Results for 'Norman McLeod'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  3
    Existential Freedom in the Marxism of Jean-Paul Sartre.Norman McLeod - 1968 - Dialogue 7 (1):26-44.
  2.  13
    Can There Be a Just War?: Norman Can There Be a Just War?Richard Norman - 2004 - Think 3 (8):7-16.
    Richard Norman examines justifications for war that are rooted in the right of self-defence.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  2
    Applied Ethics: What is Applied to What?: Richard Norman.Richard Norman - 2000 - Utilitas 12 (2):119-136.
    This paper criticizes the conception of applied ethics as the top-down application of a theory to practical issues. It is argued that a theory such as utilitarianism cannot override our intuitive moral perceptions. We cannot be radically mistaken about the kinds of considerations which count as practical reasons, and it is the task of theoretical ethics to articulate the basic kinds of considerations which we appeal to in practical discussions. Dworkin's model of doing ethics ‘from the inside out’ is used (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  2
    The Primacy of Practice: ‘Intelligent Idealism’ in Marxist Thought1: Richard Norman.Richard Norman - 1982 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 13:155-179.
    The chief defect of all previous materialism is that things, reality, the sensible world, are conceived only in the form of objects of observation , but not as human sense activity , not as practical activity , not subjectively. Hence, in opposition to materialism, the active side was developed abstractly by idealism, which of course does not know real sense activity as such.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  7
    Technology, Crisis, and Interaction Design: A Conversation with Bruce Sterling, Donald Norman, and Derrick de Kerckhove.Lorenzo Imbesi, Bruce Sterling, Donald Norman & Derrick de Kerckhove - 2010 - Mediatropes 2 (2):128-135.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  1
    Can Belief in God Be Confirmed?: MARK S. MCLEOD.Mark S. Mcleod - 1988 - Religious Studies 24 (3):311-323.
    A basic thrust behind Alvin Plantinga's position that belief in God is properly basic is an analogy between certain non-religious beliefs such as ‘I see a tree’ and theistic beliefs such as ‘God made this flower’. Each kind of belief is justified for a believer, argues Plantinga, when she finds herself in a certain set of conditions. Richard Grigg challenges this claim by arguing that while the non-religious beliefs are confirmed, beliefs about God are not. I wish to explore this (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Knowledge of Necessity: Logical Positivism and Kripkean Essentialism: Stephen K. McLeod.Stephen K. Mcleod - 2008 - Philosophy 83 (2):179-191.
    By the lights of a central logical positivist thesis in modal epistemology, for every necessary truth that we know, we know it a priori and for every contingent truth that we know, we know it a posteriori. Kripke attacks on both flanks, arguing that we know necessary a posteriori truths and that we probably know contingent a priori truths. In a reflection of Kripke's confidence in his own arguments, the first of these Kripkean claims is far more widely accepted than (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  82
    Self-Trust and Reproductive Autonomy.Carolyn McLeod - 2002 - MIT Press.
    The power of new medical technologies, the cultural authority of physicians, and the gendered power dynamics of many patient-physician relationships can all inhibit women's reproductive freedom. Often these factors interfere with women's ability to trust themselves to choose and act in ways that are consistent with their own goals and values. In this book Carolyn McLeod introduces to the reproductive ethics literature the idea that in reproductive health care women's self-trust can be undermined in ways that threaten their autonomy. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   22 citations  
  9.  6
    Gradations of Awareness in a Modified Sequence Learning Task.E. Norman, M. Price, S. Duff & R. Mentzoni - 2007 - Consciousness and Cognition 16 (4):809-837.
    We argue performance in the serial reaction time task is associated with gradations of awareness that provide examples of fringe consciousness [Mangan, B. . Taking phenomenology seriously: the “fringe” and its implications for cognitive research. Consciousness and Cognition, 2, 89–108, Mangan, B. . The conscious “fringe”: Bringing William James up to date. In B. J. Baars, W. P. Banks & J. B. Newman , Essential sources in the scientific study of consciousness . Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.], and address limitations (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   18 citations  
  10.  27
    Ethics, Killing, and War.Richard Norman - 1995 - Cambridge University Press.
