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Norman Swartz [33]Norman M. Swartz [1]Norman Manuel Swartz [1]Normans Swartz [1]
  1.  13
    The Concept of Physical Law.Norman Swartz - 1985 - Cambridge University Press.
    The Concept of Physical Law is an original and creative defense of the Regularity theory of physical law, the concept that physical laws are nothing more than descriptions of whatever universal truths happen to be instanced in nature. Professor Swartz clearly identifies and analyzes the arguments and intuitions of the opposing Necessitarian theory, and argues that the standard objection to the Regularity theory turns on a mistaken view of what Regularists mean by 'physical impossibility'; that it is impossible to construct (...)
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  2.  17
    Laws of Nature.Norman Swartz - 1997 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 57 (4):971-973.
  3. Possible Worlds.Raymond Bradley & Normans Swartz - 1982 - Philosophical Quarterly 32 (129):382-383.
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  4. A Neo-Humean Perspective: Laws as Regularities.Norman Swartz - unknown
    I was seven or eight years old. In Hebrew school we had just learned the Aleph-Bet and were, haltingly, beginning to sound out words. As we spoke the ancient text, our teacher translated: "... And God said: 'Let there be light.' And there was light. ..."[note 2] Here was magic; here was the supernatural; here was the creation of the universe. I resonated to the story. I was filled with wonder, far more than had ever been elicited by any fairy (...)
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  5. Laws of Nature.Norman Swartz - 2001 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research.
    Within metaphysics, there are two competing theories of Laws of Nature. On one account, the Regularity Theory, Laws of Nature are statements of the uniformities or regularities in the world; they are mere descriptions of the way the world is. On the other account, the Necessitarian Theory, Laws of Nature are the “principles” which govern the natural phenomena of the world. That is, the natural world “obeys” the Laws of Nature. This seemingly innocuous difference marks one of the most profound (...)
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  6.  19
    Laws of Nature. [REVIEW]Norman Swartz - 1997 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 57 (4):971-973.
  7. Beyond Experience: Metaphysical Theories and Philosophical Constraints.Norman Swartz - 1991 - University of Toronto Press.
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  8.  30
    Can the Theory of Contingent Identity Between Sensation-States and Brain-States Be Made Empirical?Norman Swartz - 1974 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 3 (3):405-17.
    Since its inception, roughly sixteen years ago, the theory of the contingent identity of mental-states and brain-states has been argued on many fronts. I want here to examine and to try to meet one in particular of the objections raised in connection with this theory. The objection has been stated with especial force by Peter Herbst.Let us then investigate a proposition that there is a particular mental entity which is contingently identical with a particular brain state. In order to be (...)
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  9. Foreknowledge and Free Will.Norman M. Swartz - 2004 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Suppose it were known, by someone else, what you are going to choose to do tomorrow. Wouldn't that entail that tomorrow you must do what it was known in advance that you would do? In spite of your deliberating and planning, in the end, all is futile: you must choose exactly as it was earlier known that you would. The supposed exercise of your free will is ultimately an illusion. Historically, the tension between foreknowledge and the exercise of free will (...)
     
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  10. Is There an Ozma-Problem for Time?Norman Swartz - 1973 - Analysis 33 (3):77 - 82.
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  11. Definitions, Dictionaries, and Meanings.Norman Swartz - manuscript
    7.3.1 Ostension 7.3.2 Extensional Definition by Naming 7.3.3 Extensional Definition by Unique Description 7.4 Two Case Studies in the Application of the Intension/Extension Distinction 7.4.1 "God exists, by definition" 7.4.2 The 'Width' of an Intensional Definition..
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  12. Lecture Notes on Free Will and Determinism.Norman Swartz - manuscript
    For an expansion of the discussion of Sections 2-5 (Logical Determinism, Epistemic Determinism, and Modal Concepts) see Foreknowledge and Free Will ", in the Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  13. Bradley H. Dowden, Logical Reasoning Reviewed By.Norman Swartz - 1995 - Philosophy in Review 15 (2):91-94.
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  14. Bradley H. Dowden, Logical Reasoning. [REVIEW]Norman Swartz - 1995 - Philosophy in Review 15:91-94.
