Results for 'Omnipresence'

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  1. Omnipresence and the Location of the Immaterial.Ross Inman - 2017 - In Jonathan Kvanvig (ed.), Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Religion, Volume 7. Oxford University Press.
    I first offer a broad taxonomy of models of divine omnipresence in the Christian tradition, both past and present. I then examine the recent model proposed by Hud Hudson (2009, 2014) and Alexander Pruss (2013)—ubiquitous entension—and flag a worry with their account that stems from predominant analyses of the concept of ‘material object’. I then attempt to show that ubiquitous entension has a rich Latin medieval precedent in the work of Augusine and Anselm. I argue that the model of (...)
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  2. Newton's Ontology of Omnipresence and Infinite Space.J. E. McGuire & Edward Slowik - 2013 - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 6:279-308.
    This essay explores the role of God’s omnipresence in Newton’s natural philosophy, with special emphasis placed on how God is related to space. Unlike Descartes’ conception, which denies the spatiality of God, or Gassendi and Charleton’s view, which regards God as completely whole in every part of space, it is argued that Newton accepts spatial extension as a basic aspect of God’s omnipresence. The historical background to Newton’s spatial ontology assumes a large part of our investigation, but with (...)
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  3.  62
    God is Where God Acts: Reconceiving Divine Omnipresence.James Arcadi - 2017 - Topoi 36 (4):631-639.
    In classical theism, God is typically conceived of as having the attribute of omnipresence. However, this attribute often falls prey to two puzzles, the immateriality puzzle and the intensity puzzle. A recent explication of omnipresence by Hud Hudson falls short of solving these puzzles. By attending to key narratives in the Hebrew Scriptures, I argue that one ought to conceive of God’s presence at a location as God’s acting at that location. Thus, God’s omnipresence is God’s acting (...)
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  4. Is God a Zombie? Divine Consciousness and Omnipresence.Raphaël Millière - 2014 - International Journal of Philosophy and Theology 75 (1):38-54.
    While nobody will ever know what it may be like to be God, there is a more basic question one may try to answer: does God have phenomenal consciousness, does He have experiences within a conscious point of view (POV)? Drawing on recent debates within philosophy of mind, I argue that He doesn’t: if God exists, ‘He’ is not phenomenally conscious, at least in the sense that there is no ‘divine subjectivity’. The article aims at displaying an incompatibility between God’s (...)
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  5.  4
    L'omniprésence de Dieu. Descartes face à More 1648-1649.Lynda Gaudemard - 2014 - Journal of Early Modern Studies 3 (2):32-53.
    In this paper, I shall suggest that, what Descartes supported in his letter to More of August 1649, when he claimed that God’s essence might be present everywhere, was not that God can’t exist without being extended, i.e. being omnipresent, but that God has necessarily the disposition to be extended. If my interpretation is correct, then the claim that God’s essence is omnipresent is consistent with the thesis that God is omnipresent ratione potentiæ.
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  6. Omnipresence, Indwelling, and the Second-Personal.Eleonore Stump - 2013 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 5 (4):29--53.
    The claim that God is maximally present is characteristic of all three major monotheisms. In this paper, I explore this claim with regard to Christianity. First, God’s omnipresence is a matter of God’s relations to all space at all times at once, because omnipresence is an attribute of an eternal God. In addition, God is also present with and to a person. The assumption of a human nature ensures that God is never without the ability to be present (...)
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  7.  71
    Omnipresence.Hud Hudson - 2008 - In Thomas P. Flint & Michael C. Rea (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophical Theology. Oxford University Press.
    According to the tradition of western theism, God is said to enjoy the attribute of being everywhere present. But what is it, exactly, for God to manifest ubiquitous presence? Well, presumably, it is for God to bear a certain relation – the ‘being present at’ relation – to every place. This article focuses on the ‘being present at’ relation which figures so prominently in the divine attribute of omnipresence, on both fundamental and derivative readings of that relation, and on (...)
