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Owen Flanagan [99]Owen J. Flanagan [29]Owen J. Flanagan Jr [4]Owen Joseph Flanagan [1]
  1. Consciousness Reconsidered.Owen J. Flanagan - 1992 - MIT Press.
    Owen Flanagan argues that we are on the way to understanding consciousness and its place in the natural order.
  2. The Science of the Mind.Owen J. Flanagan - 1984 - MIT Press.
    Consciousness emerges as the key topic in this second edition of Owen Flanagan's popular introduction to cognitive science and the philosophy of psychology....
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  3. Varieties of moral personality: ethics and psychological realism.Owen Flanagan - 1991 - Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
    Owen Flanagan argues in this book for a more psychologically realistic ethical reflection and spells out the ways in which psychology can enrich moral philosophy. Beginning with a discussion of such "moral saints" as Gandhi, Mother Teresa, and Oskar Shindler, Flanagan charts a middle course between an ethics that is too realistic and socially parochial and one that is too idealistic, giving no weight to our natures.
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  4. The Nature of Consciousness: Philosophical Debates.Ned Block, Owen Flanagan & Guven Guzeldere (eds.) - 1997 - MIT Press.
    " -- "New Scientist" Intended for anyone attempting to find their way through the large and confusingly interwoven philosophical literature on consciousness, ..
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  5.  85
    The Really Hard Problem: Meaning in a Material World.Owen Flanagan - 2007 - Bradford.
    If consciousness is "the hard problem" in mind science -- explaining how the amazing private world of consciousness emerges from neuronal activity -- then "the really hard problem," writes Owen Flanagan in this provocative book, is explaining how meaning is possible in the material world. How can we make sense of the magic and mystery of life naturalistically, without an appeal to the supernatural? How do we say truthful and enchanting things about being human if we accept the fact that (...)
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  6.  49
    Consciousness Reconsidered.Joseph Levine & Owen Flanagan - 1994 - Philosophical Review 103 (2):353.
  7.  27
    The Geography of Morals: Varieties of Moral Possibility.Owen Flanagan - 2016 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    The Geography of Morals is a work of extraordinary ambition: an indictment of the parochialism of Western philosophy, a comprehensive dialogue between cultural and psychological anthropology, recent work in empirical moral psychology, behavioral economics, and cross-cultural philosophy.
  8. Consciousness.Owen J. Flanagan - 1984 - In The Science of the Mind. MIT Press.
  9.  55
    The Bodhisattva's Brain: Buddhism Naturalized.Owen Flanagan - 2011 - Cambridge, Massachusetts: Bradford.
    If we are material beings living in a material world -- and all the scientific evidence suggests that we are -- then we must find existential meaning, if there is such a thing, in this physical world. We must cast our lot with the natural rather than the supernatural. Many Westerners with spiritual inclinations are attracted to Buddhism -- almost as a kind of moral-mental hygiene. But, as Owen Flanagan points out in The Bodhisattva's Brain, Buddhism is hardly naturalistic. In (...)
  10.  24
    Varieties of Moral Personality: Ethics and Psychological Realism.Owen Flanagan - 1991 - Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press.
    Owen Flanagan argues in this book for a more psychologically realistic ethical reflection and spells out the ways in which psychology can enrich moral philosophy. Beginning with a discussion of such "moral saints" as Gandhi, Mother Teresa, and Oskar Schindler, Flanagan charts a middle course between an ethics that is too realistic and socially parochial and one that is too idealistic, giving no weight to our natures.
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  11. Naturalizing ethics.Owen Flanagan, Hagop Sarkissian & David Wong - 2015 - In Kelly James Clark (ed.), The Blackwell Companion to Naturalism. Hoboken: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 16-33.
    In this essay we provide (1) an argument for why ethics should be naturalized, (2) an analysis of why it is not yet naturalized, (3) a defense of ethical naturalism against two fallacies—Hume’s and Moore’s—that ethical naturalism allegedly commits, and (4) a proposal that normative ethics is best conceived as part of human ecology committed to pluralistic relativism. We explain why naturalizing ethics both entails relativism and also constrains it, and why nihilism about value is not an especially worrisome for (...)