    Can war ever be justified? Why is it wrong to kill? In this new book Richard Norman looks at these and other related questions, and thereby examines the possibility and nature of rational moral argument. Practical examples, such as the Gulf War and the Falklands War, are used to show that, whilst moral philosophy can offer no easy answers, it is a worthwhile enterprise which sheds light on many pressing contemporary problems. A combination of lucid exposition and original argument (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   14 citations  
  11.  10
    Free and Equal: A Philosophical Examination of Political Values.Richard Norman - 1987 - Oxford University Press.
    The concepts of freedom and equality lie at the heart of much contemporary political debate. But how, exactly, are these concepts to be understood? And do they really represent desirable political values? Norman begins from the premise that freedom and equality are rooted in human experience, and thus have a real and objective content. He then argues that the attempt to clarify these concepts is therefore not just a matter of idle philosophical speculation, but also a matter of practical (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  12.  4
    On Humanism.Richard Norman - 2004 - Routledge.
    humanism /'hju:menizm/ n. an outlook or system of thought concerned with human rather than divine or supernatural matters. Albert Einstein, Isaac Asimov, E.M. Forster, Bertrand Russell, and Gloria Steinem all declared themselves humanists. What is humanism and why does it matter? Is there any doctrine every humanist must hold? If it rejects religion, what does it offer in its place? Have the twentieth century's crimes against humanity spelled the end for humanism? On Humanism is a timely and powerfully argued philosophical (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  13.  77
    Modality and Anti-Metaphysics.Stephen K. McLeod - 2001 - Ashgate.
    Modality and Anti-Metaphysics critically examines the most prominent approaches to modality among analytic philosophers in the twentieth century, including essentialism. Defending both the project of metaphysics and the essentialist position that metaphysical modality is conceptually and ontologically primitive, Stephen McLeod argues that the logical positivists did not succeed in banishing metaphysical modality from their own theoretical apparatus and he offers an original defence of metaphysics against their advocacy of its elimination. -/- Seeking to assuage the sceptical worries which underlie (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  14.  39
    Can There Be a Just War?Richard Norman - 2004 - Think 3 (8):7.
    Richard Norman examines justifications for war that are rooted in the right of self-defence.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Referral in the Wake of Conscientious Objection to Abortion.Carolyn McLeod - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (4):pp. 30-47.
    Currently, the preferred accommodation for conscientious objection to abortion in medicine is to allow the objector to refuse to accede to the patient’s request so long as the objector refers the patient to a physician who performs abortions. The referral part of this arrangement is controversial, however. Pro-life advocates claim that referrals make objectors complicit in the performance of acts that they, the objectors, find morally offensive. McLeod argues that the referral requirement is justifiable, although not in the way (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  22
    Swinburne's Arguments From Design.Richard Norman - 2003 - Think 2 (4):35.
    In issue one, Richard Swinburne presented two ingenious versions of the argument from design. Here, Richard Norman questions both arguments.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  19
    Strategic Control in AGL is Not Attributable to Simple Letter Frequencies Alone.Elisabeth Norman, Mark C. Price, Emma Jones & Zoltan Dienes - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1933-1934.
    In Norman, Price, and Jones , we argued that the ability to apply two sets of grammar rules flexibly from trial to trial on a “mixed-block” AGL classification task indicated strategic control over knowledge that was less than fully explicit. Jiménez suggested that our results do not in themselves prove that participants learned – and strategically controlled – complex properties of the structures of the grammars, but that they may be accounted for by learning of simple letter frequencies. We (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  58
    Good Without God.Richard Norman - 2008 - Think 7 (20):35-46.
    In the fifth of our articles on , Richard Norman explains why he believes we can be good without God.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  18
    Rich Discussion About Reproductive Autonomy.Carolyn McLeod - 2009 - Bioethics 23 (1):ii-iii.
