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Nora S. Newcombe [18]Nora Newcombe [5]
  1.  23
    Picturing perspectives: development of perspective-taking abilities in 4- to 8-year-olds.Andrea Frick, Wenke Mã¶Hring & Nora S. Newcombe - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
  2.  47
    Five Reasons to Doubt the Existence of a Geometric Module.Alexandra D. Twyman & Nora S. Newcombe - 2010 - Cognitive Science 34 (7):1315-1356.
    It is frequently claimed that the human mind is organized in a modular fashion, a hypothesis linked historically, though not inevitably, to the claim that many aspects of the human mind are innately specified. A specific instance of this line of thought is the proposal of an innately specified geometric module for human reorientation. From a massive modularity position, the reorientation module would be one of a large number that organized the mind. From the core knowledge position, the reorientation module (...)
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  3.  13
    Where music meets space: Children’s sensitivity to pitch intervals is related to their mental spatial transformation skills.Wenke Möhring, Kizzann Ashana Ramsook, Kathryn Hirsh-Pasek, Roberta M. Golinkoff & Nora S. Newcombe - 2016 - Cognition 151 (C):1-5.
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  4.  12
    Exploration patterns shape cognitive map learning.Iva K. Brunec, Melissa M. Nantais, Jennifer E. Sutton, Russell A. Epstein & Nora S. Newcombe - 2023 - Cognition 233 (C):105360.
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  5.  21
    An adaptive cue combination model of human spatial reorientation.Yang Xu, Terry Regier & Nora S. Newcombe - 2017 - Cognition 163 (C):56-66.
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  6.  32
    Location memory in the real world: Category adjustment effects in 3-dimensional space.Mark P. Holden, Nora S. Newcombe & Thomas F. Shipley - 2013 - Cognition 128 (1):45-55.
  7.  21
    Move to learn: Integrating spatial information from multiple viewpoints.Corinne A. Holmes, Nora S. Newcombe & Thomas F. Shipley - 2018 - Cognition 178 (C):7-25.
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  8.  28
    Interpreting sex differences in lateralization.William J. Ray & Nora Newcombe - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (2):246-246.
  9.  17
    The hippocampus is not a geometric module: processing environment geometry during reorientation.Jennifer E. Sutton & Nora S. Newcombe - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  10.  20
    Seeing Like a Geologist: Bayesian Use of Expert Categories in Location Memory.Mark P. Holden, Nora S. Newcombe, Ilyse Resnick & Thomas F. Shipley - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (2):440-454.
    Memory for spatial location is typically biased, with errors trending toward the center of a surrounding region. According to the category adjustment model, this bias reflects the optimal, Bayesian combination of fine-grained and categorical representations of a location. However, there is disagreement about whether categories are malleable. For instance, can categories be redefined based on expert-level conceptual knowledge? Furthermore, if expert knowledge is used, does it dominate other information sources, or is it used adaptively so as to minimize overall error, (...)
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  11.  22
    Developing symbolic capacity one step at a time.Janellen Huttenlocher, Marina Vasilyeva, Nora Newcombe & Sean Duffy - 2008 - Cognition 106 (1):1-12.
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  12. Convergence and Divergence in Representational Systems: Emergent Place Learning and Language in Toddlers.Frances Balcomb, Nora Newcombe & Katrina Ferrara - 2009 - In N. A. Taatgen & H. van Rijn (eds.), Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society.
     
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  13. Spatial cognition.Nora S. Newcombe - 2002 - In J. Wixted & H. Pashler (eds.), Stevens' Handbook of Experimental Psychology. Wiley.
  14.  17
    Measuring Spatial Perspective Taking: Analysis of Four Measures Using Item Response Theory.Maria Brucato, Andrea Frick, Stefan Pichelmann, Alina Nazareth & Nora S. Newcombe - 2023 - Topics in Cognitive Science 15 (1):46-74.