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  12.  55
    Consciousness Reconsidered.Raw Feeling: a Philosophical Account of the Essence of Consciousness.Owen Flanagan & Robert Kirk - 1996 - Philosophical Quarterly 46 (184):417-421.
  13.  39
    How to Do Things with Emotions: The Morality of Anger and Shame Across Cultures.Owen Flanagan - 2021 - Princeton University Press.
    An expansive look at how culture shapes our emotions—and how we can benefit, as individuals and a society, from less anger and more shame The world today is full of anger. Everywhere we look, we see values clashing and tempers rising, in ways that seem frenzied, aimless, and cruel. At the same time, we witness political leaders and others who lack any sense of shame, even as they display carelessness with the truth and the common good. In How to Do (...)
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  14. Naturalizing ethics.Owen Flanagan, Hagop Sarkissian & David Wong - 2007 - In Walter Sinnott-Armstrong (ed.), Moral Psychology: The Evolution of Morality: Adaptations and Innateness. Bradford. pp. 1-26.
    In this essay we provide (1) an argument for why ethics should be naturalized, (2) an analysis of why it is not yet naturalized, (3) a defense of ethical naturalism against two fallacies—Hume’s and Moore’s—that ethical naturalism allegedly commits, and (4) a proposal that normative ethics is best conceived as part of human ecology committed to pluralistic relativism. We explain why naturalizing ethics both entails relativism and also constrains it, and why nihilism about value is not an especially worrisome for (...)
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  15. Self expressions: mind, morals, and the meaning of life.Owen Flanagan - 1996 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Human beings have the unique ability to consciously reflect on the nature of the self. But reflection has its costs. We can ask what the self is, but as David Hume pointed out, the self, once reflected upon, may be nowhere to be found. The favored view is that we are material beings living in the material world. But if so, a host of destabilizing questions surface. If persons are just a sophisticated sort of animal, then what sense is there (...)
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  16. The Problem of the Soul Two Visions of Mind and How to Reconcile Them.Owen Flanagan - 2002 - New York: Basic Books.
    Traditional ideas about the basic nature of humanity are under attack as never before. The very attributes that make us human--free will, the permanence of personal identity, the existence of the soul--are being undermined and threatened by the current revolution in the science of the mind. If the mind is the brain, and therefore a physical object subject to deterministic laws, how can we have free will? If most of our thoughts and impulses are unconscious, how can we be morally (...)
  17. Justice, care, and gender: The Kohlberg-Gilligan debate revisited.Owen Flanagan & Kathryn Jackson - 1987 - Ethics 97 (3):622-637.
  18.  21
    Virtue and Ignorance.Owen Flanagan - 1990 - Journal of Philosophy 87 (8):420.
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  19. Dreaming Souls: Sleep, Dreams, and the Evolution of the Conscious Mind: Sleep, Dreams, and the Evolution of the Conscious Mind.Owen Flanagan - 2000 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    What, if anything, do dreams tell us about ourselves? What is the relationship between types of sleep and types of dreams? Does dreaming serve any purpose? Or are dreams simply meaningless mental noise--"unmusical fingers wandering over the piano keys"? With expertise in philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience, Owen Flanagan is uniquely qualified to answer these questions. In this groundbreaking work, he provides both an accessible survey of the latest research on sleep and dreams and a compelling new theory about the nature (...)
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  20.  95
    The Moral Psychology of Anger.Myisha Cherry & Owen Flanagan (eds.) - 2017 - London: Rowman & Littlefield.
    The Moral Psychology of Anger is the first comprehensive study of the moral psychology of anger from a philosophical perspective. The collection provides an inclusive view of anger from a variety of philosophical perspectives.
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  21. Zombies and the function of consciousness.Owen J. Flanagan & Thomas W. Polger - 1995 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 2 (4):313-21.
    Todd Moody’s Zombie Earth thought experiment is an attempt to show that ‘conscious inessentialism’ is false or in need of qualification. We defend conscious inessentialism against his criticisms, and argue that zombie thought experiments highlight the need to explain why consciousness evolved and what function(s) it serves. This is the hardest problem in consciousness studies.
