Results for 'Not Available Not Available'

999 found
Order:
  1.  11
    Politics and Worldview.Not Available Not Available - 2003 - Philosophy and Geography 6 (1):123-130.
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  4
    [Not Available].Heinz Schott - 1986 - Philosophia Naturalis 24 (1):3-14.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  3.  3
    [Not Available].Sergio Moravia - 1965 - Giornale Critico Della Filosofia Italiana:64-109.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  4.  4
    Not Available.Walter Tega - 1971 - Rivista di Filosofia 62:155.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. AN Appropriate English Lexiconic Equivalent of Sunyata is Not Available Because Each Word Derives its Meaning From its Context. That is Why It is so Difficult to Translate a Word From One Language to Another. Sttnya in English is" Void;" Sunyata Is.Suniti Kumar Pathak - 2005 - In Bettina Baumer & John R. Dupuche (eds.), Void and Fullness in the Buddhist, Hindu, and Christian Traditions: Sunya-Purna-Pleroma. D.K. Printworld.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. (Not for Citations. Published Copy Available on Request.).Neera K. Badhwar - unknown
    1.1 Are commercial societies unfriendly to friendship? Many critics of commercial societies, from both the left and the right, have thought so. They claim that the free-market system of property rights, freedom of contract, and other liberty rights – the “negative” right of individuals to peacefully pursue their own ends – is impersonal and dehumanizing, or even inherently divisive and adversarial. Yet (their complaint goes) the psychology and morality of markets and liberty rights pervade far too many relationships in a (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  16
    Why Not Open the Black Box of Journal Editing in Philosophy? Make Peer Reviews of Published Papers Available.Caroline Schaffalitzky de Muckadell & Esben Nedenskov Petersen - 2017 - Metaphilosophy 48 (3):245-257.
    Despite general agreement within philosophy that peer review is indispensable, its fairness and reliability is often questioned. This article suggests that such worries can to a large extent be met by adopting the practice that reviews as well as earlier versions of papers are made publicly available when the final version of a paper is published. This suggestion combines the advantages of transparency with the merits of anonymity of reviewers. While there are obstacles to this suggestion, the article argues (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  62
    A Priori Knowledge of the World Not Easily Available.Anthony Brueckner - 2001 - Philosophical Studies 104 (1):109-114.
  9. Not Easily Available 109–114.Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen, Are Question–Begging, Amy Kind, Qualia Realism, Patricia Marino, Moral Dilemmas & Moral Progress - 2001 - Philosophical Studies 104:337-338.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  10.  43
    Lehrer/Wagner Consensual Probabilities Do Not Adequately Summarize the Available Information.Davis Baird - 1985 - Synthese 62 (1):47 - 62.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  11.  14
    Pantelidou Αί Προïστορικαὶ Ἀθῆναι. [With Eng. Summary.] Athens: [The Author]. 1975. Pp. 276, 79 Plates, 16 Text Figs. Price Not Stated. [Available Through Wasmuth, Tübingen.]. [REVIEW]W. G. Cavanagh - 1978 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 98:200-200.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Spatial Information Obtained From Simulated Travel is Not Equally Available.Ds Klopfer, Gb Reid & R. Marcelo - 1992 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 30 (6):454-454.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. 24 S. Petrilli Archives (Toronto, Canada), Welby's Publications—Most, If Not All, of Which Are Available at the Lady Welby Library, London University Library (London, England)—Include a Traveler's Diary Written as a Child (1852), Numerous Essays (Cf. Welby 1890a, 1891a, 1892a, 1985b. [REVIEW]S. Peirce - 1999 - Semiotica 127 (1/4):23-66.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  36
    A Model for Partnering with Not-for-Profits to Develop Socially Responsible Businesses in a Global Environment.Kathleen Wilburn - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (S1):111-120.
    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is increasingly important in the global environment. Businesses that want to be socially responsible, but do not have the resources of multinational corporations, can partner with non-governmental (NGO), not-for-profit (NFP), and religious organizations to access information about the culture, customs, and needs of the people in areas where they wish to do business. Without such information, CSR projects can have unintended consequences that are not beneficial for the community. Suggesting that local farmers sell corn to ethanol (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  15.  21
    Reexamining the Expected Effect of Available Resources and Firm Size on Firm Environmental Orientation: An Empirical Study of UK Firms.Khaled Elsayed - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 65 (3):297-308.
