Results for 'Northwest England'

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  1. David Hume on Religion in England.Religion In England - 1991 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 66 (260):51.
     
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  2.  18
    Generating Regional-Scale Improvements in SME Corporate Responsibility Performance: Lessons From Responsibility Northwest.Sarah Roberts, Rob Lawson & Jeremy Nicholls - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 67 (3):275-286.
    This paper describes the research carried out into small and medium enterprises (SMEs) and corporate responsibility (CR) in the Northwest of England during Phase I of Responsibility Northwest, a partnership programme designed to significantly increase the CR of the region. By engaging with significant numbers of SMEs and SME support providers across the region, key insights were gained in three key areas: • The current attitudes to, understanding of, and management of CR issues in the SME sector.• (...)
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  3.  50
    Substitute Decision Making in Medicine: Comparative Analysis of the Ethico-Legal Discourse in England and Germany. [REVIEW]Ralf J. Jox, Sabine Michalowski, Jorn Lorenz & Jan Schildmann - 2008 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (2):153-163.
    Health care decision making for patients without decisional capacity is ethically and legally challenging. Advance directives (living wills) have proved to be of limited usefulness in clinical practice. Therefore, academic attention should focus more on substitute decision making by the next of kin. In this article, we comparatively analyse the legal approaches to substitute medical decision making in England and Germany. Based on the current ethico-legal discourse in both countries, three aspects of substitute decision making will be highlighted: (1) (...)
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  4.  40
    Agronomist–Farmer Knowledge Encounters: An Analysis of Knowledge Exchange in the Context of Best Management Practices in England[REVIEW]Julie Ingram - 2008 - Agriculture and Human Values 25 (3):405-418.
    This paper explores how knowledge is exchanged between agricultural advisors and farmers in the context of sustainable farming practices in England. Specifically the paper examines the nature of the knowledge exchange at the encounters between one group of advisors, agronomists, and farmers. The promotion of best management practices, which are central to the implementation of sustainable agricultural policies in England, provide the empirical context for this study. The paper uses the notion of expert and facilitative approaches as a (...)
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  5.  9
    Felonia Felonice Facta: Felony and Intentionality in Medieval England.Elizabeth Papp Kamali - 2015 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 9 (3):397-421.
    This paper explores the meaning of the word “felony” in thirteenth and fourteenth century England, i.e., during the first two centuries of the English criminal trial jury. To compile a working definition of felony, the paper presents examples of the language of felony drawn from literary and religious sources, in addition to considering the word’s more formulaic appearance in legal records. The paper then analyzes cases ending in acquittal or pardon, highlighting the factors that might take a criminal case (...)
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  6.  6
    Reclaiming a New World: Fen Drainage, Improvement, and Projectors in Seventeenth-Century England.Eric H. Ash - 2016 - Early Science and Medicine 21 (5):445-469.
    The draining of the English Fens was one of the largest and most expensive agricultural improvement projects undertaken in early-modern England. Though the principal motivation was to make money from the improved land, many advocates of fen drainage emphasized the moral, utopian dimension of such projects, part of a much broader program for improvement and reform of all kinds to benefit the English Commonwealth. To those interested in pursuing good husbandry and agricultural improvement for their own sake, the Fens (...)
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  7.  33
    Researching Resistance: Campaigns Against Academies in England.Richard Hatcher & Ken Jones - 2006 - British Journal of Educational Studies 54 (3):329-351.
    This article uses social movement theory to analyse campaigns against a new type of government-sponsored school - the Academy - in four areas of England. It seeks to identify the social composition of anti-Academy campaigns, to track their encounters with proponents of the new schools and to describe the characteristic forms of their campaigning strategies. In doing so, the article aims to help place research into educational opposition and contestation closer to the centre of researchers' agendas.
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  8.  44
    The Light of Freedom in the Age of Enlightenment : England and France.Aleksandar Molnar - 2011 - Filozofija I Društvo 22 (2):129-155.
    Although the philosophy of Enlightenment was born in the Netherlands and England in the late 17th and early 18th century, there were considerable problems in defying the freedom. By the mid 18th century, under the influence of „national mercantilism“ , the freedom was perceived in more and more collective terms, giving bith to the political option of national liberalism. That is why in the second half of 18th century this two countries have been progresively loosing importance for the movement (...)
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  9.  25
    Philosophy, Science, and Religion in England, 1640-1700.Richard W. F. Kroll, Richard Ashcraft & Perez Zagorin (eds.) - 1992 - Cambridge University Press.