    An introduction to a special issue of Bioethics edited by McLeod and called Understanding and Protecting Reproductive Autonomy.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Nietzsche: Beyond Good and Evil: Prelude to a Philosophy of the Future.Rolf-Peter Horstmann & Judith Norman (eds.) - 2012 - Cambridge University Press.
    Beyond Good and Evil is one of the most scathing and powerful critiques of philosophy, religion, science, politics and ethics ever written. In it, Nietzsche presents a set of problems, criticisms and philosophical challenges that continue both to inspire and to trouble contemporary thought. In addition, he offers his most subtle, detailed and sophisticated account of the virtues, ideas, and practices which will characterize philosophy and philosophers of the future. With his relentlessly energetic style and tirelessly probing manner, Nietzsche embodies (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. The Logic of Our Language: An Introduction to Symbolic Logic.Rodger L. Jackson & Melanie L. McLeod - 2014 - Broadview Press.
    The Logic of Our Language teaches the practical and everyday application of formal logic. Rather than overwhelming the reader with abstract theory, Jackson and McLeod show how the skills developed through the practice of logic can help us to better understand our own language and reasoning processes. The authors' goal is to draw attention to the patterns and logical structures inherent in our spoken and written language by teaching the reader how to translate English sentences into formal symbols. Other (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Ethics, Killing and War.Richard Norman - 1995 - Cambridge University Press.
    Can war ever be justified? Why is it wrong to kill? In this new book Richard Norman looks at these and other related questions, and thereby examines the possibility and nature of rational moral argument. Practical examples, such as the Gulf War and the Falklands War, are used to show that, whilst moral philosophy can offer no easy answers, it is a worthwhile enterprise which sheds light on many pressing contemporary problems. A combination of lucid exposition and original argument (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. On Humanism.Richard Norman - 2015 - Routledge.
    What is humanism and why does it matter? Is there any doctrine every humanist must hold? If it rejects religion, what does it offer in its place? Have the twentieth century’s crimes against humanity spelled the end for humanism? On Humanism is a timely and powerfully argued philosophical defence of humanism. It is also an impassioned plea that we turn to ourselves, not religion, if we want to answer Socrates’ age-old question: what is the best kind of life to lead? (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. On Humanism.Richard Norman - 2012 - Routledge.
    What is humanism and why does it matter? Is there any doctrine every humanist must hold? If it rejects religion, what does it offer in its place? Have the twentieth century’s crimes against humanity spelled the end for humanism? On Humanism is a timely and powerfully argued philosophical defence of humanism. It is also an impassioned plea that we turn to ourselves, not religion, if we want to answer Socrates’ age-old question: what is the best kind of life to lead? (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  1
    The Cambridge History of Christianity: World Christianities C.1914-C.2000. Edited by Hugh McLeod.Norman Tanner - 2008 - Heythrop Journal 49 (5):886-887.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. Representations in Distributed Cognitive Tasks.Jianhui Zhang & Donald A. Norman - 1994 - Cognitive Science 18 (1):87-122.
  27.  22
    Ryle on 'the Problem of the Self'.Robert Norman - 1970 - Philosophical Studies 19:220-235.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  37
    Climate Change and Norman Daniels' Theory of Just Health: An Essay on Basic Needs. [REVIEW]Joseph Lacey - 2012 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (1):3-14.
    Norman Daniels, in applying Rawls’ theory of justice to the issue of human health, ideally presupposes that society exists in a state of moderate scarcity. However, faced with problems like climate change, many societies find that their state of moderate scarcity is increasingly under threat. The first part of this essay aims to determine the consequences for Daniels’ theory of just health when we incorporate into Rawls’ understanding of justice the idea that the condition of moderate scarcity can fail. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  29. The Letters of Baron Friedrich von Hügel and Professor Norman Kemp Smith.Friedrich Hügel, Norman Kemp Smith & Lawrence F. Barmann - 1981 -
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  76
    A Discussion Between Wittgenstein and Moore on Certainty : From the Notes of Norman Malcolm.Ludwig Wittgenstein, G. E. Moore, Norman Malcolm & Gabriel Citron - 2015 - Mind 124 (493):73-84.