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  15. Pascal Engel, The Norm of Truth: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Logic Reviewed By.Norman Swartz - 1993 - Philosophy in Review 13 (2):86-88.
     
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  16. Denis J. Hilton, Ed., Contemporary Science and Natural Explanation: Commonsense Conceptions of Causality Reviewed By.Norman Swartz - 1988 - Philosophy in Review 8 (9):346-348.
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  17.  52
    First Set of Practice Exercises on Necessary Conditions and Sufficient Conditions.Norman Swartz - manuscript
    Definition: A condition A is said to be sufficient for a condition B, if (and only if) the truth (/existence /occurrence) [as the case may be] of A guarantees (or brings about) the truth (/existence /occurrence) of B.
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  18.  49
    Absolute Probability in Small Worlds: A New Paradox in Probability Theory.Norman Swartz - 1973 - Philosophia 3 (2-3):167-178.
    For a finite universe of discourse, if Φ → and ~(Ψ → Φ) , then P(Ψ) > P(Φ), i.e., there is always a loss of information, there is an increase in probability, in a non reversible implication. But consider the two propositions, "All ravens are black", (i.e., "(x)(Rx ⊃ Bx)"), and "Some ravens are black" (i.e., "(∃x)(Rx & Bx)"). In a world of one individual, called "a", these two propositions are equivalent to "~Ra ∨ Ba" and "Ra & Ba" respectively. (...)
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  19.  46
    The Bearers of Truth-Values.Norman Swartz - manuscript
    Thesis: Such things as beliefs, statements, assertions, remarks, hypotheses, and theories are those things that are true or false . (Example: we do say such things as "Her belief that her mother had phoned was false." Or, "His assertion that Alberta is smaller than British Columbia is true.").
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  20.  35
    Explanation, Causation And.Norman Swartz - unknown
    Wilson has returned to a debate whose heyday was the fifties and early sixties. He staunchly aligns himself with the deductivists, philosophers such as Popper, Hempel, Bergmann, and Braithwaite, who argued that scientific and historical explanations presuppose general laws and statements of initial conditions from which explanandum statements are validly deduced.
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  21.  21
    Baffling Phenomena and Other Studies in the Philosophy of Knowledge and Valuation.Norman Swartz - 1993 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 53 (1):224-229.
  22.  33
    Alphabetizing da a T.Norman Swartz - manuscript
    As children in elementary school we were taught to recite the alphabet in order: “Aay, Bee, See, Dee, Eii, Eff, Ghee, Aaych, …, Why and Zee”. There is nothing natural about this particular ordering: it is strictly a matter of convention. (When and where it was settled upon I haven’t the remotest notion.) Then, having mastered the ordering, we were taught to apply that knowledge to alphabetize lists of words. The procedure is surprisingly complex, and its mastery by mere eight-year (...)
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  23.  25
    On Reducing the Number of Possible Worlds.Norman Swartz - 1974 - Dialogue 13 (1):111-112.
    In his paper, "The Two Main Problems of Philosophy"[Note 1], Professor N.L. Wilson offers an inductive argument for the thesis "that there is only one possible world … possibility, actuality and necessity collapse into each other."[p. 200].
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  24.  19
    Getting From P to Q: Valid Inferences and Heuristics.Norman Swartz - 1993 - Dialogue 32 (4):689-.
    Epistemologists have known for two-and-a-half centuries that there are serious difficulties surroundingnon-demonstrativeinference. The best-known problem,theproblem of induction, was first diagnosed by Hume in theTreatise. In our own century, several more problems were added, e.g., by Hempel —the paradox of the ravens—and by Goodman —the “new,” or exacerbated, problem of induction. But an even greater blow lay ahead: within the decade after Goodman's problem appeared, Gettier was to publish his famous challenge to the traditional analysis of knowledge which, again, underscored how (...)
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  25.  12
    Reply to Ruse.Norman Swartz - 1988 - Dialogue 27 (3):529.