    This collection of essays looks at the distinctively English intellectual, social and political phenomenon of Latitudinarianism, which emerged during the Civil War and Interregnum and came into its own after the Restoration, becoming a virtual orthodoxy after 1688. Dividing into two parts, it first examines the importance of the Cambridge Platonists, who sought to embrace the newest philosophical and scientific movements within Church of England orthodoxy, and then moves into the later seventeenth century, from the Restoration onwards, culminating in (...)
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  10.  21
    Gender and Religious Faith Experiences of Adult Christian Exemplars.Malcolm Reid & Paul Kennedy - 2009 - Archive for the Psychology of Religion 31 (1):91-114.
    Open-ended survey responses from 205 Christian exemplars drawn from 37 distinct congregations within 19 Christian denominations in the Northwest and New England regions of the United States were analyzed by chi-square and multiple regression analyses to determine relationships between religious experience and gender. Results indicated that men were more likely than women to describe positions of leadership/responsibility/service as influential to their faith, and to indicate their own personal sin as a faith challenge. Women were more likely than men (...)
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  11. Arthur S. Eddington, The Nature of the Physical World, An Annotated Edition.H. G. Callaway - 2014 - Cambridge Scholars Press.
    Arthur S. Eddington, FRS, (1882–1944) was one of the most prominent British scientists of his time. He made major contributions to astrophysics and to the broader understanding of the revolutionary theories of relativity and quantum mechanics. He is famed for his astronomical observations of 1919, confirming Einstein’s prediction of the curving of the paths of starlight, and he was the first major interpreter of Einstein’s physics to the English-speaking world. His 1928 book, The Nature of the Physical World, here re-issued (...)
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  12.  22
    A Journey Into the Transcendentalists' New England.R. Todd Felton - 2006 - Roaring Forties Press.
    The New England towns and villages that inspired the major figures of the Transcendentalism movement are presented by region in this travel guide that devotes a chapter to each town or village famous for its relationship to one or more of the Transcendentalists. Cambridge, where Ralph Waldo Emerson delivered his powerful speeches is highlighted, as is Walden, where Henry David Thoreau spent two years attuning himself to the rhythms of nature. Other chapters retrace the paths of major writers and (...)
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  13.  37
    Richard Kroll, Richard Ashcraft and Perez Zagorin (eds.), Philosophy, Science and Religion in England, 1640-1700 (Cambridge-New York-Port Chester : Cambridge Univ. Press, 1992). [REVIEW]Francoise Monnoyeur - 1993 - Revue D Histoire des Sciences 47 (1):149-150.
  14.  26
    He Formation of Liberal Education in England and Scotland.Heinz Rhyn - 1999 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 18 (1):5-14.
    The concept of the artes liberales originates in antiquity and was, especially in the Anglo-Saxon area and during the 17th and 18th centuries, remodelled into a socially, educationally, and politically modern educational concept. In this process, the progress within the empirical sciences and the formation of an early civil public are of the utmost importance. In the course of these transformations, the absolute force of church and state is called into question; educational concepts which have to be called modern emerge (...)
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  15.  11
    Re-Thinking Atonement in Jonathan Edwards and New England Theology.S. Mark Hamilton - 2017 - Perichoresis 15 (1):85-99.
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  16. New England Transcendentalism and St. Louis Hegelianism.Henry A. Pochmann - 1948 - New York: Haskell House.
  17.  9
    Land and Power From Roman Britain to Anglo-Saxon England?John Moreland - 2011 - Historical Materialism 19 (1):175-193.
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  18. Transcendentalism in New England.Octavius Brooks Frothingham - 1959 - Gloucester, Mass., P. Smith.
  19. Emerson: A Statement of New England Transcendentalism as Expressed in the Philosophy of its Chief Exponent.Henry David Gray - 1917 - Norwood Editions.
  20. French Philosophers and New-England Transcendentalism.Walter Leatherbee Leighton - 1908 - New York: Greenwood Press.
  21.  5
    Plant and Soil Chemistry in Seventeenth-Century England: Worsley, Boyle and Coxe.Antonio Clericuzio - 2018 - Early Science and Medicine 23 (5-6):550-583.
