Results for 'Nose, Jeri'

131 found
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  1.  16
    How to Be Rational About Empirical Success in Ongoing Science: The Case of the Quantum Nose and its Critics.Ann-Sophie Barwich - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 69:40-51.
    Empirical success is a central criterion for scientific decision-making. Yet its understanding in philosophical studies of science deserves renewed attention: Should philosophers think differently about the advancement of science when they deal with the uncertainty of outcome in ongoing research in comparison with historical episodes? This paper argues that normative appeals to empirical success in the evaluation of competing scientific explanations can result in unreliable conclusions, especially when we are looking at the changeability of direction in ongoing investigations. The challenges (...)
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  2. Aristotle's 'Cosmic Nose' Argument for the Uniqueness of the World.Tim O'Keefe & Harald Thorsrud - 2003 - Apeiron 36 (4):311 - 326.
    David Furley's work on the cosmologies of classical antiquity is structured around what he calls "two pictures of the world." The first picture, defended by both Plato and Aristotle, portrays the universe, or all that there is (to pan), as identical with our particular ordered world-system. Thus, the adherents of this view claim that the universe is finite and unique. The second system, defended by Leucippus and Democritus, portrays an infinite universe within which our particular kosmos is only one of (...)
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  3.  5
    Wittgenstein's Nose.Avrum Stroll - 1989 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 33 (1):395-413.
    J.J. Gibson claims that one who is looking at Niagara Falls is seeing it directly, whereas one who is looking at a picture of Niagara Falls is seeing it indirectly or mediately. Gibson's cognitivist critics claim that all perception is mediated and that "external objects" are never seen directly. Each side takes the debate to be a scientific issue. But following Wittgenstein's "nose" for detecting philosophical intrusions into what do not appear to be philosophical debates, the author shows how such (...)
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  4.  24
    History and the Brewmaster's Nose.Raymond Martin - 1985 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 15 (2):253 - 272.
    A good historian often can assess the relative likelihood of competing historical claims more reliably on implicit grounds - intuitively, if you like - than in any other available way. This idea has been a persistent theme of Verstehen-theorists. It is, in essence, the old saw that there is no substitute for the brewmaster's nose, adapted to the art of producing historical brew. If true, it augments the importance of the historian relative to that of his arguments, and thereby gives (...)
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  5.  16
    Wittgenstein's Nose.Avrum Stroll - 1989 - In Brian McGuinness & Rudolf Haller (eds.), Grazer Philosophische Studien. Rodopi. pp. 395-413.
    J.J. Gibson claims that one who is looking at Niagara Falls is seeing it directly, whereas one who is looking at a picture of Niagara Falls is seeing it indirectly or mediately. Gibson's cognitivist critics claim that all perception is mediated and that "external objects" are never seen directly. Each side takes the debate to be a scientific issue. But following Wittgenstein's "nose" for detecting philosophical intrusions into what do not appear to be philosophical debates, the author shows how such (...)
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  6.  3
    Wittgenstein's Nose.Avrum Stroll - 1989 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 33 (1):395-413.
    J.J. Gibson claims that one who is looking at Niagara Falls is seeing it directly, whereas one who is looking at a picture of Niagara Falls is seeing it indirectly or mediately. Gibson's cognitivist critics claim that all perception is mediated and that "external objects" are never seen directly. Each side takes the debate to be a scientific issue. But following Wittgenstein's "nose" for detecting philosophical intrusions into what do not appear to be philosophical debates, the author shows how such (...)
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  7. What the Nose Doesn't Know: Non-Veridicality and Olfactory Experience.Clare Batty - 2010 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 17 (3-4):10-17.
    We can learn much about perceptual experience by thinking about how it can mislead us. In this paper, I explore whether, and how, olfactory experience can mislead. I argue that, in the case of olfactory experience, the traditional distinction between illusion and hallucination does not apply. Integral to the traditional distinction is a notion of ‘object-failure’—the failure of an experience to present objects accurately. I argue that there are no such presented objects in olfactory experience. As a result, olfactory experience (...)
