Search results for 'Nigel Stepp' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Nigel Stepp, Anthony Chemero & Michael T. Turvey (2011). Philosophy for the Rest of Cognitive Science. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):425-437.
    Cognitive science has always included multiple methodologies and theoretical commitments. The philosophy of cognitive science should embrace, or at least acknowledge, this diversity. Bechtel’s (2009a) proposed philosophy of cognitive science, however, applies only to representationalist and mechanist cognitive science, ignoring the substantial minority of dynamically oriented cognitive scientists. As an example of nonrepresentational, dynamical cognitive science, we describe strong anticipation as a model for circadian systems (Stepp & Turvey, 2009). We then propose a philosophy of science appropriate to nonrepresentational, (...)
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  2.  18
    Nigel Stepp & Michael T. Turvey (2008). Anticipating Synchronization as an Alternative to the Internal Model. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (2):216-217.
    The fundamental assumption of compensation for visual delays states that, since delays are dealt with, there must be compensatory mechanisms. These mechanisms are taken to be internal models. Alternatives for delay compensation exist, suggesting that this assumption may not be fundamental, and nor should the existence of internal models be assumed. Delays may even be employed in their own compensation.
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  3. Thrift Nigel (1990). Reviews: Mary W. Helms, Ulysses" Sail: An Ethnographic Odyssey of Power, Knowledge, and Geographical Distance, Princeton, Nj: Princeton University Press, 1988,? 25.20, Paper? 8.30, XII+ 297 Pp. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 3 (2).
     
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  4.  40
    Thomas Nigel (1998). Imagination, Eliminativism, and the Pre-History of Consciousness. Consciousness Research Abstracts 3.
    Classical and medieval writers had no term for consciousness in anything like the modern sense, and their philosophy seems not to have been troubled by the mind-body problem. Contemporary eliminativists find strong support in this fact for their claim that consciousness does not exist, or, at least, is not an appropriate scientific explanandum. They typically hold that contemporary conceptions of consciousness are artefacts of Descartes' (now outmoded) views about matter and his unrealistic craving for epistemological certainty. Essentially, they say, our (...)
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  5.  1
    Rogasch Nigel, Daskalakis Zafiris & Fitzgerald Paul (2015). The Relationship Between Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortical Inhibition and Working Memory Performance: A Combined TMS-EEG Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
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  6. M. De S. Nigel (1991). Cameron, The New Medicine: Life and Death After Hippocrates. Chicago and London: Bioethics Press 2001:100-101.
     
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  7. Walker Nigel (1997). Harms, Probabilities and Precautions. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 17 (4).
     
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  8. Harris Nigel (2004). Trade in Early India: Themes in Indian History and Origins of the European Economy: Communications and Commerce, AD 300-900. [REVIEW] Historical Materialism 12 (4):455-462.
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  9. Robert Stepp (1979). Learning Without Negative Examples Via Variable-Valued Logic Characterizations: The Uniclass Inductive Program AQ7UNI. Dept. Of Computer Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
     
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  10. Robert Stepp (1979). The Uniclass Inductive Program AQ7UNI: Program Implementation and User's Guide. Dept. Of Computer Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
     
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  11.  6
    Stein M. Wivestad (2011). Conditions for 'Upbuilding': A Reply to Nigel Tubbs' Reading of Kierkegaard. Journal of Philosophy of Education 45 (4):613-625.
    A Special Issue of the Journal of Philosophy of Education, 2005, issue 2, contains an interesting ‘Philosophy of the Teacher’ by Nigel Tubbs. It rejects attempts in pedagogical traditions to ignore or avoid the contradiction between the teacher as master and as servant, and ends with an interpretation of ‘upbuilding’, a central concept in Søren Kierkegaard's writings. According to Tubbs’ reading, the teacher's patient struggle with herself in doubt is the basic condition for upbuilding, whereby the eternal's perfect gift (...)
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  12. Nigel Tubbs (2005). Special Issue-Philosophy of the Teacher by Nigel Tubbs-Introduction. Journal of Philosophy of Education 39 (2).
     
