Results for 'Nishida Kitar��'

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  1.  47
    Intuition and Reflection in Self-Consciousness.Kitar? Nishida - 1987 - State University of New York Press.
    This English translation of Intuition and Reflection in Self-Consciousness evokes the movement and flavor of the original, clarifies its obscurities, and eliminates the repetitions.
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  2. Kitaro Nishida = Nishida Kitaro : Moderne Japanische Philosophie Und Die Frage Nach der Interkulturalität.Rolf Elberfeld (ed.) - 1999 - Brill | Rodopi.
    Im Zentrum der Untersuchung steht die Philosophie des modernen japanischen Philosophen Kitar??o?? Nishida und ihr Bezug zur Frage nach der Interkulturalität. Nishidas Philosophie ist einerseits interkulturell orientierte Philosophie - entstanden aus der interkulturellen Begegnung zwischen westlicher und japanischer Kultur im Rahmen des modernen Japans - und andererseits bietet sie einen Ansatz zu einer Philosophie der Interkulturalität . Der Ansatz gibt einen neuen Blick auf die globalen geschichtlichen Vorgänge frei - gesehen durch die Augen eines außereuropäischen Denkers. Mit Nishidas Philosophie (...)
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  3.  1
    Kitaro Nishida (1870-1945): Moderne Japanische Philosophie Und Die Frage Nach der Interkulturalität.Rolf Elberfeld - 1999 - Brill | Rodopi.
    Im Zentrum der Untersuchung steht die Philosophie des modernen japanischen Philosophen Kitar??o?? Nishida und ihr Bezug zur Frage nach der Interkulturalität. Nishidas Philosophie ist einerseits _interkulturell orientierte Philosophie_ - entstanden aus der interkulturellen Begegnung zwischen westlicher und japanischer Kultur im Rahmen des modernen Japans - und andererseits bietet sie einen Ansatz zu einer _Philosophie der Interkulturalität_. Der Ansatz gibt einen neuen Blick auf die globalen geschichtlichen Vorgänge frei - gesehen durch die Augen eines außereuropäischen Denkers. Mit Nishidas Philosophie und (...)
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  4.  14
    The Logic of Nothingness: A Study of Nishida Kitarō.Robert Wargo - 2005 - University of Hawai'i Press.
    The writings of Nishida Kitar , whose name has become almost synonymous with Japanese philosophy, continue to attract attention around the world. Yet studies of his thought in Western languages have tended to overlook two key areas: first, the influence of the generation of Japanese philosophers who preceded Nishida; and second, the logic of basho (place), the cornerstone of Nishida's mature philosophical system. The Logic of Nothingness addresses both of these topics. Robert Wargo argues that the overriding (...)
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  5.  41
    The Confucian Roots of Zen No Kenkyū: Nishida's Debt to Wang Yang-Ming in the Search for a Philosophy of Praxis.Dermott J. Walsh - 2011 - Asian Philosophy 21 (4):361 - 372.
    This essay takes as its focus Japanese philosopher Nishida Kitar? (1870?1945) and his seminal first text, An Inquiry into the Good (or in Japanese zen no kenky?). Until now scholarship has taken for granted the predominantly Buddhist orientation of this text, centered around an analysis of the central concept of ?pure experience? (junsui keiken) as something Nishdia extrapolates from his early experience of Zen meditation. However, in this paper I will present an alternative and more accurate account of the (...)
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  6.  53
    From the "Topos of Nothingness" to the "Space of Transparency": Kitarō Nishida's Notion Of.Jin Baek - 2008 - Philosophy East and West 58 (1).
    : In his philosophy of nothingness, Kitar Nishida illuminates the matrix of transformation of the world ‘‘from the Created to the Creating’’ (tsukuru mono kara tsukurareta mono e) through shintai, or the body. In this matrix, shintai enters into the stage of an action-sensation continuum and emerges as the immaculate iconic tool of nothingness to create new figures as extended self. This idea of shintai has resonance with the development of postwar art in Japan. The ‘‘Space of Transparency’’ put (...)