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  8. Up the Nose of the Beholder? Aesthetic Perception in Olfaction as a Decision-Making Process.Ann-Sophie Barwich - 2017 - New Ideas in Psychology 47:157-165.
    Is the sense of smell a source of aesthetic perception? Traditional philosophical aesthetics has centered on vision and audition but eliminated smell for its subjective and inherently affective character. This article dismantles the myth that olfaction is an unsophisticated sense. It makes a case for olfactory aesthetics by integrating recent insights in neuroscience with traditional expertise about flavor and fragrance assessment in perfumery and wine tasting. My analysis concerns the importance of observational refinement in aesthetic experience. I argue that the (...)
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  9.  68
    On What Is in Front of Your Nose.Anton Ford - 2016 - Philosophical Topics 44 (1):141-161.
    The conclusion of practical reasoning is commonly said to rest upon a diverse pair of representations—a “major” and a “minor” premise—the first of which concerns the end and the second, the means. Modern and contemporary philosophers writing on action and practical reasoning tend to portray the minor premise as a “means-end belief”—a belief about, as Michael Smith puts it, “the ways in which one thing leads to another,” or, as John McDowell puts it, “what can be relied on to bring (...)
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  10. The Influence of Anxiety and Literature's Panglossian Nose.Michael Austin - 2007 - Philosophy and Literature 31 (2):215-232.
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  11. A Nose by Any Other Name: Sameness, Substitution, and Essence in Aristotle's Metaphysics Z5.Frank A. Lewis - 2005 - In David Sedley (ed.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy Xxviii: Summer 2005. Oxford University Press.
  12. A Nose by Any Other Name: Sameness, Substitution, and Essence in Metaphysics Z 5.Frank A. Lewis - 2005 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 28:161-91.
  13.  18
    Following One's Nose in Reading W. G. Sebald Allegorically: Currere and Invisible Subjects.Teresa Strong‐Wilson - 2017 - Educational Theory 67 (2):153-171.
    In education, we are concerned with the teaching and learning of subjects, but the word “subject” can refer to the discipline being studied as well as the individual who is studying. In this essay, Teresa Strong-Wilson explores this “double entendre” of curriculum studies through the analogy afforded by German author-in-exile W. G. Sebald's working through of difficult subjects by way of semi-autobiographical writing that takes the form of an “invisible subject”: a preoccupation with an unnamed injustice entangled with his own (...)
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  14.  15
    Fissured Skin, Inner Ear Radio, and a Telepathic Nose: The Senses as Media in Salman Rushdie's Midnight's Children.Ankhi Mukherjee - 2006 - Paragraph 29 (3):55-76.
    This essay brings the postcolonial novel in relation with an often-overlooked but rich resource: the embedded, materialist figurations of psychoanalysis. It examines Salman Rushdie's use of the alternative register of sensory perception in Midnight's Children to piece together an extant self that corresponds both actively and passively to the new historical and political realities of the subcontinent. In doing so, however, the essay moves beyond critical commonplaces about Rushdie's magical realism and revisionary historiography to align his æsthetic instead to the (...)
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  15.  11
    Michelangelo's Nose: A Myth and Its MakerWhy Mona Lisa Smiles and Other Tales by Vasari.David Carrier & Paul Barolsky - 1992 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 50 (3):249.
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  16.  20
    What Use Is Literature to Political Philosophy?: Or The Funny Thing About Socrates's Nose.David Robjant - 2015 - Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):322-337.
    Like Leo Strauss and Karl Popper, most readers take it that one cannot have a political reading of the Republic at all, except by interest in Plato’s attitude toward the proposals developed by Socrates and his interlocutors. But this is not true. I do not mean that it is a good idea to cultivate apathy concerning Plato’s attitudes to sexual equality, private property, food, war, and so on. I mean that there is this possibility mentioned by Stanley Rosen, that “Plato (...)