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  13.  62
    J. Leech (2013). The Semantics and Metaphysics of Natural Kinds, Edited by Helen Beebee and Nigel Sabbarton-Leary. Mind 122 (485):253-257.
    Book review of "The Semantics and Metaphysics of Natural Kinds", edited by Helen Beebee and Nigel Sabbarton-Leary (Routledge, 2010).
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  14.  7
    Claus Kreß (2015). Revitalised Early Christian Just War Thinking and International Law: Some Observations on Nigel Biggar’s In Defence of War. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (3):305-315.
    In light of the well-established international legal principle of non-use of force in international relations, Nigel Biggar’s In Defence of War may give rise to concern in the academy of international lawyers. But the gap between the book’s conclusions and the current international law on the use of force turns out to be less significant upon closer inspection than at first sight. This essay reviews Biggar’s concept of ‘just war as punishment’, his view on the legal status of the (...)
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  15.  42
    Pavlos Eleftheriadis (2010). A Symposium on Nigel Simmonds's Law as a Moral Idea. Jurisprudence 1 (2):241-244.
    This issue of Jurisprudence features a symposium on Nigel Simmonds's Law as a Moral Idea. There are essays by John Finnis, John Gardner, Timothy Endicott and a Reply by Nigel Simmonds. The papers are based on presentations given at a panel discussion in Oxford in December 2009. In this 'Introduction' Pavlos Eleftheriadis outlines the main themes of the book, namely that the idea of law is intrinsically moral, the distinction between analytical and normative jurisprudence is false and law (...)
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  16.  7
    Richard B. Hays (2009). Narrate and Embody: A Response To Nigel Biggar,Specify and Distinguish'. Studies in Christian Ethics 22 (2):185-198.
    This response has two parts: a reply to Nigel Biggar's specific criticisms of my exegesis and an appeal for attention to more fundamental theological issues. Biggar generally disregards the narrative and epistolary contexts of the verses he cites and introduces anachronistic conceptual distinctions. Beyond specific exegetical disagreements, his argument fails to address the broader christological, ecclesiological, and eschatological warrants for Christians to embody Jesus' way of peace. The moral vocation of the people of God is grounded in the story (...)
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  17.  22
    R. B. Hays (2009). Narrate and Embody: A Response To Nigel Biggar, `Specify and Distinguish'. Studies in Christian Ethics 22 (2):185-198.
    This response has two parts: a reply to Nigel Biggar's specific criticisms of my exegesis and an appeal for attention to more fundamental theological issues. Biggar generally disregards the narrative and epistolary contexts of the verses he cites and introduces anachronistic conceptual distinctions. Beyond specific exegetical disagreements, his argument fails to address the broader christological, ecclesiological, and eschatological warrants for Christians to embody Jesus' way of peace. The moral vocation of the people of God is grounded in the story (...)
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  18. E. D. Cook (1990). Book Review : Medicine in Crisis: A Christian Response, Edited by Ian Brown and Nigel de S. Cameron. Edinburgh, Rutherford House, 1988. 128 Pp. 11.90 Hb., 5.90 Pb. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 3 (1):107-107.
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  19. M. Banner (1994). Book Review : The Hastening That Waits: Karl Barth's Ethics, by Nigel Biggar. Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1993. 194 Pp. 25. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 7 (2):123-125.
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  20. J. Gladwin (1990). Book Review : Theological Politics: A Critique of 'Faith in the City', by Nigel Biggar. Oxford, Latimer House, 1988. 85 Pp. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 3 (1):127-127.
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  21.  97
    Viren Swami (2012). Review: Nigel Mackay and Agnes Petocz, Eds, Realism and Psychology: Collected Essays Leiden: Brill, 2011. Xx + 911 Pp. ISBN 978-90-04-1887-7, Hardback €228.00/$323.00. [REVIEW] Journal of Critical Realism 11 (2):262-265.
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  22.  82
    F. Depoortere (2012). Book Review: Nigel Biggar and Linda Hogan (Eds.), Religious Voices in Public Places. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 25 (4):494-497.
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  23. S. Law (2012). The Semantics and Metaphysics of Natural Kinds Edited by Helen Beebee and Nigel Sabbarton-Leary. Analysis 72 (3):621-622.
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  24. R. Preston (1995). A Response To Nigel Biggar and Donald Hay's the Bible, Christian Ethics and the Provision of Social Security. Studies in Christian Ethics 8 (2):92-95.
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  25.  9
    Scott B. Rae (2001). Cameron, Nigel M. De S., Scott E. Daniels, and Barbara J. White, Eds. Bioengagement: Making a Christian Difference Through Bioethics Today. [REVIEW] The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 1 (1):107-108.