    In Chapters 10 and 11, I was privileged to act as amanuensis to a visiting Martian and to transcribe his lectures which, the truth be told, embodied views remarkably similar to my own. Ruse, in a playful vein, wonders “why this Martian would go to British Columbia to do philosophy”. I must admit that I do not really know the answer. I can only speculate that it might be for the same reasons that so many philosophers in Eastern Canada have (...)
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  26.  20
    The Obdurate Persistence of Rationalism.Norman Swartz - manuscript
    Marcus J. is a mathematician extraordinaire. Because it is no longer politically correct to use ivory, the tower in which he is hermetically sealed is made of recycled plastics. In his tower, walled off from the rest of the world, he pursues mathematics. Having started out modestly with theorizing that flipping two coins will yield two heads with a probability of 25%, he has lately gone on to more ambitious projects. Most recently he has published a paper, earning wide acclaim, (...)
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  27.  19
    'The' Modal Fallacy.Norman Swartz - manuscript
    Note: the technical vocabulary used in this article is explained in a glossary that I prepared for my introductory logic course in 1997.
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  28.  15
    Topology in Informal Logic: Slippery Slopes and Black Holes.Norman Swartz - 1995 - Dialogue 34 (4):797-.
    The commonalities of Douglas Walton's Slippery Slope Arguments and James Davies's Ways of Thinking are obvious: both are written by Canadian philosophers; both lie within the broad field of informal logic; and both make appeals in support of dialogical reasoning. But there the similarities end. The former is the work of a prolific author writing a treatise focussing narrowly on one topic within informal logic; the latter is the product of a newcomer to book-writing, and his is a textbook intended (...)
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  29.  50
    Emergence and Materialist Theories of Sentience.Norman Swartz - 1975 - World Futures 14 (3):241-267.
    CONTEMPORARY MATERIALIST theories of mind, viz. Causal Correspondence and Identity, are usually contrasted with several alleged historical competitors: Parallelism; Epiphenomenalism; Dual-aspect; and Emergence. What I shall here attempt to argue is that this last-mentioned theory, Emergence, is no competitor at all, but rather is a natural supplement to a materialist theory. I shall try to argue that there is a good case for saying that if, in particular, sensation-states are caused by or are identical to brain-states, then they are caused (...)
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  30. Spatial Worlds and Temporal Worlds: Could There Be More Than One of Each?Norman Swartz - 1975 - Ratio (Misc.) 17 (2):217.
     
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  31. Fred Wilson, Explanation, Causation and Deduction Reviewed By.Norman Swartz - 1986 - Philosophy in Review 6 (9):456-458.
     
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  32.  2
    Fred Wilson, Explanation, Causation and Deduction. [REVIEW]Norman Swartz - 1986 - Philosophy in Review 6:456-458.
  33.  9
    The Presuppositions of Empirical Research.Norman Swartz - manuscript
    A carpet vendor has to measure her customer's living room for some new broadloom. She has forgotten her tape measure, but does have a meterstick. She lays the meterstick on the floor, snug up against the wall, with the left edge of the stick in one corner of the room. She then makes a pencil mark at the right edge. Next she shifts the stick right until the left edge of the stick is at her mark, and again marks the (...)
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  34.  31
    Can Existence and Nomicity Devolve From Axiological Principles?Norman Swartz - 1993 - Electronic Journal of Analytic Philosophy 1.
    [1] The venerable question "Why is there anything (rather than nothing) at all?" has become particularly topical after a long absence from the philosophical scene. In 1981, it elicited a novel, and rather startling, response from Robert Nozick (Nozick 1981: 115-64). Since then, it has received steady attention from a number of astrophysicists, in particular, those promoting one version or another of an Anthropic Principle (see e.g. Barrow et al. 1986). [2] In the midst of this activity, a small volume (...)
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  35.  15
    A Guide for the Disputatious.Norman Swartz - 1991 - Dialogue 30 (1-2):123-.
    It is obvious that teaching and research in informal logic is a growth industry, indeed one of burgeoning proportions. Judging by skyrocketing enrolments and the avalanche of books, journals, computer aids, conferences, and workshops during the last decade, it would seem to be no passing fad but the overdue recognition of a societal need.
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