of the late 18th-century notion of geological formations on the idea of social formations, this introductory article turns to (...)
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  2.  9
    Rock, Life, Fire: Speculative Geophysics and the Anthropocene.Nigel Clark - 2012 - Oxford Literary Review 34 (2):259-276.
    If origins are as complex and perturbing as Derrida suggests, then we might ask of the current anthropic environmental predicament: what kind of planet is it that gives birth to a creature capable of doing such things? Biological life may be at its liveliest along the earth's sutures and fault-lines. But so too is fire. If humans are a fire species, then this is a fire planet. From the point of view of a ‘speculative geophysics’, our combustive habits may say (...)
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  3.  5
    Politics of Strata.Nigel Clark - 2017 - Theory, Culture and Society 34 (2-3):211-231.
    Modern western political thought revolves around globality, focusing on the partitioning and the connecting up of the earth’s surface. But climate change and the Anthropocene thesis raise pressing questions about human interchange with the geological and temporal depths of the earth. Drawing on contemporary earth science and the geophilosophy of Deleuze and Guattari, this article explores how geological strata are emerging as provocations for political issue formation. The first section reviews the emergence – and eventual turn away from – concern (...)
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  4.  8
    Extending Hospitality: Giving Space, Taking Time.Mustafa Dikeç, Nigel Clark & Clive Barnett - 2009 - Paragraph 32 (1):1-14.
    The recent revival of the theme of hospitality in the humanities and social sciences reflects a shared concern with issues of belonging, identity and placement that arises out of the experience of globalized social life. In this context, migration — or spatial dislocation and relocation — is often equated with demands for hospitality. There is a need to engage more carefully with the ‘proximities’ that prompt acts of hospitality and inhospitality; to attend more closely to their spatial and temporal dimensions. (...)
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  5.  13
    Ex-Orbitant Globality.Nigel Clark - 2005 - Theory, Culture and Society 22 (5):165-185.
    Social theorists, drawing on the study of complex dynamical systems to address global processes, tend to evoke an immanent globality devoid of a constitutive otherness or outside. However, as well as dealing with the internal dynamics of systems, complexity studies point to the mutual implication of systems and their surroundings: a concern that resonates with the interest in the convolutions of the inside–outside relationship prominent in post-structural philosophies. This article, looking at theories about the dynamical characteristics of the solar system, (...)
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  6.  35
    An Interview with Elizabeth Grosz: Geopower, Inhumanism and the Biopolitical.Elizabeth Grosz, Kathryn Yusoff & Nigel Clark - 2017 - Theory, Culture and Society 34 (2-3):129-146.
    This article is an interview with Elizabeth Grosz by Kathryn Yusoff and Nigel Clark. It primarily addresses Grosz’s approaches to ‘geopower’, and the discussion encompasses an exploration of her ideas on biopolitics, inhuman forces and material experimentation. Grosz describes geopower as a force that subtends the possibility of politics. The interview is accompanied by a brief contextualizing introduction examining the themes of geophilosophy and the inhumanities in Grosz’s work.
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  7.  5
    'Botanizing on the Asphalt'? The Complex Life of Cosmopolitan Bodies.Nigel Clark - 2000 - Body and Society 6 (3-4):12-33.
    Notions of complexity, non-linear dynamics and self-organization in the natural sciences seem to resonate with certain literary and social scientific traditions of thinking about cosmopolitan life in a sense that may be more than merely metaphorical. Just as science speaks of forms and patterns which come into being spontaneously, unpredictably and `from below', so too is there a resurgent interest in a `baroque' vision of modernity which foregrounds chance encounters and `underworld' associations. The parallels are still stronger if we take (...)
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  8.  10
    The Demon-Seed.Nigel Clark - 2002 - Theory, Culture and Society 19 (1-2):101-125.
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  9. Anthropocene Bodies, Geological Time and the Crisis of Natality.Nigel Clark - 2017 - Body and Society 23 (3):156-180.
    In its explicit engagement with the possibility of human extinction, the Anthropocene thesis might be seen as signalling a ‘crisis of natality’. Engaging with two works of fiction – Cormac McCarthy’s The Road and Anne Michaels’ Fugitive Pieces – the article explores the embodied, affective and intimate dimensions of the struggle to sustain life under catastrophic conditions. Though centred on male protagonists, both novels offer insights into a ‘stratigraphic time’ associated primarily with maternal responsibility – involving a temporal give-and-take that (...)
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  10.  10
    Bare Life on Molten Rock.Nigel Clark - 2018 - Substance 47 (2):8-22.
    She laughs to herself, and her whole body shakes with it—she's got a volcano to choke off. So she curls the fingers of one hand into a fist, and sears down its throat with her awareness, not burning but cooling, turning its own fury back on it to seal every breach. She forces the growing magma chamber, back, back, down, down …We know surprisingly little about rock. Rock is red-hot, creeping, viscous stuff that we rarely see, and touch at our (...)
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  11.  5
    Panic Ecology.Nigel Clark - 1997 - Theory, Culture and Society 14 (1):77-96.
  12. Rear-View Mirrorshades: The Recursive Generation of the Cyberbody.Nigel Clark - 1995 - Body and Society 1 (3-4):113-133.
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  13.  42
    Thing Theory: Graham Harman, Heidegger Explained: From Phenomenon to Thing, Chicago and La Salle, IL: Open Court, Pp X, 193.Nigel Clark - 2007 - Human Studies 30 (4):471-477.
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  14. Earthing the Anthropos? From ‘Socializing the Anthropocene’ to Geologizing the Social.Yasmin Gunaratnam & Nigel Clark - 2017 - European Journal of Social Theory 20 (1):146-163.
    Responding to claims of Anthropocene geoscience that humans are now geological agents, social scientists are calling for renewed attention to the social, cultural, political and historical differentiation of the Anthropos. But does this leave critical social thought’s own key concepts and categories unperturbed by the Anthropocene provocation to think through dynamic earth processes? Can we ‘socialize the Anthropocene’ without also opening ‘the social’ to climate, geology and earth system change? Revisiting the earth science behind the Anthropocene thesis and drawing on (...)
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  15. Queer Fire: Ecology, Combustion and Pyrosexual Desire.Kathryn Yusoff & Nigel Clark - 2018 - Feminist Review 118 (1):7-24.
    We set out by noting the preference for circular flows in ecological thought, and the related abhorrence of inefficiency and waste that Western ecology shares with mainstream economic thinking. This has often been manifest in a shared disdain both for uncontained, free-burning fire and for ‘unmanaged’ sexual desire. The paper constructs a ‘pyrosexual’ counter-narrative that explores the mutually constitutive and generative implication of sex and fire. Bringing together the solar ecology of Georges Bataille, feminist and queer thinking about sexuality and (...)
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