    In April 1939, G. E. Moore read a paper to the Cambridge University Moral Science Club entitled ‘Certainty’. In it, amongst other things, Moore made the claims that: the phrase ‘it is certain’ could be used with sense-experience-statements, such as ‘I have a pain’, to make statements such as ‘It is certain that I have a pain’; and that sense-experience-statements can be said to be certain in the same sense as some material-thing-statements can be — namely in the sense that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. Incorporating the Corporation in Citizenship: A Response to Néron and Norman.Andrew Crane & Dirk Matten - 2008 - Business Ethics Quarterly 18 (1):27-33.
    This article presents a response to Néron and Norman’s contention that the language of citizenship is helpful in thinking about the political dimensions of corporate responsibilities. We argue that Néron and Norman’s main conclusions are valid but offer an extension of their analysis to incorporate extant streams of literature dealing with the political role of the corporation. We also propose that the perspective on citizenship adopted by Néron and Norman is rather narrow, andtherefore provide some alternative ways (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  32.  20
    Reasoned Faith: Essays in Philosophical Theology in Honor of Norman Kretzmann.Eleonore Stump & Norman Kretzmann (eds.) - 1993 - Cornell University Press.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  33.  83
    What Shall We Do with Analytic Metaphysics? A Response to McLeod and Parsons.Heather Dyke & James Maclaurin - 2013 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 91 (1):179 - 182.
    (2013). What Shall We Do with Analytic Metaphysics? A Response to McLeod and Parsons. Australasian Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 91, No. 1, pp. 179-182. doi: 10.1080/00048402.2012.762029.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  34.  21
    The Distinction Between Intuition and Guessing in the SRT Task Generation: A Reply to Norman and Price.Qiufang Fu, Zoltán Dienes & Xiaolan Fu - 2010 - Consciousness and Cognition 19 (1):478-480.
    We investigated the extent to which people could generate sequences of responses based on knowledge acquired from the Serial Reaction Time task, depending on whether it felt subjectively like the response was based on pure guessing, intuition, conscious rules or memories. Norman and Price argued that in the context of our task, intuition responses were the same as guessing responses. In reply, we argue that not only do subjects apparently claim to be experiencing different phenomenologies when saying intuition versus (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  35.  26
    Norman and Truetemp Revisited Reliabilistically: A Proper Functionalist Defeat Account of Clairvoyance.Harmen Ghijsen - 2016 - Episteme 13 (1):89-110.
    The cases of Norman the Clairvoyant and Mr. Truetemp form classic counterexamples to the process reliabilist's claim that reliability is sufficient for prima facie justification. I discuss several ways in which contemporary reliabilists have tried to deal with these counterexamples, and argue that they are all unsuccessful. Instead, I propose that the most promising route lies with an appeal to a specific kind of higher-order defeat that is best cashed out in terms of properly functioning monitoring mechanisms.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  26
    Norman Bowie and Richard Rorty on Multinationals: Does Business Ethics Need 'Metaphysical Comfort?'. [REVIEW]Andrew C. Wicks - 1990 - Journal of Business Ethics 9 (3):191 - 200.
    Norman Bowie wrote an article on the moral obligations of multinational corporations in 1987. This paper is a response to Bowie, but more importantly, it is designed to articulate the force and substance of the pragmatist philosophy developed by Richard Rorty. In his article, Bowie suggested that moral universalism (which he endorses) is the only credible method of doing business ethics across cultures and that cultural relativism and ethnocentrism are not. Bowie, in a manner surprisingly common among contemporary philosophers, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  37. A Questionable Project: Herbert McLeod and the Making of the Fourth Series of the Royal Society Catalogue of Scientific Papers, 1901–25. [REVIEW]Hannah Gay - 2013 - Annals of Science 70 (2):149-174.