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  22.  43
    Identity, Character, and Morality: Essays in Moral Psychology,.Owen J. Flanagan & Amélie Rorty (eds.) - 1989 - MIT Press.
    Many philosophers believe that normative ethics is in principle independent of psychology. By contrast, the authors of these essays explore the interconnections between psychology and moral theory. They investigate the psychological constraints on realizable ethical ideals and articulate the psychological assumptions behind traditional ethics. They also examine the ways in which the basic architecture of the mind, core emotions, patterns of individual development, social psychology, and the limits on human capacities for rational deliberation affect morality.
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  23.  70
    Moral Issues of Human-Non-Human Primate Neural Grafting.Mark Greene, Kathryn Schill, Shoji Takahashi, Alison Bateman-House, Tom Beauchamp, Hilary Bok, Dorothy Cheney, Joseph Coyle, Terrence Deacon, Daniel Dennett, Peter Donovan, Owen Flanagan, Steven Goldman, Henry Greely, Lee Martin & Earl Miller - 2005 - Science 309 (5733):385-386.
    The scientific, ethical, and policy issues raised by research involving the engraftment of human neural stem cells into the brains of nonhuman primates are explored by an interdisciplinary working group in this Policy Forum. The authors consider the possibility that this research might alter the cognitive capacities of recipient great apes and monkeys, with potential significance for their moral status.
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  24. Virtue and ignorance.Owen Flanagan - 1990 - Journal of Philosophy 87 (8):420-428.
  25.  45
    Neuroexistentialism.Owen Flanagan & Gregg D. Caruso - 2018 - The Philosophers' Magazine 83:68-72.
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  26.  21
    Naturalizing Epistemic Virtue.Abrol Fairweather & Owen Flanagan (eds.) - 2014 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    An epistemic virtue is a personal quality conducive to the discovery of truth, the avoidance of error, or some other intellectually valuable goal. Current work in epistemology is increasingly value-driven, but this volume presents the first collection of essays to explore whether virtue epistemology can also be naturalistic, in the philosophical definition meaning 'methodologically continuous with science'. The essays examine the empirical research in psychology on cognitive abilities and personal dispositions, meta-epistemic semantic accounts of virtue theoretic norms, the role of (...)
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  27.  87
    Neuroexistentialism: Meaning, Morals, and Purpose in the Age of Neuroscience.Gregg D. Caruso & Owen J. Flanagan (eds.) - 2018 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Neuroexistentialism brings together some of the world's leading philosophers, neuroscientists, cognitive scientists, and legal scholars to tackle our neuroexistentialist predicament and explore what the mind sciences can tell us about morality, love, emotion, autonomy, consciousness, selfhood, free will, moral responsibility, criminal punishment, meaning in life, and purpose.
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  28. The Varieties of Moral Personality.Owen Flanagan, Paul Ricoeur, Leroy Rouner, Charles Taylor & Ernest Wallwork - 1994 - Journal of Religious Ethics 22 (1):187-210.
    Views of the self may be plotted on a set of coordinates. On the axis that runs from fragmentation to unity, Rorty and Rorty's Freud champion the decentered self while Wallwork, Taylor, and Ricoeur argue for a sovereign, unified self. On the other axis, which runs from the disengaged, inward-turning self to the engaged and "sedimented" self, Wallwork, would be positioned near Rorty, defending self-creation against the narrative identity affirmed by Taylor and Ricoeur. Despite his skepticism concerning the communitarian agenda (...)
     
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  29. What Is It Like to Be an Addict?Owen Flanagan - 2011 - In Jeffrey Poland (ed.). MIT Press. pp. 269-292.
    This chapter presents a reflective, critical position toward the author’s own addiction and toward himself as an addict. It presents the question of whether addressing addiction as a disease is useful; the idea of addiction as a disease seems less useful in describing “what it is like” for the author than to say that his being was physically, psychologically, and relationally disordered. Despite his desires, he could not find a way to regain order and harmony within himself. It was only (...)