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  17.  7
    A Political Literacy:" The Emperor" s New Clothes' Rudolph's Red Nose, Gertrude's" A Rose is a Rose is a Rose" and Rap.Glorianne M. Leck - 1991 - Educational Studies 22 (1):1-14.
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  18.  3
    Speed in Your Nose: The Effect of a Nebulized Essential Oil on Reaction Time and Brain Function.Mark Dwyer, Stephen Provost & Mitchell Longstaff - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  19.  7
    Ear, Nose, and Throat Surgical Access for Remote Living Indigenous Children: What is the Least Costly Model?Susan P. Jacups, Irina Kinchin & Kate M. McConnon - 2018 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 24 (6):1330-1338.
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  20.  14
    The Camel's Nose: Memoirs of a Curious Scientist. Knut Schmidt-Nielsen.Manfred D. Laubichler - 1999 - Isis 90 (3):622-624.
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  21.  17
    Acquisition of a Nose-Poke Response in Rats as an Operant.Charles W. Schindler, Eric B. Thorndike & Steven R. Goldberg - 1993 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 31 (4):291-294.
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  22.  22
    On Moral Nose.Arthur M. Wheeler - 1977 - Philosophical Quarterly 27 (108):249-253.
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  23.  14
    A Semiotic Perspective in China From a "Big-Nose".Richard L. Lanigan - 1996 - In John Deely & C. W. Spinks (eds.), Semiotics 1996. New York: Peter Lang Publishers. pp. 249-255.
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  24.  8
    Lucilius and His Nose.J. D. Morgan - 1992 - Classical Quarterly 42 (1):279-282.
    In his prefatory epistle dedicating his Naturalis Historia to Vespasian, the elder Pliny takes great pains to plead that his magnum opus is unworthy of the emperor: ‘maiorem te sciebam, quam ut descensurum hue putarem’. Continuing in this vein, Pliny goes on to say ‘praeterea est quaedam publica etiam eruditorum reiectio’, and appeals for support to the great Cicero: ‘utitur ilia et M. Tullius extra omnem ingenii aleam positus, et, quod miremur, per aduocatum defenditur’. Cicero's aduocatus is the satirist Lucilius, (...)
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  25.  10
    The Camel's Nose: Memoirs of a Curious Scientist by Knut Schmidt-Nielsen. [REVIEW]Manfred Laubichler - 1999 - Isis 90:622-624.
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  26.  12
    Antiaesthetics: An Appreciation of the Cow with the Subtile Nose.Peter Lewis - 1986 - Philosophical Books 27 (1):63-64.
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  27.  17
    By a Nose: On the Construction of 'Foreign Bodies'.Sander L. Gilman - 1999 - Social Epistemology 13 (1):49 – 58.
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  28.  4
    The Nose and Altered States of Consciousness: Tascodrugites and Ezekiel.John J. Pilch - 2002 - Hts Theological Studies 58 (2).
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  29.  7
    The Courage of Strangers: Coming of Age with the Human Rights Movement, Jeri Laber , 416 Pp., $27.50 Cloth. [REVIEW]David Petrasek - 2002 - Ethics and International Affairs 16 (2):164-166.
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  30.  5
    Lucilius and His Nose (Pliny, N.H., Praef. 7).J. D. Morgan - 1992 - Classical Quarterly 42 (01):279-.
    In his prefatory epistle dedicating his Naturalis Historia to Vespasian, the elder Pliny takes great pains to plead that his magnum opus is unworthy of the emperor: ‘maiorem te sciebam, quam ut descensurum hue putarem’ . Continuing in this vein, Pliny goes on to say ‘praeterea est quaedam publica etiam eruditorum reiectio’, and appeals for support to the great Cicero: ‘utitur ilia et M. Tullius extra omnem ingenii aleam positus, et, quod miremur, per aduocatum defenditur’ . Cicero's aduocatus is the (...)