    In seventeenth-century England agriculturalists, projectors and natural philosophers devoted special attention to the chemical investigation of plants, of soil composition and of fertilizers. Hugh Plat’s and Francis Bacon’s works became particularly influential in the mid-seventeenth century, and inspired much of the Hartlib Circle’s schemes and research for improving agriculture. The Hartlibians turned to chemistry in order to provide techniques for improving soil and to investigate plant generation and growth. They drew upon the Paracelsian chemistry of salts, as well as (...)
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  22.  23
    The Development of an Animal Welfare Impact Assessment Tool and Its Application to Bovine Tuberculosis and Badger Control in England.Steven P. McCulloch & Michael J. Reiss - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (4):485-510.
    Bovine tuberculosis is a controversial animal health policy issue in England, which impacts farmers, the public, cattle and badgers. Badgers act as a wildlife reservoir of disease. Policy options for badger control include do nothing, badger culling, and badger vaccination. This paper argues for mandatory Animal Welfare Impact Assessment for all policy that significantly affects sentient animals. AWIA includes species description, and AWIA analysis stages. In this paper, AWIA is applied to impacts of bovine TB policy options on cattle (...)
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  23.  8
    Bovine Tuberculosis and Badger Culling in England: A Utilitarian Analysis of Policy Options.Steven P. McCulloch & Michael J. Reiss - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (4):511-533.
    Bovine tuberculosis is an important animal health policy issue in Britain, which impacts farmers, the public, domestic farmed cattle and the wild badger population. The Westminster government’s badger culling policy in England, which began in 2013, has caused considerable controversy. This is in part because the Independent Scientific Group advised against culling, based on the Randomised Badger Culling Trial. Those opposed to badger culling support more stringent cattle-based measures and the vaccination of badgers. This paper argues for ethical analysis (...)
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  24.  12
    Hume's Politics: Coordination and Crisis in the History of England.Andrew Sabl - 2012 - Princeton University Press.
    Hume's Politics provides a comprehensive examination of David Hume's political theory, and is the first book to focus on Hume's monumental History of England as the key to his distinctly political ideas.
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  25.  5
    Variation in University Research Ethics Review: Reflections Following an Inter-University Study in England.Claudia Vadeboncoeur, Nick Townsend, Charlie Foster & Mark Sheehan - 2016 - Research Ethics 12 (4):217-233.
    Conducting large multi-site research within universities highlights inconsistencies between universities in approaches, requirements and responses of research ethics committees. Within the context of a social science research study, we attempted to obtain ethical approval from 101 universities across England to recruit students for a short online survey. We received varied responses from research ethics committees of different universities with the steps to obtaining ethics approval ranging from those that only required proof of approval from our home institution, to universities (...)
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  26.  18
    Curriculum Knowledge, Justice, Relations: The Schools White Paper (2010) in England.Christine Winter - 2014 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 48 (2):276-292.
    In this article I begin by discussing the persistent problem of relations between educational inequality and the attainment gap in schools. Because benefits accruing from an education are substantial, the ‘gap’ leads to large disparities in the quality of life many young people can expect to experience in the future. Curriculum knowledge has been a focus for debate in England in relation to educational equality for over 40 years. Given the contestation surrounding views about curriculum knowledge and equality I (...)
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  27.  14
    The ‘Opt-Out’ Approach to Deceased Organ Donation in England: A Misconceived Policy Which May Precipitate Moral Harm.Tobias K. Cantrell - 2019 - Clinical Ethics 14 (2):63-69.
    In an effort to solve the shortage of transplantable organs, there have been several proposals to introduce an opt-out approach to deceased organ donation in England. In seeking to enact the so-called ‘opt-out proposal’ via an amendment to the Human Tissue Act 2004, The Organ Donation Bill 2017–19 represents the most recent attempt at such legal reform. Despite popular calls to the contrary, I argue in this paper that it would be premature for England, or, indeed, any country, (...)
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  28.  3
    Bovine Tuberculosis and Badger Culling in England: An Animal Rights-Based Analysis of Policy Options.Steven P. McCulloch & Michael J. Reiss - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (4):535-550.
    Bovine tuberculosis is an important and controversial animal health policy issue in England, which impacts humans, cattle and badgers. The government policy of badger culling has led to widespread opposition, in part due to the conclusions of a large field trial recommending against culling, and in part because badgers are a cherished wildlife species. Animal rights theorists argue that sentient nonhumans should be accorded fundamental rights against killing and suffering. In bovine TB policy, however, pro-culling actors claim that badgers (...)
