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Oswald Hanfling [82]O. Hanfling [17]
  1. What is Wrong with Sorites Arguments?O. Hanfling - 2001 - Analysis 61 (1):29-35.
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  2.  51
    Wittgenstein and the Human Form of Life.Oswald Hanfling - 2002 - Routledge.
    Wittgenstein's later writings generate a great deal of controversy and debate, as do the implications of his ideas for such topics as consciousness, knowledge, language and the arts. Oswald Hanfling addresses a widespeard tendency to ascribe to Wittgenstein views that go beyond those he actually held. Separate chapters deal with important topics such as the private language argument, rule-following, the problem of other minds, and the ascription of scepticism to Wittgenstein. Describing Wittgenstein as a 'humanist' thinker, he contrasts his views (...)
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  3. Consciousness:'The Last Mystery'.Oswald Hanfling - 2001 - In Severin Schroeder (ed.), Wittgenstein and Contemporary Philosophy of Mind. Palgrave.
     
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  4. Philosophy and Ordinary Language: The Bent and Genius of Our Tongue.Oswald Hanfling - 2000 - Routledge.
    What is philosophy about and what are its methods? _Philosophy and Ordinary Language_ is a defence of the view that philosophy is largely about questions of language, which to a large extent means _ordinary_ language. Some people argue that if philosophy is about ordinary language, then it is necessarily less deep and difficult than it is usually taken to be but Oswald Hanfling shows us that this isn't true. Hanfling, a leading expert in the development of analytic philosophy, covers a (...)
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  5. What Does the Private Language Argument Prove?Oswald Hanfling - 1984 - Philosophical Quarterly 34 (137):468-481.
  6. Life and Meaning: A Reader.Oswald Hanfling (ed.) - 1987 - B. Blackwell in Association with the Open University.
  7. The Quest for Meaning.Oswald Hanfling - 1987 - Open University.
     
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  8. A Gettier Drama.Oswald Hanfling - 2003 - Analysis 63 (3):262–263.
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  9.  57
    How We Trust One Another.Oswald Hanfling - 2008 - Philosophy 83 (2):161-177.
    How is the possibility of promising to be explained without circularity? Appeal is made to the role of natural inclinations in linguistic behaviour, which presupposes truth telling and promise keeping, and also to the social functions of human language which go beyond signalling and transmitting information and which are prior to any explicit conventions. Although promises are broken and lies told, we all have the right to feel resentment when these things happen.
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  10.  49
    The Institutional Theory: A Candidate for Appreciation?Oswald Hanfling - 1999 - British Journal of Aesthetics 39 (2):189-194.
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  11.  72
    Scientific Realism and Ordinary Usage.Oswald Hanfling - 1984 - Philosophical Investigations 7 (3):187-205.
  12.  17
    Five Kinds of Distance.O. Hanfling - 2000 - British Journal of Aesthetics 40 (1):89-102.
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  13.  48
    A Situational Account of Knowledge.Oswald Hanfling - 1985 - The Monist 68 (1):40-56.
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  14.  42
    Was Wittgenstein a Sceptic?Oswald Hanfling - 1985 - Philosophical Investigations 8 (January):1-16.
    According to kripke, Wittgenstein denied certain beliefs about meaning and other minds. But who holds these beliefs? we do "not" believe that "all future applications" of a word are "determined"; nor that "i give directions to myself"; nor that something has to "constitute" meaning. Such beliefs are distortions by realist philosophers; it needs no sceptic to deny them. Wittgenstein's "sympathy with the solipsist" is an illusion, Due to misreadings (and mistranslations) of the text. Wittgenstein's position is clear and does not (...)
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  15.  94
    Philosophical Aesthetics: An Introduction.Oswald Hanfling (ed.) - 1992 - Open University.
    This volume contains surveys of the main issues in philosophical aesthetics, as discussed by thinkers from ancient Greece to modern times.
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  16.  89
    Mental Images.Oswald Hanfling - 1969 - Analysis 30 (April):166-173.
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  17.  35
    Wittgenstein and the Problem of Consciousness.Oswald Hanfling - 2003 - Think 3 (3):99-106.
    You have a rich inner life of conscious experiences. For example, you have pains and other sensations. And you have sensory experiences, such as that produced by chewing on something bitter. Scientists are currently puzzling over how to explain this inner life in scientific terms. Can we, for example, consciousness by appealing to certain facts about our brains?
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  18.  14
    Rights and Human Rights.Oswald Hanfling - 2006 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 58 (58):57-94.
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  19.  76
    Moral Knowledge and Moral Uncertainty.Oswald Hanfling - 2008 - Philosophical Investigations 31 (2):105–123.