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  30.  49
    Han Fei Zi’s Philosophical Psychology: Human Nature, Scarcity, and the Neo-Darwinian Consensus.Owen Flanagan & Jing Hu - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (2):293-316.
  31.  97
    Addiction Doesn’t Exist, But it is Bad for You.Owen Flanagan - 2017 - Neuroethics 10 (1):91-98.
    There is a debate about the nature of addiction, whether it is a result of brain damage, brain dysfunction, or normal brain changes that result from habit acquisition, and about whether it is a disease. I argue that the debate about whether addiction is a disease is much ado about nothing, since all parties agree it is “unquestionably destructive.” Furthermore, the term ‘addiction’ has disappeared from recent DSM’s in favor of a spectrum of ‘abuse’ disorders. This may be a good (...)
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  32.  99
    Malfunction and Mental Illness.Brendan A. Maher, A. W. Young, Philip Gerrans, John Campbell, Kai Vogeley, Valerie Gray Hardcastle, Owen Flanagan, Robert L. Woolfolk, Barry Smith & Joëlle Proust - 1999 - The Monist 82 (4):658-670.
    For years a debate has raged within the various literatures of philosophy, psychiatry, and psychology over whether, and to what degree, the concepts that characterize psychopathology are social constructions that reflect cultural values. While the majority position among philosophers has been normativist, i.e., that the conception of a mental disorder is value-laden, a vocal and cogent minority have argued that psychopathology results from malfunctions that can be described by terminology that is objective and scientific. Scientists and clinicians have tended to (...)
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  33.  31
    Against the Drug Cure Model: Addiction, Identity, and Pharmaceuticals.Şerife Tekin, Owen Flanagan & George Graham - 2017 - In Dien Ho (ed.), Philosophical Issues in Pharmaceutics: Development, Dispensing, and Use. Dordrecht: Springer.
    Recent advances in brain imaging methods as well as increased sophistication in neuroscientific modeling of the brain’s reward systems have facilitated the study of neural mechanisms associated with addiction such as processes associated with motivation, decision-making, pleasure seeking, and inhibitory control. These scientific activities have increased optimism that the neurological underpinnings of addiction will be delineated, and that pharmaceuticals that target and change these mechanisms will by themselves facilitate early intervention and even full recovery. In this paper, we argue that (...)
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  34. Varieties of naturalism.Owen Flanagan - 2006 - In Philip Clayton & Zachory Simpson (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science. Oxford University Press. pp. 430--452.
    Accession Number: ATLA0001712242; Hosting Book Page Citation: p 430-452.; Language(s): English; General Note: Bibliography: p 451-452.; Issued by ATLA: 20130825; Publication Type: Essay.
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  35. The Science of Mind.Owen J. Flanagan - 1985 - Ethics 96 (1):195-197.
  36.  74
    Ethics naturalized: ethics as human ecology.Owen Flanagan - 1996 - In L. May, Michael Friedman & A. Clark (eds.), Mind and Morals: Essays on Ethics and Cognitive Science. MIT Press. pp. 19--44.
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  37. Neuroexistentialism: Third-Wave Existentialism.Gregg D. Caruso & Owen Flanagan - 2018 - In Gregg D. Caruso & Owen J. Flanagan (eds.), Neuroexistentialism: Meaning, Morals, and Purpose in the Age of Neuroscience. New York: Oxford University Press.
    Existentialism is a concern about the foundation of meaning, morals, and purpose. Existentialisms arise when some foundation for these elements of being is under assault. In the past, first-wave existentialism concerned the increasingly apparent inability of religion, and religious tradition, to provide such a foundation, as typified in the writings of Kierkegaard, Dostoevsky, and Nietzsche. Second-wave existentialism, personified philosophically by Sartre, Camus, and de Beauvoir, developed in response to the inability of an overly optimistic Enlightenment vision of reason and the (...)
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  38. Multiple identity, character transformation, and self-reclamation.Owen J. Flanagan - 1994 - In George Graham & G. Lynn Stephens (eds.), Philosophical Psychopathology. MIT Press.
