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  1.  6
    Individual Choose-to-Transmit Decisions Reveal Little Preference for Transmitting Negative or High-Arousal Content.Florian van Leeuwen, Nora Parren, Helena Miton & Pascal Boyer - 2018 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 18 (1-2):124-153.
    Research on social transmission suggests that people preferentially transmit information about threats and social interactions. Such biases might be driven by the arousal that is experienced as part of the emotional response triggered by information about threats or social relationships. The current studies tested whether preferences for transmitting threat-relevant information are consistent with a functional motive to recruit social support. USA residents were recruited for six online studies. Studies 1a and 1B showed that participants more often chose to transmit positive, (...)
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  2.  12
    The Cognitive Naturalness of Witchcraft Beliefs: An Exploration of the Existing Literature.Nora Parren - 2017 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 17 (5):396-418.
    Cross-culturally, misfortune is often attributed to witchcraft despite the high human and social costs of these beliefs. The evolved cognitive features that are often used to explain religion more broadly, in combination with threat perception and coalitional psychology, may help explain why these particular supernatural beliefs are so prevalent. Witches are minimally counter intuitive, agentic, and build upon intuitive understandings of ritual efficacy. Witchcraft beliefs may gain traction in threatening contexts and because they are threatening themselves, while simultaneously activating coalitional (...)
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  3.  15
    The Moral Psychology Handbook.Justin E. Lane & Nora Parren - 2013 - Philosophical Psychology 26 (5):765-768.