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  26. G. J. Hughes (2002). Book Reviews : The Revival of Natural Law: Philosophical, Theological and Ethical Responses to the Finnis-Grisez School, Edited by Nigel Biggar and Rufus Black. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2000. 318 Pp. Hb. 47.50 ISBN 0-7546-1262-. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 15 (1):118-122.
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  27.  20
    Marilyn Mason (2003). Nigel Warburton, The Art Question, (London: Routledge, 2003). Think 2 (5):103-106.
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  28.  20
    Douglas J. Cock (1995). A Motley Wisdom: The Best of G. K. Chesterton, Chosen and Introduced by Nigel Forde. The Chesterton Review 21 (4):524-525.
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  29.  7
    Michael L. Gross (2016). In Defence of War, by Nigel Biggar. Mind 125 (498):558-562.
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  30.  52
    F. Depoortere (2012). Book Review: Nigel Biggar, Behaving in Public: How to Do Christian Ethics. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 25 (3):369-372.
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  31.  17
    Anthony Cooney (1995). A Motley Wisdom: The Best of G. K. Chesterton. Chosen and Introduced by Nigel Forde. The Chesterton Review 21 (4):526-528.
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  32.  57
    R. B. Hays (2010). The Thorny Task of Reconciliation: Another Response to Nigel Biggar. Studies in Christian Ethics 23 (1):81-86.
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  33.  68
    John K. Burk (2007). Aiming to Kill: The Ethics of Suicide and Euthanasia. By Nigel Biggar, Religion and the Death Penalty: A Call for Reckoning. Edited by Erik C. Owens, John D. Carlson, and Eric P. Elshtain and Theological Fragments: Explorations in Unsystematic Theology. By Duncan B. Forrester. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 48 (3):489–491.
  34.  11
    Markus Meckl (2012). Free Speech: A Very Short Introduction. By Nigel Warburton. The European Legacy 17 (5):703 - 703.
    The European Legacy, Volume 17, Issue 5, Page 703, August 2012.
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  35.  22
    Stephen Juan (2008). Philosophers Behaving Badly, by Nigel Rodgers and Mel Thompson. Philosophy Now 65:44-45.
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  36.  33
    Ross Abbinnett (2010). Review of Nigel Tubbs, Education in Hegel. [REVIEW] Studies in Philosophy and Education 29 (1):89-96.
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  37.  2
    D. G. Mulcahy (2016). Philosophy and Modern Liberal Arts Education: Freedom is to Learn. By Nigel Tubbs. British Journal of Educational Studies 64 (2):261-262.
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  38.  18
    Aidan Mackey (1995). A Motley Wisdom: The Best of G. K. Chesterton. Chosen and Intmduced by Nigel Forde; and Battling for the Modern Mind: A Beginner's Chesterton, by Thomas C. Peters. [REVIEW] The Chesterton Review 21 (4):525-526.
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  39.  7
    Xavier Symons (2015). On the Univocity of Rationality: A Response to Nigel Biggar’s ‘Why Religion Deserves a Place in Secular Medicine’. Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (11):870-872.
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  40.  55
    Jonathan Gorman (2009). Law as a Moral Idea • by Nigel Simmonds. Analysis 69 (2):395-397.
    This is a pugnacious book, born of ancient controversy and attempting to return the debate to a time before the central jurisprudential questions were set by Hart and other legal positivists. Simmonds addresses those familiar with current analytical philosophy of law: those of us who know our Hart, Fuller, Dworkin, Raz, MacCormick and Kramer, and who perhaps need to have our attention drawn to Plato, Aristotle, Grotius, Hobbes and Kant. Presuming an informed readership, there is no bibliography, and it incorporates (...)
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  41.  22
    James Garvey (2013). Nigel Warburton Interview. The Philosophers' Magazine 61 (61):58-67.
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  42.  6
    Cécile Fabre (2015). Nigel Biggar’s Just War: Reflections on Jus Ad Bellum. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (3):292-297.
    This paper raises some questions about Biggar’s accounts of the just cause and proportionality criteria for a just war. With respect to just cause, it argues that Biggar is committed to a broader range of justifications for war than one might think. Regarding proportionality, it claims that his account thereof invites reflection on the morality of conscription, and, more important still, given the book’s main aim—to refute Christian pacifism—in fact should lead him to embrace pacifism.
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  43. Frank Palmeri (2006). Deconstructing the Animal-Human Binary: Recent Work in Animal Studies: Review of Elephant Slaves and Pampered Parrots: Exotic Animals in Eighteenth-Century Paris by Louise E. Robbins, Experimenting with Humans and Animals: From Galen to Animal Rights by Anita Guerrini, Figuring Animals: Essays on Animal Images in Art, Literature, Philosophy, and Popular Culture, Edited by Mary Sanders Pollock and Catherine Rainwater, Renaissance Beasts: Of Animals, Humans, and Other Wonderful Creatures, Edited by Erica Fudge, Romanticism and Animal Rights by David Perkins, Savages and Beasts: The Birth of the Modern Zoo by Nigel Rothfels, and Zoontologies: The Question of the Animal, Edited by Cary Wolfe. [REVIEW] Clio 36:407-420.
     