    An emergent body of literature examined why some firms apply some environmental initiatives while other firms do not take responsibility for their natural environment? Thus, firm environmental orientation (responsiveness and performance) are linked in the literature to several variables. Unfortunately, the relationship between firm environmental orientation and either available resources or firm size showed mixed results and inconclusive evidence. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to show empirically how available resources and firm size can explain differences in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  16.  16
    Why the Doctor Will NOT See You Now: The Ethics of Enforcing Covenants Not to Compete in Physician Employment Contracts.Michelle Bednarz Beauchamp, Sandra S. Benson & Lara Womack Daniel - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 119 (3):1-18.
    When a physician employment relationship terminates, the physician–patient relationship may also be terminated by enforcement of a covenant not to compete, which typically forces the physician to leave the geographic area for a period of time. This gives rise to several ethical dilemmas. The public interest is compromised when enforcement of these covenants contributes to the shortage of physicians in the community, and individual patients are harmed when their physicians are no longer available. The authors undertook a unique study (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  33
    "If Oswald Had Not Killed Kennedy" – Spohn on Counterfactuals.Hans Rott - 2016 - In Wolfgang Freitag, Hans Rott, Holger Sturm & Alexandra Zinke (eds.), Von Rang und Namen. Philosophical Essays in Honour of Wolfgang Spohn. Münster, Germany: Mentis. pp. 379–399.
    Wolfgang Spohn's theory of ranking functions is an elegant and powerful theory of the structure and dynamics of doxastic states. In two recent papers, Spohn has applied it to the analysis of conditionals, claiming to have presented a unified account of indicative and subjunctive (counterfactual) conditionals. I argue that his analysis fails to account for counterfactuals that refer to indirect causes. The strategy of taking the transitive closure that Spohn employs in the theory of causation is not available for (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Not Guilty By Reason of Genetic Determinism.Mark Philpott - 1996 - In Henry Tam (ed.), Punishment, Excuses and Moral Development. Avebury. pp. 95-112.
    In February 1994, Stephen Mobley was convicted of the murder of John Collins. Mobley's lawyers attempted to introduce genetic evidence in an attempt to have Mobley's sentence reduced from death to life imprisonment. I examine the prospects for appeal to genetic determinism as a criminal defense. Guided by existing standards for insanity defenses, I argue that a genetic defense might be allowable in exceptional cases but will not be generally available as some have worried.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  19.  32
    Autonomy, the Right Not to Know, and the Right to Know Personal Research Results: What Rights Are There, and Who Should Decide About Exceptions?Gert Helgesson - 2014 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 42 (1):28-37.
    This paper defends the right not to know personal health information, while it discards the right of research participants to receive individual research results. Disagreement regarding the right not to know stems from two different conceptions of autonomy, leading to opposing normative conclusions. Researchers occasionally have good reason to inform research participants about incidental findings in spite of the absence of a right to know such information. Such decisions have to be made by health care personnel and researchers on a (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  20.  87
    Why Reciprocal Altruism is Not a Kind of Group Selection.Grant Ramsey & Robert Brandon - 2011 - Biology and Philosophy 26 (3):385-400.
    Reciprocal altruism was originally formulated in terms of individual selection and most theorists continue to view it in this way. However, this interpretation of reciprocal altruism has been challenged by Sober and Wilson (1998). They argue that reciprocal altruism (as well as all other forms of altruism) evolves by the process of group selection. In this paper, we argue that the original interpretation of reciprocal altruism is the correct one. We accomplish this by arguing that if fitness attaches to (at (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  21.  58
    Too Naturalist and Not Naturalist Enough: Reply to Horsten.Luca Incurvati - 2008 - Erkenntnis 69 (2):261 - 274.
    Leon Horsten has recently claimed that the class of mathematical truths coincides with the class of theorems of ZFC. I argue that the naturalistic character of Horsten’s proposal undermines his contention that this claim constitutes an analogue of a thesis that Daniel Isaacson has advanced for PA. I argue, moreover, that Horsten’s defence of his claim against an obvious objection makes use of a distinction which is not available to him given his naturalistic approach. I suggest a way out (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  22.  39
    Should Smallpox Vaccine Be Made Available to the General Public?Thomas May & Ross D. Silverman - 2003 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 13 (2):67-82.