    Applying a broadly Wittgensteinian view of knowledge and its relation to the conditions in which the word “know” is ordinarily used, the paper defends the claim that there can be knowledge in moral matters and rejects the idea that a cross‐culturally homogeneous moral language is a necessary condition for this. However, the fact that moral knowledge is available sometimes does not imply that it is available always. Taking issue in particular with Ronald Dworkin, the paper also argues that where moral (...)
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  20.  21
    The Use of 'Theory' in Philosophy.Oswald Hanfling - 2004 - In Erich Ammereller & Eugen Fisher (eds.), Wittgenstein at Work: Method in the Philosophical Investigations. Routledge.
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  21.  61
    The Reality of Dreams.Oswald Hanfling - 1998 - Philosophical Investigations 21 (4):338-344.
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  22.  19
    Machines as Persons?Oswald Hanfling - 1991 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 29:25-34.
    The subject of this symposium is sometimes introduced by asking whether machines could think. This way of introducing it may be misleading, for it may seem as if it were merely about a particular activity, called ‘thinking’. The question would then seem to have the same character as ‘Can machines make a noise?’. But thinking is not something that can be treated in isolation from other personal qualities. What we need to consider is whether, or to what extent, a machine (...)
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  23.  54
    Fact, Fiction and Feeling.Oswald Hanfling - 1996 - British Journal of Aesthetics 36 (4):356-366.
    I consider and reject two kinds of solution of the problem of feelings about fictional objects: that the relevant beliefs are not really different as between fiction and fact; and that the relevant feelings are not 'really the same'. The problem should be seen in the context of different phases in acquiring the relevant feeling-concepts and I distinguish three such phases. The first is necessarily 'presentational': the child is presented with suitable objects or pictures and responds with appropriate feelings, without (...)
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  24.  50
    Learning About Right and Wrong: Ethics and Language.Oswald Hanfling - 2003 - Philosophy 78 (1):25-41.
    The difference between right and wrong is not something that is taught; it is, necessarily, picked up by a child in the course of learning its native language, and parents have no choice about this. In learning the meaning of ‘steal’, for example, the child learns that such actions are wrong. It also develops, through a kind of conditioning, the appropriate feelings and attitudes. The very concept of a reason has a moral content; so that, in acquiring this concept, the (...)
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  25.  44
    Paradoxes of Aesthetic Distance.Oswald Hanfling - 2003 - British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (2):175-186.
    A feature that contributes to the charm of much poetry is its obscurity and indirectness. We want to grasp what the poet is saying and yet, it appears, to do so only with difficulty. How is this preference to be explained? (1) It contributes to promoting an ‘aesthetic attitude’. (2) It conforms to certain general features of human psychology, including (a) a general preference for indirectness and indeterminacy and (b) the pleasure of working things out. Distance, in the relevant sense, (...)
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  26.  32
    Art, Artifact and Function.Oswald Hanfling - 1995 - Philosophical Investigations 18 (1):31-48.
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  27.  10
    Hume and Wittgenstein: Oswald Hanfling.Oswald Hanfling - 1975 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 9:47-65.
    It is well known that Wittgenstein's reading of the philosophical classics was patchy. He left unread a large part of the literature which most philosophers would regard as essential to a knowledge of their subject. Wittgenstein gave an interesting reason for his non-reading of Hume. He said that he could not sit down and read Hume, because he knew far too much about the subject of Hume's writings to find this anything but a torture. In a recent commentary, Peter Hacker (...)
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  28.  15
    'I Heard a Plaintive Melody': ( Philosophical Investigations, P. 209).Oswald Hanfling - 1990 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 28:117-133.
    Asked about Wittgenstein's contribution to aesthetics, one might think first of all of his discussion of ‘family resemblance’ concepts, in which he argued that the various instances of games, for example, need not have any feature or set of features in common, in virtue of which they are all called games; the concept of a game can function perfectly well without any such set of conditions. This insight was soon applied to the much debated quest for a definition of the (...)
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  29.  3
    Philosophical Aesthetics, an Introduction.Oswald Hanfling - 1993 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 51 (4):648-649.
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  30.  26
    Can There Be a Method of Doubt?Oswald Hanfling - 1984 - Philosophy 59 (230):505 - 511.
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  31. Essential Readings in Logical Positivism.Oswald Hanfling (ed.) - 1981 - Blackwell.
  32.  9
    Ayer, Language, Truth and Logic.Oswald Hanfling - 1986 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 20:261-283.
    This is a critical discussion of ayer's famous book. The main topics are: (a) "the criterion of verifiability": whether assertion, Recommendation, Etc.; the meaning of 'verify'; problems of application. (b) analysis and reduction, Including: physical objects; the past; other minds; mathematics and logic; ethics. (c) the nature of philosophy and relation to ordinary language.
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  33.  18
    The Meaning of Life.Oswald Hanfling - 1989 - Cogito 3 (1):63-67.