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  31.  3
    Proust's Nose.Sander Gilman - 2000 - Social Research 67.
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  32. Derekh Emunah Baḥarti: Divre Musar Ṿe-Hashḳafah Be-Nośe Ha-Emunah Meluḳaṭim Mi-Sifre Gedole Ha-Dorot, Rishonim Ṿe-Aḥaronim: ʻuvdot Ṿe-Sipurim Mi-Gedole Ha-Dorot ..Shimʻon Ṿanunu - 2003 - Mekhon Barukh.
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  33. The Knowledge of Divine Things From Revelation, Not From Reason or Nature, by a Gentleman of Brazen Nose College.John Ellis - 1743
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  34. The Knowledge of Divine Things From Revelation, Not From Reason or Nature, by a Gentleman of Brazen Nose College. To Which is Added the Continuation, an Enquiry, Whence Cometh Wisdom and Understanding to Man?John Ellis - 1811
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  35. Nedive ʻamim: Ḳovets Maʼamarim Be-Nośe Midot Ṿe-Emunah le-Zikhro Shel Segen Nisim Ben Daṿid H.Y.D.Ilan Elmaliaḥ (ed.) - 2008 - Ha-Ḳeren le-Hantsaḥat Ha-Ḳatsin Nisim Ben Daṿid.
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  36. Fabula-Mundi History of Philosophy and Cleopatra Nose.L. Kolakowski - 1975 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 29 (111):113-120.
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  37. Proust's Nose.L. Gilman Sander - 2000 - Social Research 67 (1).
     
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  38. Antiaesthetics an Appreciation of the Cow with the Subtile Nose.Paul Ziff - 1984
     
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  39.  19
    La pin-up US, un exemple d’érotisme patriotique.Camille Favre - 2012 - Clio 35:239-264.
    L’érotisme très particulier de la pin-up, celui de la « fille d’à côté », fait de cette figure une icône américaine des années 40 dans l’imaginaire collectif. L’engouement populaire qu’elle suscite, dans ces années là, est réel, notamment aux États-Unis. Pourtant autour de cette simple image de légèreté et d’insouciance, de nombreux enjeux politiques se nouent. Employée de manière massive durant la Seconde Guerre mondiale pour « remonter le moral des troupes » sur le front et à l’arrière, la pin-up, (...)
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  40. Voluntary Action and Conscious Awareness.Patrick Haggard, Sam Clark & Jeri Kalogeras - 2002 - Nature Neuroscience 5 (4):382-385.
  41. Restricted Composition.Ned Markosian - 2008 - In Theodore Sider, John Hawthorne & Dean W. Zimmerman (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Metaphysics. Blackwell. pp. 341--63.
    Let’s begin with a simple example. Consider two quarks: one near the tip of your nose, the other near the center of Alpha Centauri. Here is a question about these two subatomic particles: Is there an object that has these two quarks as its parts and that has no other parts? According to one view of the matter (a view that is surprisingly endorsed by a great many contemporary philosophers), the answer to this question is Yes. But I think it (...)
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  42. Sniffing and Smelling.Louise Richardson - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 162 (2):401-419.
    In this paper I argue that olfactory experience, like visual experience, is exteroceptive: it seems to one that odours, when one smells them, are external to the body, as it seems to one that objects are external to the body when one sees them. Where the sense of smell has been discussed by philosophers, it has often been supposed to be non-exteroceptive. The strangeness of this philosophical orthodoxy makes it natural to ask what would lead to its widespread acceptance. I (...)
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  43. Strange Kinds, Familiar Kinds, and the Charge of Arbitrariness.Daniel Z. Korman - 2010 - Oxford Studies in Metaphysics:119-144.