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  7.  14
    From the "Topos of Nothingness" to the "Space of Transparency": Kitarō Nishida's Notion of Shintai and Its Influence on Art and Architecture.Jin Baek - 2008 - Philosophy East and West 58 (1):83-107.
    In his philosophy of nothingness, Kitar Nishida illuminates the matrix of transformation of the world ''from the Created to the Creating'' through shintai, or the body. In this matrix, shintai enters into the stage of an action-sensation continuum and emerges as the immaculate iconic tool of nothingness to create new figures as extended self. This idea of shintai has resonance with the development of postwar art in Japan. The ''Space of Transparency'' put forth by Ufan Lee, the leader of (...)
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  8.  14
    Aesthetics and Politics of Space in Russia and Japan: A Comparative Philosophical Study.Thorsten Botz-Bornstein - 2009 - Lexington Books.
    Introduction -- The historical foundations of Russian and Japanese philosophies -- Space in NOH : plays and icons -- Models of cultural space derived from Nishida Kitar and Semën L. Frank (Basho and Sobornost) -- Space and aesthetics : a dialogue between Nishida Kitar and Mikhail Bakhtin -- From community to time, space, development : Trubetzkoy, Nishida, Watsuji -- Conclusion -- Postface: Resistance and slave nations.
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  9. Nishida Tetsugaku Senshu.Kitaro Nishida, Keiichi Noe, Shizuteru Ueda & Ryosuke Ohashi - 1998
     
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  10.  2
    Place and Dialectic: Two Essays by Kitarō Nishida ; Translated by John W.M. Krummel and Shigenori Nagatomo.Kitarō Nishida - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    Place and Dialectic presents two essays by Nishida Kitaro, translated into English for the first time by John W.M. Krummel and Shigenori Nagatomo. Nishida is widely regarded as one of the father figures of modern Japanese philosophy and as the founder of the first distinctly Japanese school of philosophy, the Kyoto school, known for its synthesis of western philosophy, Christian theology, and Buddhist thought. The two essays included here are ''Basho'' from 1926/27 and ''Logic and Life'' from 1936/37. (...)
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  11.  43
    Nishida Kitarō’s Philosophy of Body.Ching-Yuen Cheung - 2014 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (4):507-523.
    In this paper, I shall discuss Nishida’s 西田 philosophy of body from the aspects of acting intuition, rhythm, and situatedness. Pure experience used to be the starting point of Nishida’s early philosophy. In his later philosophy, however, the keyword in Nishida’s philosophy is no longer “experience” but “acting.” It is neither “I think therefore I am” nor “I will therefore I am,” but “I act therefore I am.” As the organ of acting intuition, body is one of (...)
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  12. Nishida and Merleau-Ponty: Art, “Depth,” and “Seeing Without a Seer”.Adam Loughnane - 2016 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 1:47-74.
    This paper sets Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Nishida Kitarō in dialogue and explore the interpretations of artistic expression, which inform their similar phenomenological accounts of perception. I discuss how both philosophers look to artistic practice to reveal multi-perspectival aspects of vision. They do so, I argue, by going beyond a “positivist” representational under-standing of perception and by including negative aspects of visual experience as constitutive of vision. Following this account, I interpret artworks by Cézanne, Guo Xi, Rodin, and Hasegawa according (...)
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  13. Nishida Kitarō and Chinese Philosophy. 2: Debt and Distance.Michel Dalissier - 2010 - Japan Review 22:137-170.
    Th is paper is the second part of a general study on the relationship between Nishida and Chinese philosophy. In the fi rst, I explored the extent to which Nishida’s philosophy was infl uenced, directly and indirectly, explicitly and implicitly, historically and conceptually, by materials coming from the intellectual horizon of Chinese thought. I concentrate here on Nishida’s own position toward what he understood by “Chinese philosophy.” Is this philosophy, so suggestive for Nishida, promoted to a (...)
     
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  14.  5
    Nishida Kitarō and Muhammad ‘Abduh on God and Reason: Towards a Theology of Place.Thorsten Botz-Bornstein - 2022 - Asian Philosophy 32 (2):105-125.
