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  1.  25
    Fairness, Fast and Slow: A Review of Dual Process Models of Fairness.Bjørn Hallsson, Hartwig R. Siebner & Oliver J. Hulme - 2018 - Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews 89:49-60.
    Fairness, the notion that people deserve or have rights to certain resources or kinds of treatment, is a fundamental dimension of moral cognition. Drawing on recent evidence from economics, psychology, and neuroscience, we ask whether self-interest is always intuitive, requiring self-control to override with reasoning-based fairness concerns, or whether fairness itself can be intuitive. While we find strong support for rejecting the notion that self-interest is always intuitive, the literature has reached conflicting conclusions about the neurocognitive systems underpinning fairness. We (...)
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  2.  5
    Extending Models of “How Foraging Works”: Uncertainty, Controllability, and Survivability.Oliver J. Hulme & Duda Kvitsiani - 2019 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 42.
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    The “Mesh” as Evidence–Model Comparison and Alternative Interpretations of Feedback.Oliver J. Hulme & Louise Whiteley - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (5-6):505-506.
    We agree that the relationship between phenomenology and accessibility can be fruitfully investigated via meshing, but we want to emphasise the importance of proper comparison between meshes, as well as considerations that make comparison especially difficult in this domain. We also argue that Block's interpretation of the neural data in his exemplar mesh is incorrect, and propose an alternative.
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