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  8.  91
    Anselmian Spacetime: Omnipresence and the Created Order.Christopher H. Conn - 2011 - Heythrop Journal 52 (2):260-270.
    For Anselm, the attribute of omnipresence is not merely concerned with where God exists, but with where and when God exists. His account of this attribute thus precipitates a discourse on the nature of space and time: how they are related to God, to one another, and to the rest of the created order. In the course of this analysis Anselm articulates a number of positions which are generally thought to be the sole possession of modernity. In Part One (...)
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  9.  10
    God’s Omnipresence.Joseph Jedwab - 2016 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 8 (2):129--149.
    I defend Christian classical theism’s view that God is aspatial in the strict sense but omnipresent only in a loose sense. I consider ten different proposals according to which God is strictly omnipresent and reject them all. I then present two arguments for the claim that God is strictly aspatial. Finally, I argue that, given God creates and sustains all else, God is loosely omnipresent.
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  10. Omnipresence Ad the Location of the Immaterial.Ross D. Inman - 2017 - Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Religion 8:167-206.
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  11.  54
    Divine Omnipresence and Maximal Immanence: Supernaturalism Versus Pantheism.Robert Oakes - 2006 - American Philosophical Quarterly 43 (2):171 - 179.
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  12. Omnipotence, Omniscience, and Omnipresence.William J. Wainwright - 2010 - In Charles Taliaferro & Chad V. Meister (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Christian Philosophical Theology. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  13.  14
    Rethinking Divine Spatiality: Divine Omnipresence in Philosophical and Theological Perspective.James R. Gordon - 2018 - Heythrop Journal 59 (3):534-543.
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  14.  27
    Emptiness and Omnipresence: An Essential Introduction to Tiantai Buddhism.Brook A. Ziporyn - 2016 - Indiana University Press.
    Tiantai Buddhism emerged from an idiosyncratic and innovative interpretation of the Lotus Sutra to become one of the most complete, systematic, and influential schools of philosophical thought developed in East Asia. Brook A. Ziporyn puts Tiantai into dialogue with modern philosophical concerns to draw out its implications for ethics, epistemology, and metaphysics. Ziporyn explains Tiantai’s unlikely roots, its positions of extreme affirmation and rejection, its religious skepticism and embrace of religious myth, and its view of human consciousness. Ziporyn reveals the (...)
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  15. Presence and Omnipresence.Eleonore Stump - 2008 - In Philip L. Quinn & Paul J. Weithman (eds.), Liberal Faith: Essays in Honor of Philip Quinn. University of Notre Dame Press.
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  16.  86
    Omnipresence.Edward Wierenga - 2019 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  17.  20
    Omnipresence, Multipresence and Ubiquity: Kinds of Generality in and Around Mathematics and Logics. [REVIEW]I. Grattan-Guinness - 2011 - Logica Universalis 5 (1):21-73.
    A prized property of theories of all kinds is that of generality, of applicability or least relevance to a wide range of circumstances and situations. The purpose of this article is to present a pair of distinctions that suggest that three kinds of generality are to be found in mathematics and logics, not only at some particular period but especially in developments that take place over time: ‘omnipresent’ and ‘multipresent’ theories, and ‘ubiquitous’ notions that form dependent parts, or moments, of (...)
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  18.  71
    Incarnation, Omnipresence, and Action at a Distance.Richard Cross - 2003 - Neue Zeitschrift für Systematicsche Theologie Und Religionsphilosophie 45 (3):293-312.
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  19.  43
    Anselm on Omnipresence.Edward Wierenga - 1988 - New Scholasticism 62 (1):30-41.
  20.  56
    Anselm on Omnipresence.Brian Leftow - 1989 - New Scholasticism 63 (3):326-357.
  21. Omnipresence and Tough Choices.E. J. Coffman - 2011 - In Jonathan L. Kvanvig (ed.), Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Religion Volume 3. Oxford University Press.