    I compare the Japanese philosopher Nishida Kitaro with the Egyptian philosopher and reformer Muhammad ‘Abduh. Both philosophies emerged within similar cultural contexts. Bot...
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  15. Nishida on Heidegger.Curtis A. Rigsby - 2010 - Continental Philosophy Review 42 (4):511-553.
    Heidegger and East-Asian thought have traditionally been strongly correlated. However, although still largely unrecognized, significant differences between the political and metaphysical stance of Heidegger and his perceived counterparts in East-Asia most certainly exist. One of the most dramatic discontinuities between East-Asian thought and Heidegger is revealed through an investigation of Kitarō Nishida’s own vigorous criticism of Heidegger. Ironically, more than one study of Heidegger and East-Asian thought has submitted that Nishida is that representative of East-Asian thought whose philosophy (...)
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  16.  2
    Nishida Kitarô’s Studies of the Good and the Debate Concerning Universal Truth in Early Twentieth-Century Japan.Robert W. Adams - 1998 - The Paideia Archive: Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 24:1-6.
    When Nishida Kitarô wrote Studies of the Good, he was a high school teacher in Kanazawa far from Tokyo, the center of Japanese scholarship. While he was praised for his intellectual effort, there was no substantive agreement about the content of his ideas. Critics disagreed with the way he conceived of reality and of truth as contained in reality. Taken together, I believe that the responses to Nishida's early work give us a window on the state of Japanese (...)
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  17.  27
    Nishida and the Historical World: An Examination of Active Intuition, the Body, and Time.Elizabeth McManaman Grosz - 2014 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 6 (2):143-157.
    This article will examine the phase of Nishida’s thought in which he turns to the historical world and present the benefits of this turn to his overall philosophical project. In “The Philosophy of History in the ‘Later’ Nishida,” Woo-Sung Huh claims that Nishida Kitaro’s attempt to integrate history into his earlier writings on self-consciousness is a “wrong turn.” I will demonstrate how Huh’s criticism of Nishida’s writings on history stems from Huh’s own ontological assumption that consciousness (...)
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  18.  15
    西田哲学と天台仏教 (Nishida's philosophy and Tiantai Buddhism).Tomomi Asakura - 2015 - Nishida Tetsugakukai Nenpo 12:151-165.
    This paper attempts to show the characteristics of Tiantai’s perfect teaching (yuanjiao) in Nishida’s philosophy of basho. This is an alternative to a certain type of Nishida interpretation that emphasizes influences from Huayan Buddhism and the Awakening of Faith in Nishida’s metaphysics, especially in his later notion of absolutely contradictory identity. These Buddhist doctrines as well as Yogācāra Buddhism are classified by Tiantai Buddhism as distinctive teaching (biejiao), not perfect teaching. This paper clarifies that the characteristics of (...)
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  19.  60
    Nishida Kitarō.John Maraldo - unknown
    Nishida Kitarō was the most significant and influential Japanese philosopher of the twentieth century. His work is pathbreaking in several respects: it established in Japan the creative discipline of philosophy as practiced in Europe and the Americas; it enriched that discipline by infusing Anglo European philosophy with Asian sources of thought; it provided a new basis for philosophical treatments of East Asian Buddhist thought; and it produced novel theories of self and world with rich implications for contemporary philosophizing. (...)'s work is also frustrating for its repetitive and often obscure style, exceedingly abstract formulations, and detailed but frequently dead end investigations. Nishida once said of his work, “I have always been a miner of ore; I have never managed to refine it” (Nishida 1958, Preface). A concise presentation of his achievements therefore will require extensive selection, interpretation and clarification. (shrink)
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  20.  10
    Nishida on the Beautiful and the Good.Robert Wilkinson - unknown
    Nishida analyses the relations of the ethical and aesthetic areas of life not in terms of types of concept or object but in terms of two types of consciousness. He holds that aesthetic and moral consciousness are radically different in kind, and both different from religious consciousness. Moral consciousness is the most superficial of the three, since it presupposes a duality not present in reality itself. Aesthetic consciousness has a tendency to unity, but is intermittent.