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  34. Kant's Copernican Revolution Moral Philosophy.Oswald Hanfling - 1972
  35.  5
    A Gettier Drama.O. Hanfling - 2003 - Analysis 63 (3):262-263.
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  36.  19
    Hume's Idea of Necessary Connexion.Oswald Hanfling - 1979 - Philosophy 54 (210):501 - 514.
    The following beliefs can be ascribed to Hume on the basis of his writings: There is no more to our idea of cause and effect than constant conjunction and a resulting habit of mind. There is more to it than that, namely the interaction of bodies. Behind the constant conjunctions, including the interactions of bodies, there are ‘secret’ causes, not knowable by man. The principle of causality is true. Our belief in the principle arises from experience. There is no justification (...)
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  37.  22
    Does Language Need Rules?Oswald Hanfling - 1980 - Philosophical Quarterly 30 (120):193-205.
  38.  2
    Ayer, Language, Truth and Logic: Oswald Hanfling.Oswald Hanfling - 1986 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 20:261-283.
    When, in 1979, A. J. Ayer was asked for an evaluation of his youthful Language, Truth and Logic, he replied: ‘I suppose the most important of the defects was that nearly all of it was false’. Like many of the claims in the book itself, this verdict is open to question. What was wrong with LTL was not so much that what it said was false, but that it presented philosophical issues in an excessively simple and aggressive way. Yet it (...)
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  39.  2
    ‘I Heard a Plaintive Melody’: : Oswald Hanfling.Oswald Hanfling - 1990 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 28:117-133.
    Asked about Wittgenstein's contribution to aesthetics, one might think first of all of his discussion of ‘family resemblance’ concepts, in which he argued that the various instances of games, for example, need not have any feature or set of features in common, in virtue of which they are all called games; the concept of a game can function perfectly well without any such set of conditions. This insight was soon applied to the much debated quest for a definition of the (...)
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  40.  14
    What Is Wrong with the Paradigm Case Argument?Oswald Hanfling - 1990 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 91:21 - 38.
  41.  14
    How Is Scepticism Possible?Oswald Hanfling - 1987 - Philosophy 62 (242):435 - 453.
    Philosophy unties the knots in our thinking, which we have tangled up in an absurd way; but to do that, it must make movements which are just as complicated as the knots. 1 A claim to know can be contradicted in various ways. Which of them does the sceptic have in mind when he denies that we can know—for example, that the sun will rise tomorrow? Does he mean, perhaps, that the proposition is false—that the sun will not rise tomorrow? (...)
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  42.  13
    On the Meaning and Use of "I Know".Oswald Hanfling - 1982 - Philosophical Investigations 5 (3):190-204.
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  43. Hume and Wittgenstein.Oswald Hanfling - 1975 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 9:47-65.
  44.  13
    'Is', 'Ought' and the Voluntaristic Fallacy.Oswald Hanfling - 1997 - Philosophy 72 (282):537 - 548.
    The view that ‘ought’ cannot be deduced from ‘is’, credited to Hume as a major insight into the nature of morality, is surprisingly easy to refute. What they are doing is evil. Therefore, they ought not to do it. Here we have a case of deducing ‘ought’ from ‘is’. The conclusion follows, because ‘ought not’ is analytic to ‘evil’. ‘Ah, but that's just what is wrong with the example: the premise is not a pure “is”; it contains an “ought”, though (...)
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  45.  6
    The Uses and Abuses of Argument.Introduction to Philosophy.Key Concepts.Work, Morality and Human Nature.E. J. Borowski, Oswald Hanfling, Rosalind Hursthouse & Stuart Brown - 1981 - Philosophical Quarterly 31 (123):184.
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  46.  10
    Promises, Games and Institutions.Oswald Hanfling - 1974 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 75:13 - 31.
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  47.  11
    "Thinking", a Widely Ramified Concept.Oswald Hanfling - 1993 - Philosophical Investigations 16 (2):101-115.
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  48.  1
    Philosophical Aesthetics: An Introduction.Oswald Hanfling - 1995 - Philosophical Quarterly 45 (180):410-412.
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  49.  8
    Loving My Neighbour, Loving Myself.Oswald Hanfling - 1993 - Philosophy 68 (264):145 - 157.
    The biblical injunction to love one's neighbour has long been regarded as a central pillar of morality. It is taken to be an ideal which gives direction to our moral aspirations, even though most of us find it difficult to live up to, owing to our selfish natures. But the difficulties I wish to raise are of a logical kind, as distinct from those depending on personal character. They fall under three headings: the first concerns the scope of ‘my neighbour’, (...)
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  50.  6
    Of Human Potential By Israel Scheffler London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1985, Xiii+141 Pp., £14.95. [REVIEW]Oswald Hanfling - 1987 - Philosophy 62 (240):250-.
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