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  22.  20
    God’s Omnipresence in the World: On Possible Meanings of ‘En’ in Panentheism.Georg Gasser - 2019 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 85 (1):43-62.
    Panenetheism is the claim that God and the cosmos are intimately inter-related, with the cosmos being in God and God being in the cosmos. What does this exactly mean? The aim of this paper is to address this question by sheding light on four possible models of God-world-inter-relatedness. Being critical of those models, which understand maximal immanence in a literal, spatial sense, the paper argues in favor of a model, which cashes out immanence in terms of divine activity. God is, (...)
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  23.  19
    Against the Fundamental‐Reading of Anselm's Account of Omnipresence.Matthew James Collier - 2018 - Heythrop Journal.
  24. Omnipresence and Tough Choices.E. J. Coffman - 2011 - Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Religion 3 (1).
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  25.  7
    Plotinus on the Soul's Omnipresence in Body.Gary Gurtler - 2008 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 2 (2):113-127.
    In examining Ennead VI 4[22], we find Plotinus in conflict with modern, i.e., Cartesian or Kantian, assumptions about the relation of soul and body and the identification of the self with the subject. Curiously, his images and exposition are more in tune with Twentieth Century notions such as wave and field. With these as keys, we are in a position to unlock the subtlety of Plotinus' analysis of the way soul and body are present together, with sensation structured through the (...)
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  26.  37
    Is Power All There Is?: Michel Foucault and the "Omnipresence" of Power Relations.Richard A. Lynch - 1998 - Philosophy Today 42 (1):65-70.
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  27.  34
    Plotinus on the Soul's Omnipresence in Body.S. . J. Gurtler & M. Gary - 2008 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 2 (2):113-127.
    The limitation of act by potency, central in the metaphysics of Thom as Aquinas, has its origins in Plotinus. He transforms Aristotle ’s horizontal causality of change into a vertical causality of participation. Potency and infinity are not just un intelligible lack of limit, but productive power. Form determines matter but is limited by recepti on into matter. The experience of unity begins with sensible things, which always have parts, so what is really one is incorporeal, without division and separation. (...)
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  28.  10
    Against the Fundamental‐Reading of Anselm's Account of Omnipresence.Matthew James - forthcoming - Heythrop Journal.
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  29.  48
    Aquinas on God's Omnipresence and Timelessness.Richard R. La Croix - 1982 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 42 (3):391-399.
  30. Plotinus on the Soul's Omnipresence in Body.J. S. & M. Gary - 2008 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 2 (2):113-127.
    In examining Ennead VI 4[22], we find Plotinus in conflict with modern, i.e., Cartesian or Kantian, assumptions about the relation of soul and body and the identification of the self with the subject. Curiously, his images and exposition are more in tune with Twentieth Century notions such as wave and field. With these as keys, we are in a position to unlock the subtlety of Plotinus' analysis of the way soul and body are present together, with sensation structured through the (...)
     
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  31.  15
    Luco J. Van den Brom. Divine Presence in the World: A Critical Analysis of the Notion of Divine Omnipresence. Studies in Philosophical Theology, 5. Pp. Ix+316. F. 82.90. [REVIEW]Alan G. Padgett - 1995 - Religious Studies 31 (3):409.
  32. The Problem of Omnipresence in Plotinus Ennead VI, 4:5: A Reply.Dominic O’Meara - 1980 - Dionysius 4:61-73.
     
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  33.  9
    The Omnipresence of Being, The Intellect-Intelligible Identity and the Undescending Part of the Soul.Atsushi Sumi - 2002 - In Paulos Gregorios (ed.), Neoplatonism and Indian Philosophy. State University of New York Press. pp. 9--45.
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  34.  6
    Sur l'Omniprésence du Mensonge Dans le Discours.Blanche-Noelle Grunig - 1988 - Argumentation 2 (1):117-132.
    Three levels are proposed to explain lying as a process in discourse production, to characterize different types of lies and to distinguish them from mistakes, ignorance and forgetting as well fr from ill-timed or irrelevant utterances.