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  21.  40
    Nishida and Western Philosophy.Robert Wilkinson - 2009 - Ashgate.
    Nishida's starting point -- Radical empiricism and pure experience -- Fichte, the neo-Kantians, and Bergson -- Nishida's later philosophy: the logic of place and self-contradictory identity.
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  22.  4
    Nishida Kitaro.Yamamoto Seisaku & James W. Heisig (eds.) - 1991 - University of California Press.
    In recent years several books by major figures in Japan's modern philosophical tradition have appeared in English, exciting readers by their explorations of the borderlands between philosophy and religion. What has been wanting, however, is a book in a Western language to elucidate the life and thought of Nishida Kitaro, Japan's first philosopher of world stature and the originator of what has come to be called the Kyoto School. No one is more qualified to write such a book than (...)
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  23. Nishida Kitarō mikōkai nōto-rui kenkyū shiryōka.Hiroshi Asami, Yūta Nakajima & Sachiko Yamanada (eds.) - 2018 - Ishikawa-ken Kahoku-shi: Ishikawa-ken Nishida Kitarō Kinen Tetsugakukan.
     
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  24. Nishida, Notable Japanese Personalist.Raymond Frank Piper - 1936 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 17 (1):21.
     
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  25.  20
    Nishida Kitarô, l'école de Kyôto et l'ultra-nationalisme.Pierre Lavelle - 1994 - Revue Philosophique De Louvain 92 (4):430-458.
  26.  6
    Nishida’s Bow: Evaluating Nishida’s Wartime Actions.Elizabeth McManaman Tyler - 2019 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 11 (1):19-33.
    ABSTRACTThis paper examines Nishida’s later work on the historical world and religious transformation in an effort to clarify his political writings during the Pacific War. It sheds new light on the debate over the interpretation of Nishida’s wartime actions through reflection on a brief interaction Nishida had with the student Kiyoshi Kato during World War II. Shinran’s influence on Nishida will also be analyzed to reveal that the moral and religious insufficiency of the practitioner is a (...)
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  27.  16
    Reading Nishida Through Shinran.Elizabeth McManaman Grosz - 2016 - Journal of Buddhist Philosophy 2:172-186.
  28.  12
    Nishida Kitarô et la Philosophie du Japon.Michel Dalissier - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 29:171-181.
    le destin singulier de l’aventure philosophique japonaise du XXème siècle nous invite, avec son premier grand représentant, Nishida Kitarô (1870-1945), à un geste d’ « unification » spirituelle, s’illustrant tout d’abord par une lecture stupéfiante de l’histoire de la philosophie occidentale, méditant et critiquant tout à la fois la pensée orientale au sein de laquelle elle s’enracine. Mais ensuite, ces recherches singulières ont pour enjeu plus souterrain de s’enquêter du « lieu » même, au sein duquel une acception plus (...)
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  29.  30
    Nishida Kitarō's Chiasmatic Chorology: Place of Dialectic, Dialectic of Place.John W. M. Krummel - 2015 - Indiana University Press.
    Nishida Kitarō is considered Japan's first and greatest modern philosopher. As founder of the Kyoto School, he began a rigorous philosophical engagement and dialogue with Western philosophical traditions, especially the work of G. W. F. Hegel. John W. M. Krummel explores the Buddhist roots of Nishida’s thought and places him in connection with Hegel and other philosophers of the Continental tradition. Krummel develops notions of self-awareness, will, being, place, the environment, religion, and politics in Nishida’s thought and (...)
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  30.  42
    Nishida and Wittgenstein: From 'Pure Experience' to Lebensform or New Perspectives for a Philosophy of Intercultural Communication.Thorsten Botz-Bornstein - 2003 - Asian Philosophy 13 (1):53 – 70.
  31. The Unsolved Issue of Consciousness.Nishida Kitarō & John W. M. Krummel - 2012 - Philosophy East and West 62 (1):44-51.
    This essay by Nishida Kitarō from 1927, translated into English here for the first time, is from the initial period of what has come to be called “Nishida philosophy” (Nishida tetsugaku), when Nishida was first developing his conception of “place” (basho). Nishida here inquires into the relationship between logic and consciousness in terms of place and implacement in order to overcome the shortcomings of previous philosophical attempts—from the ancient Greeks to the moderns—to dualistically conceive the (...)
