Results for 'Olin M. Robus'

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Olin M. Robus
University of Washington (PhD)
  1.  87
    Does Science License Metaphysics?Olin M. Robus - 2015 - Philosophy of Science 82 (5):845-855.
    Naturalized metaphysicians defend the thesis that science licenses meta- physics, such that only metaphysical results that are based on the best science are to be considered legitimate. This view is problematic, due to the fact that the reasons they identify for such license are apparently self-defeating. Chakravartty defends a revised approach to understanding the licensing relation. I argue that the proposed response is a step forward on behalf of naturalizing metaphysics, but still does not take seriously the contention that science (...)
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  2. Vicious Minds: Virtue Epistemology, Cognition, and Skepticism.Lauren Olin & John M. Doris - 2014 - Philosophical Studies 168 (3):665-692.
    While there is now considerable anxiety about whether the psychological theory presupposed by virtue ethics is empirically sustainable, analogous issues have received little attention in the virtue epistemology literature. This paper argues that virtue epistemology encounters challenges reminiscent of those recently encountered by virtue ethics: just as seemingly trivial variation in context provokes unsettling variation in patterns of moral behavior, trivial variation in context elicits unsettling variation in patterns of cognitive functioning. Insofar as reliability is a condition on epistemic virtue, (...)
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  3.  14
    How Newton Got Lucky: J.D. Trout: Wondrous Truths. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2016, 264pp, $29.95 HB. [REVIEW]Olin Robus - 2017 - Metascience 26 (1):91-94.
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  4.  15
    Empiricism and Intuitionism in Reid's Common Sense Philosophy. By Olin Mckendree Jones M.A., Ph.D. (Princeton University Press. London: Humphrey Milford, Oxford University Press. 1927. Pp. XXV + 134. Price 7s. Net.). [REVIEW]John Laird - 1928 - Philosophy 3 (10):239-.
  5.  11
    The Legend of Romeo and Juliet. Olin H. Moore.J. D. M. Ford - 1951 - Speculum 26 (4):731-732.
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  6. Brill Online Books and Journals.Ellen Meiksins Wood, Ray Kiely, Enzo Traverso, Patrick Murray, Erik Olin Wright, Harry Brighouse, Paresh Chattopadhyay, Chris Arthur, Alex Law & Thomas M. Jeannot - 1997 - Historical Materialism 1 (1).
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  7.  2
    Remembering Erik Olin Wright.Erik Olin Wright - 2019 - Politics and Society 47 (2):147-147.
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  8.  12
    Paradox.Doris Olin - 2003 - Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    Paradoxes are more than just intellectual puzzles - they raise substantive philosophical issues and offer the promise of increased philosophical knowledge. In this introduction to paradox and paradoxes, Doris Olin shows how seductive paradoxes can be, why they confuse and confound, and why they continue to fascinate. Olin examines the nature of paradox, outlining a rigorous definition and providing a clear and incisive statement of what does and does not count as a resolution of a paradox. The view (...)
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  9.  76
    II—M.G.F. Martin.M. G. F. Martin - 1997 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 71 (1):75-98.
  10. String and M-Theory: Answering the Critics. [REVIEW]M. J. Duff - 2013 - Foundations of Physics 43 (1):182-200.
    Using as a springboard a three-way debate between theoretical physicist Lee Smolin, philosopher of science Nancy Cartwright and myself, I address in layman’s terms the issues of why we need a unified theory of the fundamental interactions and why, in my opinion, string and M-theory currently offer the best hope. The focus will be on responding more generally to the various criticisms. I also describe the diverse application of string/M-theory techniques to other branches of physics and mathematics which render the (...)
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  11.  34
    Olin, Quine, and the Surprise Examination.Charles S. Chihara - 1985 - Philosophical Studies 47 (2):191 - 199.
  12.  56
    Subjective Rightness: Holly M. Smith.Holly M. Smith - 2010 - Social Philosophy and Policy 27 (2):64-110.
    Twentieth century philosophers introduced the distinction between “objective rightness” and “subjective rightness” to achieve two primary goals. The first goal is to reduce the paradoxical tension between our judgments of what is best for an agent to do in light of the actual circumstances in which she acts and what is wisest for her to do in light of her mistaken or uncertain beliefs about her circumstances. The second goal is to provide moral guidance to an agent who may be (...)