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  35.  5
    An Historical Study of the Doctrine of the Omnipresence of God in Selected Writings Between 1220-1270. A Dissertation By Adrian Fuerst, O. S. B. [REVIEW]Eligius M. Buytaert - 1953 - Franciscan Studies 13 (2-3):217-219.
  36.  4
    Biology of Purinergic Signalling: Its Ancient Evolutionary Roots, its Omnipresence and its Multiple Functional Significance.Alexei Verkhratsky & Geoffrey Burnstock - 2014 - Bioessays 36 (7):697-705.
  37. Omnipresence in Eriugena.Stephen Gersh - 1980 - In Werner Beierwaltes (ed.), Eriugena: Studien Zu Seinen Quellen: Vorträge des Iii. Internationalen Eriugena-Colloquiums, Freiburg Im Breisgau, 27.-30. August 1979. C. Winter.
     
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  38. The Omnipresence of Being: A Study in Plotinian Metaphysics.Jonathan Scott Lee - 1978 - Dissertation, The University of Connecticut
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  39. How to Be Omnipresent.Sam Cowling & Wesley D. Cray - 2017 - American Philosophical Quarterly 54 (3):223-234.
    Attributions of omnipresence, most familiar within the philosophy of religion, typically take the omnipresence of an entity to either consist in that entity's occupation of certain regions or be dependent upon other of that entity's attributes, such as omnipotence or omniscience. This paper defends an alternative conception of omnipresence that is independent of other purported divine attributes and dispenses with occupation. The resulting view repurposes the metaphysics of necessitism and permanentism, taking omnipresent entities to be those entities (...)
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  40. The Divine Attributes.Nicholas Everitt - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (1):78-90.
    Focusing on God's essential attributes of omnipotence, omniscience, being eternal and omnipresent, being a creator and sustainer, and being a person, I examine how far recent discussion has been able to provide for each of these divine attributes a consistent interpretation. I also consider briefly whether the attributes are compatible with each other.
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  41. Life, Death, and the Hiddenness of God.Robert Oakes - 2008 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 64 (3):155 - 160.
    Many philosophers have contended that (traditional) theism or supernaturalism suffers from what can properly be called the Problem of Divine Hiddenness (the PDH ). [See Howard-Snyder and Moser 2002]. Moreover, it is the contention of many proponents of the PDH that this “problem,” if, indeed, not just a component of the “problem of evil,” bears a striking similarity to the latter. Specifically, at the heart of this ostensible difficulty for theism is that Divine “Hiddenness,” like pain and suffering—or at least (...)
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  42.  53
    Newton and God's Sensorium.Patrick J. Connolly - 2014 - Intellectual History Review 24 (2):185-201.
    In the Queries to the Latin version of the Opticks Newton claims that space is God’s sensorium. Although these passages are well-known, few commentators have offered interpretations of what Newton might have meant by these cryptic remarks. As is well known, Leibniz was quick to pounce on these passages as evidence that Newton held untenable or nonsensical views in metaphysics and theology. Subsequent commentators have largely agreed. This paper has two goals. The first is to offer a clear interpretation of (...)
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  43. What is Fake News?Romy Jaster & David Lanius - 2018 - Versus 2 (127):207-227.
    Recently, the term «fake news» has become ubiquitous in political and public discourse and the media. Despite its omnipresence, however, it is anything but clear what fake news is. An adequate and comprehensive definition of fake news is called for. We take steps towards this goal by providing a systematic account of fake news that makes the phenomenon tangible, rehabilitates the use of the term, and helps us to set fake news apart from related phenomena. (You can email us (...)
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  44. What is 'Normal'? An Evolution-Theoretic Foundation for Normic Laws and Their Relation to Statistical Normality.Gerhard Schurz - 2001 - Philosophy of Science 68 (4):476-497.