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  32.  20
    Nishida Kitaro’s Views on Japanese Culture.E. L. Skvortsova - 2018 - Russian Journal of Philosophical Sciences 8:46-66.
    Nishida Kitaro is a well-known Japanese philosopher whose work is marked by attempts to combine the world outlooks of the national spiritual tradition with elements of European philosophical thought. The article analyzes Nishida’s views on culture that are an independent part of his original philosophical theory. Religion, art, morality, science are the ideal forms of being in the historical world. The work of a scientist or artist is a manifestation of the formative activity of a person. The historical (...)
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  33.  49
    Nishida Kitaro's First Notion of Beauty.Montserrat Crespín Perales - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 29:129-138.
    Although we cannot find any Aesthetics system in the works of NISHIDA Kitarõ (1870-1945), the most significant and influential Japanese philosopher of the twentieth-century, one of his central themes is the role of art and aesthetics in relation with morality and religion. His aesthetics approaches are magnificent examples of his aim to overcome the innate dualism that sustains modern epistemology and a door, apparently hidden, to a better understanding of all his speculative scheme of philosophy. This paper attempts to (...)
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  34.  39
    Nishida Kitarô's First Notion of Beauty.Montserrat Crespín Perales - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 1:43-53.
    Although we cannot find any Aesthetics system in the works of NISHIDA Kitarõ (1870-1945), the most significant and influential Japanese philosopher of the twentieth-century, one of his central themes is the role of art and aesthetics in relation with morality and religion. His aesthetics approaches are magnificent examples of his aim to overcome the innate dualism that sustains modern epistemology and a door, apparently hidden, to a better understanding of all his speculative scheme of philosophy. This paper attempts to (...)
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  35.  91
    Nishida Kitarō: “Der Geschichtliche Leib”.Leon Krings - 2016 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 1:217-246.
    Original title : 「歴史的身体」『西田幾多郎全集』[Nishida Kitarō Gesamtausgabe], 3. Auflage, Tokyo, Iwanami Shoten, Bd. 14: 265–92.
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  36. Kitarō Nishida, An Inquiry Into the Good. [REVIEW]Robert Carter - 1991 - Philosophy in Review 11:280-281.
     
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  37. Kitarō Nishida, An Inquiry Into the Good Reviewed By.Robert E. Carter - 1991 - Philosophy in Review 11 (4):280-281.
     
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  38.  10
    Kitaro Nishida Bibliography.Lydia Brüll - 1988 - International Philosophical Quarterly 28 (4):373-381.
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  39.  29
    Nishida Kitarō: Place and Dialectic: Two Essays by Nishida Kitarō Trans. By John W. M. Krummel and Shigenori Nagatomo. Introduction by John W. M. Krummel: Oxford University Press, Oxford and New York, 2011, 272 Pp., $74.00. [REVIEW]Robert E. Carter - 2012 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 72 (1):67-70.
  40. Nishida, Agency, and the 'Self-Contradictory' Body.Joel W. Krueger - 2008 - Asian Philosophy 18 (3):213 – 229.
    In this essay, I investigate Kitarō Nishida's characterization of what he refers to as the 'self-contradictory' body. First, I clarify the conceptual relation between the self-contradictory body and Nishida's notion of 'acting-intuition'. I next look at Nishida's analysis of acting-intuition and the self-contradictory body as it pertains to our personal, sensorimotor engagement with the world and things in it, as well as to our bodily immersion within the intersubjective and social world. Along the way, I argue that (...)
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  41.  85
    Nishida on God, Barth and Christianity.Curtis A. Rigsby - 2009 - Asian Philosophy 19 (2):119 – 157.
    Despite the central role that the concept of God played in Kitarō Nishida's philosophy—and more broadly, within the Kyoto School which formed around Nishida—Anglophone studies of the religious philosophy of modern Japan have not seriously considered the nature and role of God in Nishida's thought. Indeed, relevant Anglophone studies even strongly suggest that where the concept of God does appear in Nishida's writings, such a concept is to be dismissed as a 'subjective fiction', a 'penultimate designation', (...)