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  13.  45
    M. Poincaré's Science Et Hypothése.M. PoincarÉ - 1906 - Mind 15 (57):141-b-143.
  14. Setting Things Before the Mind: M.G.F. Martin.M. G. F. Martin - 1998 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 43:157-179.
    Listening to someone from some distance in a crowded room you may experience the following phenomenon: when looking at them speak, you may both hear and see where the source of the sounds is; but when your eyes are turned elsewhere, you may no longer be able to detect exactly where the voice must be coming from. With your eyes again fixed on the speaker, and the movement of her lips a clear sense of the source of the sound will (...)
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  15.  94
    Burge on Perception and Sensation.Lauren Olin - 2016 - Synthese 193 (5):1479-1508.
    In Origins of Objectivity Burge advances a theory of perception according to which perceptions are, themselves, objective representations. The possession of veridicality conditions by perceptual states—roughly, non-propositional analogues of truth-conditions—is central to Burge’s account of how perceptual states differ, empirically and metaphysically, from sensory states. Despite an impressive examination of the relevant empirical literatures, I argue here that Burge has not succeeded in securing a distinction between perception and “mere” sensation.
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  16. Th.O.M.A.S.: An Exploratory Assessment of Theory of Mind in Schizophrenic Subjects.Francesca M. Bosco, Livia Colle, Silvia De Fazio, Adele Bono, Saverio Ruberti & Maurizio Tirassa - 2009 - Cogprints 18 (1):306-319.
    A large body of literature agrees that persons with schizophrenia suffer from a Theory of Mind deficit. However, most empirical studies have focused on third-person, egocentric ToM, underestimating other facets of this complex cognitive skill. Aim of this research is to examine the ToM of schizophrenic persons considering its various aspects, to determine whether some components are more impaired than others. We developed a Theory of Mind Assessment Scale and administered it to 22 persons with a DSM-IV diagnosis of schizophrenia (...)
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  17. H. M. Hyndman: A Rereading and a Reassessment.M. Bevir - 1991 - History of Political Thought 12 (1):125.
  18.  20
    How to Combine Hermeneutics and Wide Reflective Equilibrium?: A Comment on M. Ebbesen and B. Pedersen, How to Formulate Normative Ethical Principles by Use of Empirical Investigations Within Biomedicine.Guy A. M. Widdershoven - 2006 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 10 (1):49-52.
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  19.  72
    Questions for a Theory of Humor.Lauren Olin - 2016 - Philosophy Compass 11 (6):338-350.
    Finding things funny is a pervasive aspect of human mental and social life, but humor has been neglected in the philosophy of mind and cognitive science. Recently, however, there has been a swell of interest in the topic. This essay critically introduces and evaluates contemporary developments in the field, and generates an associated list of questions that a successful theory of humor should be able to answer.
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  20.  19
    The Problem of Circularity in Wollaston's Moral Philosophy.Olin Joynton - 1984 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 22 (4):435-443.
  21. I—R. M. Sainsbury and Michael Tye: An Originalist Theory of Concepts.R. M. Sainsbury & Michael Tye - 2011 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 85 (1):101-124.
    We argue that thoughts are structures of concepts, and that concepts should be individuated by their origins, rather than in terms of their semantic or epistemic properties. Many features of cognition turn on the vehicles of content, thoughts, rather than on the nature of the contents they express. Originalism makes concepts available to explain, with no threat of circularity, puzzling cases concerning thought. In this paper, we mention Hesperus/Phosphorus puzzles, the Evans-Perry example of the ship seen through different windows, and (...)
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  22.  14
    Wollaston’s Theory of Declarative Actions.Olin Joynton - 1981 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 19 (4):439-449.
  23.  65
    ‘Saints and Heroes’: Elizabeth M. Pybus.Elizabeth M. Pybus - 1982 - Philosophy 57 (220):193-199.
    In his article ‘Saints and Heroes’, Urmson argues that traditional moral theories allow at most for a threefold classification of actions in terms of their worth, and that they are therefore unsatisfactory. Since the conclusion of his argument has led to the widespread use of the term ‘acts of supererogation’, and since I do not believe that such acts exist, I propose to argue that the actions with which he is concerned not only can, but should, be contained within the (...)