    Normic laws have the form "if A, then normally B." They are omnipresent in everyday life and non-physical 'life' sciences such as biology, psychology, social sciences, and humanities. They differ significantly from ceteris-paribus laws in physics. While several authors have doubted that normic laws are genuine laws at all, others have argued that normic laws express a certain kind of prototypical normality which is independent of statistical majority. This paper presents a foundation for normic laws which is based on generalized (...)
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  45. Husserl’s Transcendental Philosophy and the Critique of Naturalism.Dermot Moran - 2008 - Continental Philosophy Review 41 (4):401-425.
    Throughout his career, Husserl identifies naturalism as the greatest threat to both the sciences and philosophy. In this paper, I explicate Husserl’s overall diagnosis and critique of naturalism and then examine the specific transcendental aspect of his critique. Husserl agreed with the Neo-Kantians in rejecting naturalism. He has three major critiques of naturalism: First, it (like psychologism and for the same reasons) is ‘countersensical’ in that it denies the very ideal laws that it needs for its own justification. Second, naturalism (...)
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  46. Wittgenstein, Modern Music, and the Myth of Progress.Eran Guter - 2017 - In Ilkka Niiniluoto & Thomas Wallgren (eds.), On the Human Condition – Essays in Honour of Georg Henrik von Wright’s Centennial Anniversary, Acta Philosophica Fennica vol. 93. Helsinki: Societas Philosophica Fennica. pp. 181-199.
    Georg Henrik von Wright was not only the first interpreter of Wittgenstein, who argued that Spengler’s work had reinforced and helped Wittgenstein to articulate his view of life, but also the first to consider seriously that Wittgenstein’s attitude to his times makes him unique among the great philosophers, that the philosophical problems which Wittgenstein was struggling, indeed his view of the nature of philosophy, were somehow connected with features of our culture or civilization. -/- In this paper I draw inspiration (...)
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  47.  24
    The Anthropology of Immortality and the Crisis of Posthuman Conscience.Antonio Sandu - 2015 - Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 14 (40):3-26.
    In this article we aim to distinguish between the transhuman and posthuman condition, according to their anthropological, ontological, and ethical natures. We will show that the current historical moment can be considered the beginning of a transhuman civilisation, given that the characteristics of the transhuman are already present in today’s human being. We will show that a series of decisive limitations for belonging to the human condition are in the process of being transcended due to acquisition of attributes of divinity (...)
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  48.  15
    An Incarnational Model of the Eucharist.James Arcadi - 2018 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    The Eucharist is at the heart of Christian worship and at the heart of the Eucharist are the curious phrases, 'This is my body' and 'This is my blood'. James M. Arcadi offers a constructive proposal for understanding Christ's presence in the Eucharist that draws on contemporary conceptual resources and is faithful to the history of interpretation. He locates his proposal along a spectrum of Eucharistic theories. Arcadi explores the motif of God's presence related to divine omnipresence and special (...)
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  49.  70
    Hybrids, Pure Cultures, and Pure Lines: From Nineteenth-Century Biology to Twentieth-Century Genetics.Staffan Müller-Wille - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 38 (4):796-806.
    Prompted by recent recognitions of the omnipresence of horizontal gene transfer among microbial species and the associated emphasis on exchange, rather than isolation, as the driving force of evolution, this essay will reflect on hybridization as one of the central concerns of nineteenth-century biology. I will argue that an emphasis on horizontal exchange was already endorsed by ‘biology’ when it came into being around 1800 and was brought to full fruition with the emergence of genetics in 1900. The true (...)
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  50. Frog and Toad Lose Control.Jeanette Kennett & Michael Smith - 1996 - Analysis 56 (2):63–73.
    It seems to be a truism that whenever we do something - and so, given the omnipresence of trying (Hornsby 1980), whenever we try to do something - we want to do that thing more than we want to do anything else we can do (Davidson 1970). However, according to Frog, when we have will power we are able to try not to do something that we ‘really want to do’. In context the idea is clearly meant to be (...)
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