    Particularists in material-object metaphysics hold that our intuitive judgments about which kinds of things there are and are not are largely correct. One common argument against particularism is the argument from arbitrariness, which turns on the claim that there is no ontologically significant difference between certain of the familiar kinds that we intuitively judge to exist (snowballs, islands, statues, solar systems) and certain of the strange kinds that we intuitively judge not to exist (snowdiscalls, incars, gollyswoggles, the fusion of the (...)
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  44.  85
    Sniff, Smell, and Stuff.Vivian Mizrahi - 2014 - Philosophical Studies 171 (2):233-250.
    Most philosophers consider olfactory experiences to be very poor in comparison to other sense modalities. And because olfactory experiences seem to lack the spatial content necessary to object perception, philosophers tend to maintain that smell is purely sensational or abstract. I argue in this paper that the apparent poverty and spatial indeterminateness of odor experiences does not reflect the “subjective” or “abstract” nature of smell, but only that smell is not directed to particular things. According to the view defended in (...)
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  45. The Illusion Confusion.Clare Batty - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5:1-11.
    In "What the Nose Doesn't Know", I argue that there are no olfactory illusions. Central to the traditional notions of illusion and hallucination is a notion of object-failure—the failure of an experience to represent particular objects. Because there are no presented objects in the case of olfactory experience, I argue that the traditional ways of categorizing non-veridical experience do not apply to the olfactory case. In their place, I propose a novel notion of non-veridical experience for the olfactory case. In (...)
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  46.  30
    Context Processing in Older Adults: Evidence for a Theory Relating Cognitive Control to Neurobiology in Healthy Aging.Todd S. Braver, Deanna M. Barch, Beth A. Keys, Cameron S. Carter, Jonathan D. Cohen, Jeffrey A. Kaye, Jeri S. Janowsky, Stephan F. Taylor, Jerome A. Yesavage & Martin S. Mumenthaler - 2001 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 130 (4):746.
  47.  32
    Minding the Metaphor: The Elusive Character of Moral Disgust.Edward Royzman & Robert Kurzban - 2011 - Emotion Review 3 (3):269-271.
    Aiming to circumvent metaphor-prone properties of natural language, Chapman, Kim, Susskind, and Anderson (2009) recently reported evidence for morally induced activation of the levator labii region (manifest as an upper lip raise and a nose wrinkle), also implicated in responding to bad tastes and contaminants. Here we point out that the probative value of this type of evidence rests on a particular (and heavily contested) account of facial movements, one which holds them to be “expressions” or automatic read-outs of internal (...)
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  48.  6
    Lesion Analysis of the Brain Areas Involved in Language Comprehension.Nina F. Dronkers, David P. Wilkins, Robert D. Van Valin, Brenda B. Redfern & Jeri J. Jaeger - 2004 - Cognition 92 (1-2):145-177.
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  49.  27
    Mid-Level Managers, Organizational Context, and (Un)Ethical Encounters.Kathy Lund Dean, Jeri Mullins Beggs & Timothy P. Keane - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 97 (1):51–69.
    This article details day-to-day ethics issues facing MBAs who occupy entry-level and mid-level management positions and offers defined examples of the stressors these managers face. The study includes lower-level managers, essentially excluded from extant literature, and focuses on workplace behaviors both undertaken and observed. Results indicate that pressures from internal organization sources, and ambiguity in letter versus spirit of rules, account for over a third of the most frequent unethical situations encountered, and that most managers did not expect to face (...)
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  50. The Pinocchio Paradox.Peter Eldridge-Smith & Veronique Eldridge-Smith - 2010 - Analysis 70 (2):212-215.
    The Pinocchio paradox, devised by Veronique Eldridge-Smith in February 2001, is a counter-example to solutions to the Liar that restrict the use or definition of semantic predicates. Pinocchio’s nose grows if and only if what he is stating is false, and Pinocchio says ‘My nose is growing’. In this statement, ‘is growing’ has its normal meaning and is not a semantic predicate. If Pinocchio’s nose is growing it is because he is saying something false; otherwise, it is not growing. ‘Because’ (...)
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