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  24.  56
    The Prediction Paradox Resolved.Doris Olin - 1983 - Philosophical Studies 44 (2):225 - 233.
  25.  34
    I–T. M. Scanlon.T. M. Scanlon - 2000 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 74 (1):301-317.
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  26.  5
    Strong Gender Egalitarianism.Erik Olin Wright & Harry Brighouse - 2008 - Politics and Society 36 (3):360-372.
    Perhaps the most intractable aspect of gender inequality concerns inequalities within the family around the domestic division of labor, especially over child care and other forms of caregiving. These enduring gender inequalities constitute a significant obstacle to achieving “strong gender egalitarianism”—a structure of social relations in which the division of labor around housework and caregiving within the family and occupational distributions within the public sphere are unaffected by gender. This article explores three kinds of publicly supported parental caregiving leaves that (...)
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  27.  21
    Reconstructing Marxism: Essays on Explanation and the Theory of History.Daniel Little, Erik Olin Wright, Andrew Levine & Elliott Sober - 1994 - Philosophical Review 103 (1):199.
  28. Measuring the Consequences of Rules: Holly M. Smith.Holly M. Smith - 2010 - Utilitas 22 (4):413-433.
    Recently two distinct forms of rule-utilitarianism have been introduced that differ on how to measure the consequences of rules. Brad Hooker advocates fixed-rate rule-utilitarianism, while Michael Ridge advocates variable-rate rule-utilitarianism. I argue that both of these are inferior to a new proposal, optimum-rate rule-utilitarianism. According to optimum-rate rule-utilitarianism, an ideal code is the code whose optimum acceptance level is no lower than that of any alternative code. I then argue that all three forms of rule-utilitarianism fall prey to two fatal (...)
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  29.  38
    The Philosophy of Roderick M. Chisholm. [REVIEW]Timm Triplett, Lewis Edwin Hahn & Roderick M. Chisholm - 2000 - Philosophical Review 109 (3):450.
    In the intellectual autobiography that opens this book, Chisholm divides philosophers into “drones” and “commentators,” placing himself in the first group. As a drone, Chisholm proposed solutions to philosophical problems and asked his students and colleagues to try to refute him. He reports that they often did, sending him back to the drawing board. Chisholm’s wry self-description says much about his manner as well as his method. A more pretentious philosopher might have spoken of his dogged search for philosophical truth (...)
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  30.  26
    [Letter From B. M. Laing].B. M. Laing - 1932 - Philosophy 7 (27):374-374.
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  31. OLIN'S La Creation des Valeurs. [REVIEW]Dobsevage Dobsevage - 1954 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 15:284.
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  32. A Guide to Thinking: A Beginner's Book in Logic.Olin Templin - 1927 - Garden City, NY, USA: Garden City, N.Y., Doubleday, Page & Company.
  33.  37
    M.G. Flaherty, A Watched Pot: How We Experience Time. [REVIEW]M. Holmer Nadesan - 2002 - Human Studies 25 (2):257-265.
  34.  4
    M. Tulli Ciceronis Academica.M. Warren & James S. Reid - 1885 - American Journal of Philology 6 (3):355.
  35. M. DUMMETT "The Seas of Language". [REVIEW]M. J. Frapolli - 1994 - History and Philosophy of Logic 15 (2):245.
  36.  7
    Bezem, M., see Barendsen, E.G. M. Bierman, M. DZamonja, S. Shelah, S. Feferman, G. Jiiger, M. A. Jahn, S. Lempp, Sui Yuefei, S. D. Leonhardi & D. Macpherson - 1996 - Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 79 (1):317.
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  37.  8
    S + T + M = E as a Convergent Model for the Nature of STEM.Candice M. Quinn, Joshua W. Reid & Grant E. Gardner - 2020 - Science & Education 29 (4):881-898.
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  38.  36
    I–Frances M. Kamm.Frances M. Kamm - 2000 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 74 (1):21-39.
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  39.  65
    W. M. Ramsay—The Historical Geography of Asia Minor.W. W. & W. M. Ramsay - 1890 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 11:352-353.
