15 found
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  1. Just Plain "Ought''.Owen McLeod - 2001 - The Journal of Ethics 5 (4):269-291.
    Is there any sense to the idea of an ``ought''''that is not relative to any particularnormative framework? This ``ought'''' would not bea moral, prudential, legal, aesthetic, orreligious ``ought,'''' but rather an unqualified or just plain ``ought.'''' Thispaper (i) argues for the existence andusefulness of just plain ``ought''''; (ii) locatesthe concept of just plain ``ought'''' within amajor strand in the history of ethics (namely,the perennial attempt to demonstrate thatmorality and prudence are in harmony); and(iii) challenges David Copp''s recent attempt toshow that (...)
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  2.  56
    Desert.Owen McLeod - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  3. Desert and Wages.Owen McLeod - 1996 - Utilitas 8 (2):205-221.
    Women tend to earn less than their male colleagues. Furthermore, women tend to earn less than men who hold jobs that are nominally different but relevantly similar to their own. Advocates of ‘comparable worth’ protest these facts. Their protest sometimes takes this form: Those differences in pay between men and women are undeserved . The argument for this claim is simple. Some facts are relevant to the wage one deserves for performing a given job; some are not. In the vast (...)
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  4.  4
    2t. Desert and Institutions.Owen McLeod - 1999 - In Louis P. Pojman & Owen McLeod (eds.), What Do We Deserve?: A Reader on Justice and Desert. Oxford University Press. pp. 186.
  5.  92
    What is Sidgwick's Dualism of Practical Reason?Owen McLeod - 2000 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 81 (3):273–290.
    Sidgwick's ‘Dualism of Practical Reason’ has attracted the attention of many interpreters, and the Dualism itself seems to be an historically important version of the view, recently defended by Thomas Nagel, Susan Wolf, and others, that there exists a fundamental fragmentation of value – that the ‘cosmos of duty is reduced to chaos,’ in Sidgwick's words. In this paper, I consider and reject the leading interpretations of Sidgwick's Dualism, and propose an alternative reading. I conclude by offering what I hope (...)
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  6.  24
    What Do We Deserve?: A Reader on Justice and Desert.Louis P. Pojman & Owen McLeod (eds.) - 1998 - Oxford University Press.
    The concept of desert, which once enjoyed a central place in political and ethical theory, has been relegated to the margins of much of contemporary theory, if not excluded altogether. Recently a renewed interest in the topic has emerged, and several philosophers have argued that the notion merits a more central place in political and ethical theory. Some of these philosophers contend that justice exists to the extent that people receive exactly what they deserve, while others argue that desert should (...)
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  7.  2
    On the Comparative Element of Justice.Owen McLeod - 2003 - In Serena Olsaretti (ed.), Desert and Justice. Oxford University Press. pp. 123--123.
    Serena Olsaretti brings together new essays by leading moral and political philosophers on the nature of desert and justice, their relations with each other and with other values.
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  8. What do we deserve? A Reader on Justice and Desert.Louis P. Pojman & Owen Mcleod - 2001 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 191 (3):393-393.
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  9.  41
    Aristotle's Method.Owen McLeod - 1995 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 12 (1):1 - 18.
  10.  87
    Daniel N. Robinson, Praise and Blame: Moral Realism and its Applications (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2002), Pp. XII + 225.Owen Mcleod - 2005 - Utilitas 17 (2):236-238.
  11.  34
    Ethical Norms, Particular Cases. [REVIEW]Owen Mcleod - 1999 - Dialogue 38 (2):433-434.
    This book is part of the “particularist” trend in modern moral philosophy. But a casual reader might conclude that Wallace endorses a crude form of moral conventionalism—the view that one morally ought to do just what conventional morality demands. Consider some passages: “The proposal is to view morality as a body of practical knowledge, a social artifact that has resulted from what people have learned over time from their efforts to cope with certain practical problems encountered over the course of (...)
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  12.  65
    Is There a Moral Obligation to Obey God?Owen McLeod - 2000 - Philo 3 (1):20-31.
    A widespread view among theists is that there is a moral obligation to obey God’s commands. In this paper, four arguments for this view are considered: the argument from beneficence; the argument from property rights; the argument from justice; and the argument from omnipotence and moral perfection. It is argued that none of these arguments succeeds in showing that there is a moral obligation to obey God’s commands. The paper concludes with the suggestion that there might be, nevertheless, weighty and (...)
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  13.  50
    Justice as Fittingness. [REVIEW]Owen McLeod - 1998 - Law and Philosophy 17 (1):61-75.
  14.  84
    Science, Religion, and Hyper-Humeanism.Owen McLeod - 2001 - Philo 4 (1):68-81.
    According to hyper-Humeanism, the world of “fact” is utterly distinct from the realm of “value”-that is, the realm of morality and religion.This is a well-known philosophical position, and it more or less follows from some well-known philosophical doctrines (e.g., logical positivism, and neo-Wittgensteinianism), but its appeal is not limited to philosophers. Indeed, an acceptance of hyper-Humeanism seems to be at the root of Stephen Jay Gould’s recent defense of the thesis that science and religion are utterly distinct. Gould’s stated aim (...)
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  15. What Do We Deserve? A Reader on Justice and Desert.Louis P. Pojman & Owen Mcleod - 2000 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 62 (3):630-630.
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