    : In June 2002, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) approved draft recommendations concerning preparation for potential biological terror attacks that utilize the smallpox virus. ACIP recommends against both mandatory and voluntary vaccination of the general public. The present paper examines the moral and political considerations both for and against each of the general public vaccination options considered by the ACIP in the context of the state's authority over vaccination for the purposes of protecting public health. Although it is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  23.  24
    Decision Making Capacity Should Not Be Decisive in Emergencies.Dieneke Hubbeling - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (2):229-238.
    Examples of patients with anorexia nervosa, depression or borderline personality disorder who have decision-making capacity as currently operationalized, but refuse treatment, are discussed. It appears counterintuitive to respect their treatment refusal because their wish seems to be fuelled by their illness and the consequences of their refusal of treatment are severe. Some proposed solutions have focused on broadening the criteria for decision-making capacity, either in general or for specific patient groups, but these adjustments might discriminate against particular groups of patients (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. Wittgenstein Against Interpretation: "the Meaning of a Text Does Not Stop Short of its Facts".Sonia Sedivy - 2004 - In John Gibson Wolfgang Huemer (ed.), The Literary Wittgenstein. Routledge. pp. 165-185.
    This paper argues that a Wittgensteinian understanding of language as an integral dimension of human forms of life speaks against the view that our relationship to texts is interpretive in nature. Wittgenstein’s re-orientation to language entails that meaning is immediate rather than interpretive, and that our works don’t stop short of the facts. The aim of this paper is to show that the immediate mutuality of meanings and facts carries over to our textual practices so that our texts make (...) immediate unities of meanings and narrative facts. Wittgenstein’s reflections on following rules, customs or forms of life allow us to steer a careful course between the view that a text is determined by the author’s intentions and a relativism of variable interpretations that results from denying the relevance of authorial intentions. For example, Stanley Fish holds that meanings vary insofar as they are “predetermined’ by our “presuppositions” – our interests, goals and assumptions. But Wittgenstein’s work suggests that following rules, and hence grasping meanings, does not involve something as variable as individual “presuppositions.” Rather, our training into forms of life opens up a second-nature where grasp of both facts and meanings is immediate. This allows us to re-affirm the view that there are textual facts that do not depend on interpretation; that there is a difference between apprehending the facts of a text and going on to provide further interpretations of those facts. The ‘co-constitution’ of meanings and facts does not foreclose interpretive practices but allocates them to their proper sphere – as practices that we may wish to undertake in order to go beyond the initial immediate openness of the world of a text. We can test this view by considering the way our changing forms of forms affect the way we read a text such as Jane Austen’s Mansfied Park. (shrink)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Why the Empirical Study of Non-Philosophical Expertise Does Not Undermine the Status of Philosophical Expertise.Theodore Bach - forthcoming - Erkenntnis:1-25.
    In some domains experts perform better than novices, and in other domains experts do not generally perform better than novices. According to empirical studies of expert performance, this is because the former but not the latter domains make available to training practitioners a direct form of learning feedback. Several philosophers resource this empirical literature to cast doubt on the quality of philosophical expertise. They claim that philosophy is like the dubious domains in that it does not make available (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  26. Belief is Not the Issue: A Defence of Inference to the Best Explanation.Gregory W. Dawes - 2013 - Ratio 26 (1):62-78.
    Defences of inference to the best explanation (IBE) frequently associate IBE with scientific realism, the idea that it is reasonable to believe our best scientific theories. I argue that this linkage is unfortunate. IBE does not warrant belief, since the fact that a theory is the best available explanation does not show it to be (even probably) true. What IBE does warrant is acceptance: taking a proposition as a premise in theoretical and/or practical reasoning. We ought to accept our (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  27.  8
    Commentary on ‘Moral Reasons to Edit the Human Genome’: This is Not the Moral Imperative We Are Looking For.Sarah Chan - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (8):528-529.