  40.  43
    M. Peterson, The Dimensions of Consequentialism: Ethics, Equality and Risk, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013, 217 Pp., GBP 55.00/ Euro 90.00 , ISBN 9781107033030. [REVIEW]Ralf M. Bader - 2014 - Dialectica 68 (4):620-625.
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  41.  35
    A. M. Mayer's Experiments with Floating Magnets and Their Use in the Atomic Theories of Matter.H. A. M. Snelders - 1976 - Annals of Science 33 (1):67-80.
    In the years 1878 and 1879 the American physicist Alfred Marshall Mayer published his experiments with floating magnets as a didactic illustration of molecular actions and forms. A number of physicists made use of this analogy of molecular structure. For William Thomson they were a mechanical illustration of the kinetic equilibrium of groups of columnar vortices revolving in circles round their common centre of gravity . A number of modifications of Mayer's experiments were described, which gave configurations which were more (...)
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  42. R. M. Adams’s Theodicy of Grace.Richard M. Gale - 1998 - Philo 1 (1):36-44.
    R. M. Adams’s essay, “Must God Create the Best?” can be interpreted as offering a theodicy for God’s creating morally less perfect beings than he could have created. By creating these morally less perfect beings, God is bestowing grace upon them, which is an unmerited or undeserved benefit. He does so, however, in advance of the free moral misdeeds that render them undeserving. This requires that God have middle knowledge, pace Adams’s version of the Free Will Theodicy, of what would (...)
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  43.  26
    Envisioning Real Utopias, Erik Olin Wright, London: Verso, 2010.David F. Ruccio - 2011 - Historical Materialism 19 (4):219-227.
  44. Examples in Epistemology: Socrates, Theaetetus and G. E. Moore: M. F. Burnyeat.M. F. Burnyeat - 1977 - Philosophy 52:381.
    Theaetetus, asked what knowledge is, replies that geometry and the other mathematical disciplines are knowledge, and so are crafts like cobbling. Socrates points out that it does not help him to be told how many kinds of knowledge there are when his problem is to know what knowledge itself is, what it means to call geometry or a craft knowledge in the first place—he insists on the generality of his question in the way he often does when his interlocutor, asked (...)
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  45.  42
    A Case Against Closure.Doris Olin - 2005 - Veritas – Revista de Filosofia da Pucrs 50 (4):235-247.
    Este artigo examina a objeção ao fechamento [dedutivo] que surge no contexto de certos paradoxos epistêmicos, paradoxos cuja conclusão é que a crença justificada pode ser inconsistente. É universalmente aceito que, se essa conclusão é correta, o fechamento deve ser rejeitado, para que se evite a crença justificada em enunciados contraditórios (P, ~P). Mas, mesmo que os argumentos desses paradoxos – o paradoxo da falibilidade (do prefácio) e o paradoxo da loteria – sejam mal-sucedidos, eles, ainda assim, sugerem a existência (...)
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  46.  32
    J. M. H. Fritz, Professional Civility: Communicative Virtue at Work: Peter Lang, New York, 2013, XIV, 273 Pp, ISBN 978-1-4331-1985-9 Hb. [REVIEW]Annette M. Holba - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 115 (3):645-649.
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  47. I'm a Mother, I Worry.Louise M. Antony - 1995 - Content 6:160-166.
  48.  17
    The Sophists. By M. Untersteiner. Translated From the Italian by K. Freeman. Pp. Xvi + 368. Oxford: Blackwell, 1954. 31s. 6d. [REVIEW]G. B. Kerferd, M. Untersteiner & K. Freeman - 1955 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 75:166-167.
  49.  22
    Validation by Touch in Kandinsky's Early Abstract Art.Margaret Olin - 1989 - Critical Inquiry 16 (1):144-172.
    Some recent artists and critics have taken it upon themselves to demystify the notion of stylistic unity. Their task has included the historical reconception of a few “modernist” artists along “postmodern” lines, usually as precursors of current semiotic strategies.11 These artists may have used a set of incompatible styles to expose the artificiality of competing stylistic conventions, or even to challenge the myth that celebrates the authenticity of artistic expressiveness. Pablo Picasso and Marcel Duchamp, otherwise very different artists, have both (...)
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  50.  47
    Sense, Reference and Selective Attention: M.G.F. Martin.M. Martin - 1997 - Supplement to the Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 71 (1):75-98.
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