    Summary Many people were involved in producing the seven volumes that make up the fourth series of the Royal Society catalogue of scientific papers. Included were about two hundred volunteers and about one hundred people working either on short-term contracts or carrying out piece work. At the Royal Society there was a small, largely female, secretariat working full-time. It included both clerical and bibliographic staff. Coordinating all the work was the chemist Herbert McLeod, appointed director of the catalogue in (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  38.  20
    Aquinas's Moral Theory: Essays in Honor of Norman Kretzmann.Norman Kretzmann, Scott MacDonald & Eleonore Stump (eds.) - 1998 - Cornell University Press.
    This volume explores the ethical dimensions of a wide selection of philosophical and theological topics in Aquinas's texts.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  39.  18
    Age Rationing and Prudential Lifespan Account in Norman Daniels' Just Health.S. Brauer - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (1):27-31.
    Could age be a valid criterion for rationing? In Just health, Norman Daniels argues that under certain circumstances age rationing is prudent, and therefore a morally permissible strategy to tackle the problem of resource scarcity. Crucial to his argument is the distinction between two problem-settings of intergenerational equity: equity among age groups and equity among birth cohorts. While fairness between age groups can involve unequal benefit treatment in different life stages, fairness between birth cohorts implies enjoying approximate equality in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  40.  14
    Norman Sieroka: Leibniz, Husserl, and the Brain. [REVIEW]Kristjan Laasik - 2015 - Phenomenological Reviews.
    Norman Sieroka’s book is about “the systematic, structural relations between phenomenological and (neuro)physiological aspects of perception, consciousness, and time, with a specific focus on hearing” (p. 4), based on Leibniz’s and Husserl’s views. While Sieroka displays a great depth of knowledge in his discussions of these two philosophers, his main aims are not exegetic, but consist, rather, in casting new light on the said philosophical and interdisciplinary issues. However, the scope of his interpretative project is ambitious. There is, on (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  82
    What Concept of Disease Should Politicians Use? Norman Daniels and the Unjustifiable Appeal of Naturalistic Analyses of Health.Michele Loi - unknown -
    Norman Daniels argues that health is important for justice because it affects the distribution of opportunities. He claims that a just society should guarantee fair opportunities by promoting and restoring the “normal functioning” of its citizens, that is, their health. The scope of citizens' mutual obligations with respect to health is defined by a reasonable agreement that, according to Daniels, should be based on the distinction between normal functioning and pathology drawn by the biomedical sciences. This paper deals with (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  64
    Norman Kretzmann on Aquinas's Attribution of Will and of Freedom to Create to God.John F. Wippel - 2003 - Religious Studies 39 (3):287-298.
    The purpose of this paper is to discuss Norman Kretzmann's account of Aquinas's discussion of will in God. According to Kretzmann, Aquinas's reasoning seems to leave no place for choice on God's part, since, on Aquinas's account, God is not free not to will Himself. And so this leads to the problem about God's willing things other than Himself. On this, Kretzmann finds serious problems with Thomas's position. Kretzmann argues that Aquinas should have drawn necessitarian conclusions from his account (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  54
    Make/Believing the World(S): Toward a Christian Ontological Pluralism * By Mark S. McLeod-Harrison.D. Efird - 2011 - Analysis 71 (2):404-406.
    ‘We believe in one God, the Father, the Almighty, maker of heaven and earth’, so Christians confess when they recite the Nicene Creed. Now if the argument of Mark S. McLeod-Harrison’s Make/Believing the World: Toward a Christian Ontological Pluralism is correct, God is not alone in that task. We human beings are makers of heaven and earth, too, in the sense that what exists is as it is because our minds have made it so, which is a kind of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  6
    1066: The Moment of Transition in Two Narratives of the Norman Conquest.Monika Otter - 1999 - Speculum 74 (3):565-586.
