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  1. Oliver Conolly & Bashar Haydar (2007). Literature, Knowledge, and Value. Philosophy and Literature 31 (1):111-124.
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  2. Oliver Conolly (2005). Pleasure and Pain in Literature. Philosophy and Literature 29 (2):305-320.
  3. Conolly Oliver & Haydar Bashshar (2008). Literature, Politics, and Character. Philosophy and Literature 32 (1):87-101.
  4.  94
    Oliver Conolly & Bashshar Haydar (2001). Narrative Art and Moral Knowledge. British Journal of Aesthetics 41 (2):109-124.
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  5.  56
    Oliver Conolly & Bashshar Haydar (2003). Aesthetic Principles. British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (2):114-125.
    We give reasons for our judgements of works of art. (2) Reasons are inherently general, and hence dependent on principles. (3) There are no principles of aesthetic evaluation. Each of these three propositions seems plausible, yet one of them must be false. Illusionism denies (1). Particularism denies (2). Generalism denies (3). We argue that illusionism depends on an unacceptable account of the use of critical language. Particularism cannot account for the connection between reasons and verdicts in criticism. Generalism comes in (...)
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  6.  67
    Conolly Oliver & Haydar Bashshar (2008). The Case Against Faction. Philosophy and Literature 32 (2):347-358.
    "Faction" is a hybrid genre, aiming at the factual accuracy of journalism on the one hand and the literary form of the novel on the other. There is a fundamental tension however between those two aims, given the constraints which factual accuracy places on characterization, plot, and thematic exploration characteristic of the novel. Further, faction cannot be defended on the grounds that factual accuracy is a literary value in faction. Finally, some aspects of faction, such as its inability to refer (...)
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  7.  73
    Oliver Conolly (2004). Decadent Subjects: The Idea of Decadence in Art, Literature, Philosophy and Culture of the Fin de Siècle in Europe. British Journal of Aesthetics 44 (2):199-202.
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  8.  32
    Oliver Conolly (2003). Reports on Philosophy, No. 19, 1999: Reconsidering Aesthetics. British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (2):201-203.
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  9.  26
    Oliver Conolly & Bashshar Haydar (2005). Irreversible Generalism: A Reply to Dickie. British Journal of Aesthetics 45 (3):289-295.
    Irreversible generalism, the view that reasons given for the evaluation of art are general and do not admit of exceptions, is defended from the criticisms levelled against it by George Dickie in ‘Reading Sibley’. The authors' view that Frank Sibley adhered to a form of reversible generalism, the view that reasons given for the evaluation of art are general but can sometimes become reasons to disvalue artworks, according to which there a criterion for distinguishing valenced from neutral aesthetic properties, is (...)
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  10.  5
    Oliver Conolly (1998). Pity, Tragedy and the Pathos of Distance. European Journal of Philosophy 6 (3):277–296.
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