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  1.  79
    Britain's Religious Tribunals: 'Joint Governance' in Practice.Russell Sandberg, Gillian Douglas, Norman Doe, Sophie Gilliat-Ray & Asma Khan - 2013 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 33 (2):263-291.
    In recent years, there have been a number of moral panics in Western societies about the existence of religious courts and tribunals in general and Shariah law in particular. In England and Wales, these concerns came to the fore following the 2008 lecture by the then Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Rowan Williams, on ‘Civil Law and Religious Law in England’. In that lecture, Williams drew upon the work of the Canadian scholar Ayelet Shachar endorsing her concept of ‘transformative accommodation’. In (...)
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    Sharia Tribunals, Rabbinical Courts, and Christian Panels: Religious Arbitration in America and the West by Michael J. Broyde, Oxford University Press, New York, 2017, Pp. XXVI + 282, Hbk. [REVIEW]Norman Doe - 2019 - New Blackfriars 100 (1089):621-623.
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    Richard Hooker, of the Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity: A Critical Edition with Modern Spelling Edited by Arthur Stephenmcgrade, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2013, Vol. I, Pp. Cxiv + 242, Vol. II, Pp. VIII + 334, Vol. III, Pp. VIII + 418, £275.00, Hbk. [REVIEW]Norman Doe - 2015 - New Blackfriars 96 (1064):513-515.
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  4. Comparative Religious Law: Judaism, Christianity, Islam.Norman Doe - 2018 - Cambridge University Press.
    Comparative Religious Law provides for the first time a study of the regulatory instruments of Jewish, Christian and Muslim religious organisations in Britain in light of their historical religious laws. Norman Doe questions assumptions about the pervasiveness, character and scope of religious laws, from the view that they are not or should not be recognised by civil law, to the idea that there may be a fundamental incompatibility between religious and civil law. It proposes that religious laws pervade society, are (...)
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  5. 15th-Century Concepts of Law, Fortescue and Pecock.Norman Doe - 1989 - History of Political Thought 10 (2):257-280.