    The year 1066, touted in the British humor classic 1066 and All That as one of only two truly “historical” dates , has assumed for us the character of a watershed in English history, a crucial moment of change and transformation. Indeed, the date is so memorable that the number 1066 itself can stand on its own, metonymically implying the Battle of Hastings, the accession of William to the English throne, the Norman Conquest, the end of Anglo-Saxon culture, the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  45.  11
    Norman Daniels. Just Health. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008. 397 + Ix Pp.T. M. Wilkinson - 2008 - Public Health Ethics 1 (3):phn028.
    Just Health, by the well-known American philosopher Norman Daniels, has the ambitious goal of presenting `an integrated theory of justice and population health, to address a set of theoretical and real-world challenges to that theory, and to demonstrate that the theory can guide our practice with regard to health both here and abroad.’ (1)1 Daniels's fundamental question is what we owe each other in the way of the protection and promotion of health. He thinks this is fruitfully dealt with (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  36
    Norman Daniels. Just Health.T. Wilkinson - 2008 - Public Health Ethics 1 (3):268-272.
    Just Health, by the well-known American philosopher Norman Daniels, has the ambitious goal of presenting ‘an integrated theory of justice and population health, to address a set of theoretical and real-world challenges to that theory, and to demonstrate that the theory can guide our practice with regard to health both here and abroad.’ (1)1 Daniels's fundamental question is what we owe each other in the way of the protection and promotion of health. He thinks this is fruitfully dealt with (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  37
    Review of J. Norman, After Euclid: Visual Reasoning and the Epistemology of Diagrams[REVIEW]F. Janet - 2007 - Philosophia Mathematica 15 (1):116-121.
    This monograph treats the important topic of the epistemology of diagrams in Euclidean geometry. Norman argues that diagrams play a genuine justificatory role in traditional Euclidean arguments, and he aims to account for these roles from a modified Kantian perspective. Norman considers himself a semi-Kantian in the following broad sense: he believes that Kant was right that ostensive constructions are necessary in order to follow traditional Euclidean proofs, but he wants to avoid appealing to Kantian a priori intuition (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  13
    What Shall We Do with Norman? An Experiment in Communal Discernment.C. W. Freeman - 1996 - Christian Bioethics 2 (1):16-41.
    We were a group of Christian friends searching for affirmations that lay at the heart of our faith and reached to the limits of our existence and moral authority. As we have reflected on our role in deciding whether and to what extent we could assist in allowing our terminally ill friend, seventy-nine-year-old, Norman to die, we were deeply troubled by the moral ambiguity of our involvement. Through a careful process of authority through communal discernment, our responsibility for (...) became clear: we were to assist him in living the life he embraced in baptism — a life which included a destiny that was conformed to the crucified and risen one. That was not the destiny we chose for Norman; it was the destiny he owned. We recognized with Norman that our lives are not our own to be guided by autonomy and liberty, but rather to be lived for the glory of Jesus the Christ. (shrink)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  17
    Justice Between Age-Groups: A Comment on Norman Daniels.Dennis Mckerlie - 1989 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 6 (2):227-234.
    ABSTRACT Norman Daniels suggests that the just distribution of resources between different age‐groups is determined by the choice a prudential agent would make in budgeting resources over the different temporal stages of a single life. He calls this view the “prudential lifespan account” of justice between age‐groups. Daniels thinks that the view recommends a rough kind of equality in resources between age‐groups. I argue that in the case of a single life prudence would choose an unequal distribution of resources. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  50.  1
    Memory as Direct Awareness of the Past: Norman Malcolm.Norman Malcolm - 1975 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 9:1-22.
    The philosophy of memory has been largely dominated by what could be called ‘the representative theory of memory’. In trying to give an account of ‘what goes on in one's mind’ when one remembers something, or of what ‘the mental content of remembering’ consists, philosophers have usually insisted that there must be some sort of mental image, picture, or copy of what is remembered. Aristotle said that there must be ‘something like a picture or impression’; William James thought that there (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000