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  42.  71
    Nishida’s Philosophy of “Place”.Masao Abe - 1988 - International Philosophical Quarterly 28 (4):355-371.
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  43. Nishida Kitarō, Sunshin No Shisō.Kan Sakurai - 2005 - Kanazawa-Shi Kokusai Bunkaka.
     
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  44.  45
    Nishida Kitarō’s Chiasmatic Chorology: Place of Dialectic: Dialectic of Place. [REVIEW]Elizabeth McManaman Grosz - 2018 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 10 (2):191-193.
  45.  19
    Nishida Among the Idealists.Matthew C. Altman - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (4):860-880.
    In his theoretical philosophy, Immanuel Kant argues that experience comes from two sources that are radically different but equally necessary: the rule-governed activity of thinking and the givenness of sensations. He supposes that both could be traced to some common root but concludes that whatever it is, is in principle unknowable. Kant's idealist successors, J.G. Fichte and F.W.J. Schelling, each attempt to provide a unified account of experience by identifying the ultimate basis of subject and object—Fichte by referring to the (...)
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  46. Nishida Kitarō's Awakened Realism.Ishihara Yuko - 2019 - Metodo. International Studies in Phenomenology and Philosophy 1:57-84.
    In this essay I present the philosophy of Nishida Kitarō, the father of the Kyoto School tradition, as an alternative version of transcendental philosophy. While following the steps of Kant and Husserl in important ways, Nishida attempts to take the transcendental approach even further, finally leaving us with a different view of reality that is neither realist nor idealist, but, rather, radically realist. I call this radical transcendental position, “awakened realism”. Due to word limitations, I can only set (...)
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  47.  42
    Nishida Kitarō, G.W.F. Hegel, and the Pursuit of the Concrete: A Dialectic of Dialectics.Lucy Schultz - 2012 - Philosophy East and West 62 (3):319-338.
    A comparison of the dialectical worldviews of Nishida and Hegel is made by developing the notion of dialectical ontology as concrete philosophy in which logic is understood to extend beyond the level of discourse to the point where knowledge and experience cease to be opposed. The differences between their dialectical methods are outlined, highlighting Hegel's emphasis on the actualization of self-consciousness and historical progress in contrast to Nishida's concepts of the dialectal universal "place," the external now, and the (...)
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  48. Nishida Kitarō’s Kōiteki Chokkan: Active Intuition and Contemporary Metaethics.Laura Specker Sullivan - forthcoming - In Colin Marshall (ed.), Comparative Metaethics: Neglected Perspectives on the Foundations of Morality. Routledge.
    I characterize Nishida Kitarō’s metaethical perspective throughout his work but focus especially on his later papers, most notably his writings on kōiteki chokkan, or active intuition. These include Kōiteki Chokkan no Tachiba (published in 1935), Kōiteki Chokkan (published in 1937), as well as Nothingness and the Religious Worldview (Bashoteki Ronri to Shūkyōteki Sekaikan, published in 1945, and widely available in translation). I explore affinities between Nishida’s approach to ethics and metaethical intuitionism and sensibility theory. I then use this (...)
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  49.  80
    Later Nishida on Self-Awareness: Have I Lost Myself Yet?Yuko Ishihara - 2011 - Asian Philosophy 21 (2):193 - 211.
    In this paper, I argue that later Nishida's analysis of self-awareness (jikaku) provides a new perspective on the nature of self-awareness as understood in the philosophical literature today. I argue that the contemporary literature deals with two kinds of self-awareness; the higher-order theory understands self-awareness to be an objectified awareness and the phenomenological tradition generally understands self-awareness to be, at least primarily, a non-objectified awareness. In light of this, I first give an account of Nishida's ?acting-intuition? with reference (...)
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  50.  13
    西田のいう「論理」を再考する (Nishida’s logic reconsidered).Tomomi Asakura - 2021 - Tetsugakuzasshi 135 (808):24-41.
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