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  29. The Locals Love to Jig: A Baggee's Guide to New England Climbing.Mark Colyvan - unknown
    The recent publication of a couple of guidebooks to some of the many crags around Armidale (in the New England area of northern New South Wales) has resulted in a bit of interest from outof-towners. (So far guides have been published on Dome Wall and Moonbi, arguably the best two crags in the district.) This article aims to give a bit of inside information on some of the climbs and, hopefully, entice some new blood (and splintered bone) to the (...)
     
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  30.  10
    Bad, Mad or Sad? Legal Language, Narratives, and Identity Constructions of Women Who Kill Their Children in England and Wales.Siobhan Weare - 2017 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 30 (2):201-222.
    In this article I explore the ways in which legal language, discourses, and narratives construct new dominant identities for women who kill their children. These identities are those of the ‘bad’, ‘mad’, or ‘sad’ woman. Drawing upon and critiquing statutes, case law, and sentencing remarks from England and Wales, I explore how singular narrative identities emerge for the female defendants concerned. Using examples from selected cases, I highlight how the judiciary interpret legislation, use evidence, and draw upon gender stereotypes (...)
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  31.  32
    'Equal Though Different': Laboratories, Museums and the Institutional Development of Biology in Late-Victorian Northern England.Alison Kraft & Samuel J. M. M. Alberti - 2003 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 34 (2):203-236.
    Traditional accounts of the emergence of professional biology have privileged not only metropolis over province, but research over teaching and laboratory over museum. This paper seeks to supplement earlier studies of the ‘transformation of biology’ in the late nineteenth century by exploring in detail the developments within three biology departments in Northern English civic colleges. By outlining changes in the teaching practices, research topics and the accommodation of the departments, the authors demonstrate both locally contingent factors in their development and (...)
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  32.  25
    The Condition of the Working-Class in England in 1844.Friedrich Engels - 2010 [1844] - Cambridge University Press.
    Frederich Engels (1820-1895) was a German businessman and political theorist renowned as one of the intellectual founders of communism. In 1842 Engels was sent to Manchester to oversee his father's textile business, and he lived in the city until 1844. This volume, first published in German in 1845, contains his classic and highly influential account of working-class life in Manchester at the height of its industrial supremacy. Engels' highly detailed descriptions of urban conditions and contrasts between the different classes in (...)
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  33. Emergent Pedagogy in England: A Critical Realist Study of Structure-Agency Interactions in Higher Education.Bushra Sharar - 2016 - Routledge.
    This book aims to show how a meta-theory of critical realism can be applied to research about pedagogy in the changing landscape of higher education in England. It introduces some of the key ideas of critical realism, and its potential to clarify complex issues that arise in research. This book draws on a critical realist study of structure/agency interactions in three contrasting higher education institutions. Seven case studies of lecturers, over the three universities, are considered to explore the interplay (...)
     
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  34.  13
    Civic Republican Social Justice and the Case of State Grammar Schools in England.Andrew Peterson - 2018 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 37 (2):167-179.
    The aim of this paper is to consider the ways in which civic republican theory can provide a meaningful and useful account of social justice, one that is which holds resonance for educational debates. Recognising the need for educationalists interested in civic republicanism to pay greater attention to ideas of justice—and in particular social justice as it concerns relationships between citizens —it is argued that a form of civic republicanism committed to freedom as non-domination is capable of providing a substantive (...)
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  35.  11
    The Development of the Academies Programme: ‘Privatising’ School-Based Education in England 1986–2013.Anne West & Elizabeth Bailey - 2013 - British Journal of Educational Studies 61 (2):137-159.
    ABSTRACT The secondary school system in England has undergone a radical transformation since 2010 with the rapid expansion of independent academies run by private companies (?academy trusts?) and funded directly by central government. This paper examines the development of academies and their predecessors, city technology colleges, and explores the extent and nature of continuity and change. It is argued that processes of layering and policy revision, together with austerity measures arising from economic recession, have resulted in a system-wide change (...)
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  36.  45
    August in England.Keith Tester - 2012 - Thesis Eleven 109 (1):4-10.
    In early August 2011, disturbances broke out in a number of English cities. What happened was broadcast globally, and all of a sudden it seemed as if all of the country was about to burst into flames. This short paper is offered by way of a ‘letter’ from England. It was written in late August 2011 and is an initial attempt to develop an understanding of why the disturbances broke out, what motivated the people who were involved and, indeed, (...)
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  37.  28
    The Reception of the Theodicy in England.Lloyd Strickland - 2016 - In Wenchao Li (ed.), Leibniz, Caroline und die Folgen der englischen Sukzession. Stuttgart: Franz Steiner Verlag. pp. 69-91.