    After reading Savulescu and colleagues,1 one ought to be in no doubt that human heritable genome editing is a ‘moral imperative’: to cure disease, reduce inequalities, improve public health and protect future generations. They make this argument repeatedly and in no uncertain terms. Yet are they right to do so? I am certainly not against developing HGE or exploring its possibilities. Instead, I aim to sound a cautionary note in relation to claims about its technological potential and how we frame (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  28. Medicine is Not Science.Clifford Miller & Donald W. Miller - 2014 - European Journal for Person Centered Healthcare 2 (2):144-153.
    ABSTRACT: Abstract Most modern knowledge is not science. The physical sciences have successfully validated theories to infer they can be used universally to predict in previously unexperienced circumstances. According to the conventional conception of science such inferences are falsified by a single irregular outcome. And verification is by the scientific method which requires strict regularity of outcome and establishes cause and effect. -/- Medicine, medical research and many “soft” sciences are concerned with individual people in complex heterogeneous populations. These populations (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  29. Hindsight Bias is Not a Bias.Brian Hedden - 2019 - Analysis 79 (1):43-52.
    Humans typically display hindsight bias. They are more confident that the evidence available beforehand made some outcome probable when they know the outcome occurred than when they don't. There is broad consensus that hindsight bias is irrational, but this consensus is wrong. Hindsight bias is generally rationally permissible and sometimes rationally required. The fact that a given outcome occurred provides both evidence about what the total evidence available ex ante was, and also evidence about what that evidence supports. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Pragmatic Encroachment: It's Not Just About Knowledge.Jeremy Fantl & Matthew McGrath - 2012 - Episteme 9 (1):27-42.
    There is pragmatic encroachment on some epistemic status just in case whether a proposition has that status for a subject depends not only on the subject's epistemic position with respect to the proposition, but also on features of the subject's non-epistemic, practical environment. Discussions of pragmatic encroachment usually focus on knowledge. Here we argue that, barring infallibilism, there is pragmatic encroachment on what is arguably a more fundamental epistemic status – the status a proposition has when it is warranted enough (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  31. ‘Learning (Not) To’ and Practical Knowledge.Christos Douskos - 2017 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 94 (4):495-523.
    _ Source: _Page Count 29 The author raises objections to the intellectualist analysis of knowing-how on the basis of certain features of ‘learning to’ ascriptions. He starts by observing that ‘learning to’ ascriptions can only have a first-personal reading. Since embedded questions make the generic reading available, this suggests that ‘learning to’ ascriptions are not embedded question configurations. Then the author locates an ambiguity in ‘learning to’ ascriptions. They can be used to ascribe either the acquisition of practical knowledge, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32.  16
    When Choices Are Not Personal: The Effect of Statistical and Social Cues on Children's Inferences About the Scope of Preferences.Gil Diesendruck, Shira Salzer, Tamar Kushnir & Fei Xu - 2015 - Journal of Cognition and Development 16 (2):370-380.
    Individual choices are commonly taken to manifest personal preferences. The present study investigated whether social and statistical cues influence young children's inferences about the generalizability of preferences. Preschoolers were exposed to either 1 or 2 demonstrators’ selections of objects. The selected objects constituted 18%, 50%, or 100% of all available objects. We found that children took a single demonstrator's choices as indicative only of his or her personal preference. However, when 2 demonstrators made the same selection, then children inferred (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  33. On Logic in the Law: "Something, but Not All".Susan Haack - 2007 - Ratio Juris 20 (1):1-31.
    In 1880, when Oliver Wendell Holmes (later to be a Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court) criticized the logical theology of law articulated by Christopher Columbus Langdell (the first Dean of Harvard Law School), neither Holmes nor Langdell was aware of the revolution in logic that had begun, the year before, with Frege's Begriffsschrift. But there is an important element of truth in Holmes's insistence that a legal system cannot be adequately understood as a system of axioms and corollaries; and (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  34.  93
    The Somatic Marker Hypotheses, and What the Iowa Gambling Task Does and Does Not Show.Giovanna Colombetti - 2008 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 59 (1):51-71.
    Damasio's somatic marker hypothesis (SMH) is a prominent neuroscientific hypothesis about the mechanisms implementing decision-making. This paper argues that, since its inception, the SMH has not been clearly formulated. It is possible to identify at least two different hypotheses, which make different predictions: SMH-G, which claims that somatic states generally implement preferences and are needed to make a decision; and SMH-S, which specifically claims that somatic states assist decision-making by anticipating the long-term outcomes of available options. This paper also (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  35. How (Not) to Bring Psychology and Biology Together.Mark Fedyk - 2015 - Philosophical Studies 172 (4):949-967.