  39. The Oneness Hypothesis: Beyond the Boundary of Self.Philip J. Ivanhoe, Owen Flanagan, Victoria S. Harrison, Hagop Sarkissian & Eric Schwitzgebel (eds.) - 2018 - New York, NY, USA: Columbia University Press.
    The idea that the self is inextricably intertwined with the rest of the world—the “oneness hypothesis”—can be found in many of the world’s philosophical and religious traditions. Oneness provides ways to imagine and achieve a more expansive conception of the self as fundamentally connected with other people, creatures, and things. Such views present profound challenges to Western hyperindividualism and its excessive concern with self-interest and tendency toward self-centered behavior. This anthology presents a wide-ranging, interdisciplinary exploration of the nature and implications (...)
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  40.  81
    Han Fei zi's philosophical psychology: Human nature, scarcity, and the neo-Darwinian consensus.Owen Flanagan & H. U. Jing - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (2):293-316.
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  41. Deconstructing dreams: The spandrels of sleep.Owen Flanagan - 1995 - Journal of Philosophy 92 (1):5-27.
  42.  36
    Deconstructing Dreams: The Spandrels of Sleep.Owen Flanagan - 1995 - Journal of Philosophy 92 (1):5-27.
  43.  29
    Self Expressions: Mind, Morals, and the Meaning of Life.P. S. Greenspan & Owen Flanagan - 1998 - Philosophical Review 107 (1):128.
    Owen Flanagan is a highly prolific writer and speaker whose work brings together results of research in several empirical disciplines overlapping with philosophy, particularly neuroscience and other areas of psychology. This book of thirteen essays, most of them revisions of work published elsewhere, exhibits both his intellectual and his stylistic range. Many of the essays are light and chatty, others analytical and slower-going.
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  44. Admirable immorality and admirable imperfection.Owen Flanagan - 1986 - Journal of Philosophy 83 (1):41-60.
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  45. Consciousness, adaptation, and epiphenomenalism.Owen J. Flanagan & Thomas W. Polger - 2002 - In James H. Fetzer (ed.), Consciousness Evolving. John Benjamins.
    Consciousness and evolution are complex phenomena. It is sometimes thought that if adaptation explanations for some varieties of consciousness, say, conscious visual perception, can be had, then we may be reassured that at least those kinds of consciousness are not epiphenomena. But what if other varieties of consciousness, for example, dreams, are not adaptations? We sort out the connections among evolution, adaptation, and epiphenomenalism in order to show that the consequences for the nature and causal efficacy of consciousness are not (...)
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  46.  58
    Quinean ethics.Owen J. Flanagan Jr - 1982 - Ethics 93 (1):56-74.
  47.  80
    Virtue, sex, and gender: Some philosophical reflections on the moral psychology debate.Owen J. Flanagan Jr - 1982 - Ethics 92 (3):499-512.
  48. Neuroexistentialism, Eudaimonics, and Positive Illusions.Timothy Lane & Owen Flanagan - forthcoming - In Byron Kaldis (ed.), Mind and Society: Cognitive Science Meets the Philosophy of the Social Sciences. SYNTHESE Philosophy Library Studies in Epistemology, Logic, Methodology, & Philosophy of Science. Springer Science+Business.
    There is a distinctive form of existential anxiety, neuroexistential anxiety, which derives from the way in which contemporary neuroscience provides copious amounts of evidence to underscore the Darwinian message—we are animals, nothing more. One response to this 21st century existentialism is to promote Eudaimonics, a version of ethical naturalism that is committed to promoting fruitful interaction between ethical inquiry and science, most notably psychology and neuroscience. We argue that philosophical reflection on human nature and social life reveals that while working (...)
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  49. The stream of consciousness.Owen J. Flanagan - 1992 - In Consciousness Reconsidered. MIT Press.
  50.  30
    Moral Science? Still Metaphysical After All These Years.Owen Flanagan - 2009 - In Darcia Narvaez & Daniel Lapsley (eds.), Personality, Identity, and Character. Cambridge University Press. pp. 52.
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