    Leibniz wished that his Theodicy (1710) would have as great and as wide an impact as possible, and to further this end we find him in his correspondence with Caroline often expressing his desire that the book be translated into English. Despite his wishes, and Caroline’s efforts, this was not to happen in his lifetime (indeed, it did not happen until 1951, almost 250 years after Leibniz’s death). But even though the Theodicy did not make quite the impact in (...) that Leibniz had hoped it would, it did draw some attention from the English intelligentsia. In this paper I shall focus on two responses to the Theodicy that were made in England in the years immediately following its publication. First, I shall consider the response of Michel de la Roche and his efforts to promote the book to an English audience in 1711 (efforts which only came to Leibniz’s attention much later, in 1713). De la Roche’s response was broadly positive, though his admiration for the Theodicy was tempered by his belief that Leibniz had struggled – unsuccessfully – to reconcile free will with divine foreknowledge. Second, I shall consider the largely negative response of George Smalridge, the Bishop of Bristol, who delivered his verdict on the book in a letter to Sophie written in 1714. Leibniz subsequently wrote a point-by-point rebuttal of (most of) Smalridge’s criticisms in a letter to Caroline, conceding only one very minor point to the Bishop. As we shall see, some of the points of substance raised by de la Roche and Smalridge have loomed over the Theodicy ever since. (shrink)
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  38.  7
    The Education Welfare Service: The Case for a Review in England.Ken Reid - 2008 - Educational Studies 34 (3):175-189.
    The only major review of the education welfare service took place in 1973 when the role and responsibilities of the service were very different from those of today. Recent legislative changes, the influence of the Children Act 2004 and revised public needs of the service, including new multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary frameworks, suggest that an up‐to‐date review would be timely. It may also help to professionalise the service in a number of different ways, something which is long overdue. This paper provides (...)
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  39.  71
    A Dialogue Between a Philosopher and a Student, of the Common Laws of England.Thomas Hobbes - 1971 - Oxford University Press.
    This volume in the Clarendon Edition of the Works of Thomas Hobbes contains A dialogue between a philosopher and a student, of the common laws of England, edited by Alan Cromartie, supplemented by the important fragment "Questions relative to Hereditary Right," discovered and edited by Quentin Skinner. As a critique of common law by a great philosopher, the Dialogue should be essential reading for anybody interested in English political thought or legal theory. Cromartie has established when and why the (...)
  40. War Zone Rhetoric, Photography and the 2011 Riots in England.Panizza Allmark - 2012 - Environment, Space, Place 4 (1):120-134.
    In the August riots in England 2011, web sites provided up-to-date access to bare witness to the unsettling events that conveyed the essence of contemporary war and crisis reporting. These characteristics include events happening in real time, dramatic accounts, continuous coverage and multimedia footage, with also the inclusion of eyewitness stories and images. The rhetoric of war was used and dramatic photographs played a pivotal role in conveying the civil unrest as a ‘war zone.’ Significantly, the local environment becomes (...)
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  41.  26
    Governmental Professionalism: Re-Professionalising or de-Professionalising Teachers in England?John Beck - 2008 - British Journal of Educational Studies 56 (2):119-143.
    This paper draws on recent work by John Clarke and Janet Newman and their colleagues to analyse a relatively coherent governmental project, spanning the decades of Conservative and New Labour government in England since 1979, that has sought to render teachers increasingly subservient to the state and agencies of the state. Under New Labour this has involved discourse and policies aimed at transforming teaching into a 'modernised profession'. It is suggested that this appropriation of both the concept and substance (...)
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  42. Die Philosophie des 17. Jahrhunderts. Volume 3: England by Jean-Pierre Schobinger. [REVIEW]Gary Hatfield - 1992 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 83 (1):126-128.
    Review of: Jean-Pierre Schobinger (Editor). Die Philosophie des 17. Jahrhunderts. Volume 3: England. 2 half-volumes. xxxiv + 874 pp., bibls., index. Basel: Schwabe, 1988. SFr 160, DM 195.
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  43.  84
    Capacity and Consent in England and Wales: The Mental Capacity Act Under Scrutiny.Peter Herissone-Kelly - 2010 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (3):344-352.