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  44.  12
    Edward V. Vacek (1983). Punishment, Danger and Stigma: The Morality of Criminal Justice. By Nigel Walker. Modern Schoolman 60 (2):142-143.
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  45. Edmund L. Pincoffs (1982). Nigel Walker, Punishment, Danger and Stigma: The Morality of Criminal Justice Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 2 (2/3):155-158.
     
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  46. Gamal Abdel Shehid (2001). Nigel C. Gibson, Ed., Rethinking Fanon: The Continuing Dialogue Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 21 (3):178-180.
  47.  4
    J. Kelsay (2014). Nigel Biggar's In Defence of War: A Review Essay. Studies in Christian Ethics 27 (4):490-498.
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  48.  10
    C. Grant (2009). Positivism and the Separation of Law and Morals, Fifty Years On: Institutions of Law: An Essay in Legal Theory, by Neil MacCormick. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 2007. 336 Pp. $75.00 . Law as a Moral Idea, by Nigel Simmonds. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 2007. 220 Pp. $65.00 . Objectivity and the Rule of Law, by Matthew Kramer. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2007. 260 Pp. $75.00 ; $27.99. [REVIEW] Political Theory 37 (1):167-173.
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  49.  23
    Nick Hostettler (2007). Did Ludwig Wittgenstein Really_ Understand Roy Bhaskar? Review of _Wittgenstein and the Idea of a Critical Social Theory: A Critique of Giddens, Habermas and Bhaskar by Nigel Pleasants. [REVIEW] Journal of Critical Realism 3 (1).
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  50.  10
    Joram Hirschfeld (1989). Review: Nigel J. Cutland, Nonstandard Measure Theory and its Applications. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 54 (1):290-291.
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