    Evolutionary psychologists often try to “bring together” biology and psychology by making predictions about what specific psychological mechanisms exist from theories about what patterns of behaviour would have been adaptive in the EEA for humans. This paper shows that one of the deepest methodological generalities in evolutionary biology—that proximate explanations and ultimate explanations stand in a many-to-many relation—entails that this inferential strategy is unsound. Ultimate explanations almost never entail the truth of any particular proximate hypothesis. But of course it does (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  36. It's Not NICE to Discriminate.J. Harris - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (7):373-375.
    NICE must not say people are not worth treatingThe National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence has proposed that drugs for the treatment of dementia be banned to National Health Service patients on the grounds that their cost is too high and “outside the range of cost effectiveness that might be considered appropriate for the NHS”i.1This is despite NICE’s admission that these drugs are effective in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease and despite NICE having approved even more expensive treatments. The (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  37. That Many of Us Should Not Parent.Lisa Cassidy - 2001 - Hypatia 21 (4):40-57.
    : In liberal societies (where birth control is generally accepted and available), many people decide whether or not they wish to become parents. One key question in making this decision is, What kind of parent will I be? Parenting competence can be ranked from excellent to competent to poor. Cassidy argues that those who can foresee being poor parents, or even merely competent ones, should opt not to parent.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  38. More Democracy Is Not Better Democracy: Cain's Case for Reform Pluralism.Piers Norris Turner - 2014 - Election Law Journal 13 (4):520-525.
    This article is part of a symposium on Bruce Cain's "Democracy More or Less: America’s Political Reform Quandary." It identifies the basic normative framework of Cain's skeptical "reform pluralism" as a form of democratic instrumentalism rather than political realism, and then argues that a more optimistic instrumentalist alternative is available. The instrumentalist can accept that more democracy need not entail better democracy. But the instrumentalist account of better democracy also gives us reason to believe that significant reform efforts remain (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. The Not so Incredible Shrinking Future.R. Casati & G. Torrengo - 2011 - Analysis 71 (2):240-244.
    Quel bon vent, quel joli vent, ma vie m’appelle, ma vie m’attend French folk song 1. Presentists and Growing Block theorists appeal to ‘powerful intuitions’ when they defend their respective conceptions of time . Eternalists are prepared to go some length towards ‘reconciling’ the view from nowhen with at least some of these intuitions, or try to explain them away . Unaided intuitions may in fact underdetermine any particular metaphysical choice. One set of intuitions about time seems to have been (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  40. How Not to Defend the Unborn.David B. Hershenov & Philip Reed - forthcoming - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy.
    It is sometimes proposed that killing or harming abortion providers is the only logically consistent position available to opponents of abortion. Since lethal violence against morally responsible attackers is normally viewed as justified in order to defend innocent parties, pro-lifers should also think so in the case of the abortion doctor and so they should act to defend the unborn. In our paper, we defend the mainstream pro-life view against killing abortion doctors. We argue that the pro-life view can, (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  41.  33
    Choice is Not the Issue. The Misrepresentation of Healthcare in Bioethical Discourse.Kari Milch Agledahl, Reidun Førde & Åge Wifstad - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (4):212-215.
    Next SectionThe principle of respect for autonomy has shaped much of the bioethics' discourse over the last 50 years, and is now most commonly used in the meaning of respecting autonomous choice. This is probably related to the influential concept of informed consent, which originated in research ethics and was soon also applied to the field of clinical medicine. But while available choices in medical research are well defined, this is rarely the case in healthcare. Consideration of ordinary medical (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  42. What Subjectivity Is Not.Joseph Neisser - 2017 - Topoi 36 (1):41-53.
    An influential thesis in contemporary philosophy of mind is that subjectivity is best conceived as inner awareness of qualia. has argued that this unique subjective awareness generates a paradox which resists empirical explanation. On account of this “paradox of subjective duality,” Levine concludes that the hardest part of the hard problem of consciousness is to explain how anything like a subjective point of view could arise in the world. Against this, I argue that the nature of subjective thought is not (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  43. Measuring Openness and Evaluating Digital Academic Publishing Models: Not Quite the Same Business.Giovanni De Grandis & Yrsa Neuman - 2014 - The Journal of Electronic Publishing 17 (3).