    The Mental Capacity Act 2005 came into force in England and Wales in 2007. Its primary purpose is to provide “a statutory framework to empower and protect people who may lack capacity to make some decisions for themselves.” Examples of such people are those with dementia, learning disabilities, mental health problems, and so on. The Act also gives those who currently have capacity a legal framework within which they can make arrangements for a time when they may come to (...)
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  44.  19
    'Equal Though Different': Laboratories, Museums and the Institutional Development of Biology in Late-Victorian Northern England.A. Kraft & M. M. - 2003 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 34 (2):203-236.
    Traditional accounts of the emergence of professional biology have privileged not only metropolis over province, but research over teaching and laboratory over museum. This paper seeks to supplement earlier studies of the 'transformation of biology' in the late nineteenth century by exploring in detail the developments within three biology departments in Northern English civic colleges. By outlining changes in the teaching practices, research topics and the accommodation of the departments, the authors demonstrate both locally contingent factors in their development and (...)
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  45.  9
    From Domus to Polis: Hybrid Identities in Southey’s Letters From England and Blanco White’s Letters From Spain.Benjamin Colbert - 2019 - The European Legacy 24 (3-4):301-314.
    ABSTRACTRobert Southey’s fictive travelogue, Letters from England, by Don Manuel Alvarez Espriella, inspired several imitators, most importantly José María Blanco White with his Letters from Spain. These works rejuvenate a fictional device popularised by Montesquieu’s Persian Letters—the “familiar stranger”—at a crucial juncture when British involvement in the affairs of Europe provoked a reassessment of pre-Revolutionary cosmopolitanism. The stranger as home-interpreter calls attention to an emerging emphasis in European Romantic thought on the contingency of freedom with hybrid, mobile identities, prefiguring (...)
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  46.  34
    Searching for the Soul of English Universities: An Exploration and Analysis of Christian Higher Education in England.Perry L. Glanzer - 2008 - British Journal of Educational Studies 56 (2):163-183.
    Although church-related universities in England gradually became more secular throughout the twentieth century, a group of nine teacher education colleges with church foundations have recently developed into full fledged universities. This article draws upon documentary and site-based research to evaluate the relevance of the Christian identity for these institutions in light of recent scholarship on the subject.
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  47.  14
    Mathematical Practitioners and Instruments in Elizabethan England.Stephen Johnston - 1991 - Annals of Science 48 (4):319-344.
    Summary A new culture of mathematics was developed in sixteenth-century England, the culture of ?the mathematicalls?. Its representatives were the self-styled mathematical practitioners who presented their art as a practical and worldly activity. The careers of two practitioners, Thomas Bedwell and Thomas Hood, are used as case studies to examine the establishment of this culture of the mathematicalls. Both practitioners self-consciously used mathematical instruments as key resources in negotiating their own roles. Bedwell defined his role in contrast to mechanicians (...)
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  48.  45
    Curiosity, Forbidden Knowledge, and the Reformation of Natural Philosophy in Early Modern England.Peter Harrison - 2001 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 92:265-290.
    [Introduction]: Curiosity is now widely regarded, with some justification, as a vital ingredient of the inquiring mind and, more particularly, as a crucial virtue for the practitioner of the pure sciences. We have become accustomed to associate curiosity with innocence and, in its more mature manifestations, with the pursuit of truth for its own sake. It was not always so. The sentiments expressed in Sir John Davies's poem, published on the eve of the seventeenth century, paint a somewhat different picture. (...)
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  49.  12
    Classification and Framing of the Curriculum in Evangelical Christian and Muslim Schools in England and The Netherlands.Geoffrey Walford - 2002 - Educational Studies 28 (4):403-419.
    This article examines some of the ways that Muslim and evangelical Christian schools in England and The Netherlands deal with religious education. Various schools take different views about how aspects of religious belief should be taught and how Christian or Muslim belief should be related to the wider curriculum of the school. While some of the schools have attempted to integrate, for example, evangelical Christianity throughout the whole of the curriculum, others have been content to have the religious teaching (...)
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  50.  53
    Locke’s Reputation in Nineteenth-Century England.Hans Aarsleff - 1971 - The Monist 55 (3):392-422.
    In 1890 C. S. Peirce wrote a review of A. C. Fraser’s recent book on Locke, published to coincide with the bicentennial of Locke’s Essay. Peirce remarked that “Locke’s grand work was substantially this: Men must think for themselves, and genuine thought is an act of perception…. We cannot fail to acknowledge a superior element of truth in the practicality of Locke’s thought, which on the whole should place him nearly upon a level with Descartes.” This estimate of Locke was (...)
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