    Research on spatial thinking requires reliable and valid measures of individual differences in various component skills. Spatial perspective taking (PT)—the ability to represent viewpoints different from one's own—is one kind of spatial skill that is especially relevant to navigation. This study had two goals. First, the psychometric properties of four PT tests were examined: Four Mountains Task (FMT), Spatial Orientation Task (SOT), Perspective-Taking Task for Adults (PTT-A), and Photographic Perspective-Taking Task (PPTT). Using item response theory (IRT), item difficulty, discriminability, and (...)
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  15.  15
    Measuring Spatial Perspective Taking: Analysis of Four Measures Using Item Response Theory.Maria Brucato, Andrea Frick, Stefan Pichelmann, Alina Nazareth & Nora S. Newcombe - 2023 - Topics in Cognitive Science 15 (1):46-74.
    Research on spatial thinking requires reliable and valid measures of individual differences in various component skills. Spatial perspective taking (PT)—the ability to represent viewpoints different from one's own—is one kind of spatial skill that is especially relevant to navigation. This study had two goals. First, the psychometric properties of four PT tests were examined: Four Mountains Task (FMT), Spatial Orientation Task (SOT), Perspective-Taking Task for Adults (PTT-A), and Photographic Perspective-Taking Task (PPTT). Using item response theory (IRT), item difficulty, discriminability, and (...)
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  16.  22
    Commentary on Leibovich et al.: What next?Kelly S. Mix, Nora S. Newcombe & Susan C. Levine - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
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  17.  35
    A spatial coding analysis of the a-not-b error: What IS “location at a”?Nora S. Newcombe - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (1):57-58.
    Thelen et al. criticize “spatial coding” approaches to the A-not-B error. However, newer thinking about spatial coding provides more precise analytic categories and recognizes that different spatial coding systems normally coexist. Theorizing about spatial coding is largely compatible with dynamic-systems theory, augmenting it with an analysis of what one means when discussing “location at A” (or B).
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  18.  13
    Building a Cognitive Science of Human Variation: Individual Differences in Spatial Navigation.Nora S. Newcombe, Mary Hegarty & David Uttal - 2023 - Topics in Cognitive Science 15 (1):6-14.
    This issue assesses how human spatial navigation differs: within individuals across short‐term variations in mood or stress, and between individuals across variations in age, gender, education, culture, and physical environment.
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  19.  24
    Nature/nurture in male/female mathematical giftedness.Nora Newcombe & Mary Ann Baenninger - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (2):206-206.
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  20.  25
    Sexual-selection accounts of human characteristics: Just So Stories or scientific hypotheses?Nora Newcombe & Mary Ann Baenninger - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):259-260.
    We evaluate three of Geary's claims, finding that there is little evidence for sex differences in object- vs. person-orientation; sex differences in competition, even if biologically caused, lead to sex differences in mathematics only given a certain style of teaching; and sex differences in mental rotation, though real, are not well explained in a sociobiological framework or by the proximate biological variables assumed by Geary.
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  21. A matter of trust: when landmarks and geometry are used during reorientation.Kristin R. Ratliff & Nora S. Newcombe - 2007 - In McNamara D. S. & Trafton J. G. (eds.), Proceedings of the 29th Annual Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society. pp. 581.
     
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  22.  15
    First Direct Evidence of Cue Integration in Reorientation: A New Paradigm.Alexandra D. Twyman, Mark P. Holden & Nora S. Newcombe - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (S3):923-936.
    There are several models of the use of geometric and feature cues in reorientation. The adaptive combination approach posits that people integrate cues with weights that depend on cue salience and learning, or, when discrepancies are large, they choose between cues based on these variables. In a new paradigm designed to evaluate integration and choice, disoriented participants attempted to return to a heading direction, in a trapezoidal enclosure in which feature and geometric cues both unambiguously specified a heading, but later (...)
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  23.  26
    Are all types of vertical information created equal?Steven M. Weisberg & Nora S. Newcombe - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (5):568 - 569.
    The vertical component of space occurs in two distinct fashions in natural environments. One kind of verticality is orthogonal-to-horizontal (as in climbing trees, operating in volumetric spaces such as water or air, or taking elevators in multilevel buildings). Another kind of verticality, which might be functionally distinct, comes from navigating on sloped terrain (as in traversing hills or ramps).
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