    In this article we raise a problem, and we offer two practical contributions to its solution. The problem is that academic communities interested in digital publishing do not have adequate tools to help them in choosing a publishing model that suits their needs. We believe that excessive focus on Open Access (OA) has obscured some important issues; moreover exclusive emphasis on increasing openness has contributed to an agenda and to policies that show clear practical shortcomings. We believe that academic communities (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  68
    Adoption is Not Abortion‐Lite.Lindsey Porter - 2012 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 29 (1):63-78.
    abstractIt is standardly taken for granted in the literature on the morality of abortion that adoption is almost always an available and morally preferable alternative to abortion — one that does the same thing so far as parenthood is concerned. This assumption pushes proponents of a woman's right to choose into giving arguments that are based almost exclusively around the physicality of pregnancy and childbirth. On the other side of the debate, the assumption that adoption is a real alternative (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  45.  31
    It Might Not Be All That Cloudy.David Sackris - 2014 - Polish Journal of Philosophy 8 (1):67-84.
    Kai von Fintel and Anthony Gillies have proposed a revised contextual analysis of sentences that make use of “might” epistemically. On their view, when a speaker uses an epistemic modal term, several propositions are made available to his conversational partners and, as a result, there are several propositions that may be picked up on by those partners. Because there is no concrete “context of utterance,” there is no one proposition that the speaker could be said to have asserted. This (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  46.  75
    Rationality is Not Fair.Michael Byron - 1995 - Analysis 55 (4):252-260.
    Gauthier argues in Morals by Agreement that morality is derivable from rationality. A crucial premise is that rational bargaining is procedurally fair. Gauthier defends this claim by trying to show that his principle of rational bargaining determines a fair distribution of the overall return from cooperation, including the cooperative surplus. He supports this point in part by the argument from agreement: since (1) procedurally fair principles proportion return to contribution, and since (2) every bargainer has the power to agree in (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  47. The Innocent Eye: Why Vision Is Not a Cognitive Process By Nico Orlandi. [REVIEW]Thomas Polger - 2015 - Analysis 75 (2):343-345.
    In The Innocent Eye, Nico Orlandi argues that vision is not a cognitive process. In particular, she argues that forming subject-level visual representations that are available for reasoning should not itself be understood as a process of inference. This comes to the claim that vision (properly so-called) is a process that produces representations but is not best understood as a process that uses representations.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  22
    Factors Impacting Market Concentration of Not-for-Profit Hospitals.Jomon A. Paul, Benedikt Quosigk & Leo MacDonald - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 154 (2):517-535.
    We attempt to identify and evaluate the association between key characteristics of not-for-profit hospitals and market concentration, as measured by the Herfindahl–Hirschman Index, using data available from the American Hospital Association, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, and the Internal Revenue Service Form 990. Our goal is to provide decision support to policy makers on factors that contribute to market competitiveness, which has been linked to improvements in efficiency, costs, and access to health care. We find that contributions (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  49.  59
    Neuroscience and the Problem of Other Animal Minds: Why It May Not Matter So Much for Neuroethics.Andrew Fenton - 2012 - The Monist 95 (3):463-485.
    A recent argument in the neuroethics literature has suggested that brain-mental-state identities promise to settle epistemological uncertainties about nonhuman animal minds. What’s more, these brain-mental-state identities offer the further promise of dismantling the deadlock over the moral status of nonhuman animals, to positive affect in such areas as agriculture and laboratory animal science. I will argue that neuroscientific claims assuming brain-mental-state identities do not so much resolve the problem of other animal minds as mark its resolution. In the meantime, we (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  50. Democracy is Not a Truth Machine.Thomas Wells - 2013 - Think 12 (33):75-88.
    ExtractIn a democracy people are free to express their opinions and question those of others. This is an important personal freedom, and also essential to the very idea of government by discussion. But it has also been held to be instrumentally important because in open public debate true ideas will conquer false ones by their merit, and the people will see the truth for themselves. In other words, democracy has an epistemic function as a kind of truth machine. From this (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 999