Results for 'P. Anger'

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  1.  13
    Anger as “Seeing Red”: Evidence for a Perceptual Association.Adam K. Fetterman, Michael D. Robinson & Brian P. Meier - 2012 - Cognition and Emotion 26 (8):1445-1458.
  2.  16
    Not Far From the Kingdom: Martha Nussbaum on Anger and Forgiveness.Timothy P. Jackson - 2018 - Journal of Religious Ethics 46 (4):749-770.
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  3.  23
    Mellow Monday and Furious Friday: The Approach-Related Link Between Anger and Time Representation.David J. Hauser, Margaret S. Carter & Brian P. Meier - 2009 - Cognition and Emotion 23 (6):1166-1180.
    (2009). Mellow Monday and furious Friday: The approach-related link between anger and time representation. Cognition & Emotion: Vol. 23, No. 6, pp. 1166-1180.
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  4.  21
    Apollonian anger P. dräger: Die argonautika Des Apollonios rhodios. Das zweite Zorn-epos der griechischen literatur . Pp. VIII + 174. Munich and leipzig: K. G. saur, 2001. Cased, €80. Isbn: 3-598-77707-. [REVIEW]Marco Fantuzzi - 2004 - The Classical Review 54 (01):44-.
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  5. Graves, R., Tr., The Anger of Achilles.P. C. Wilson - 1959 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 53:157.
     
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  6.  8
    Counting to ten Milliseconds: Low-Anger, but Not High-Anger, Individuals Pause Following Negative Evaluations.Michael D. Robinson, Benjamin M. Wilkowski, Brian P. Meier, Sara K. Moeller & Adam K. Fetterman - 2012 - Cognition and Emotion 26 (2):261-281.
  7.  2
    Agathe SUEUR, Vie de Joachim Burmeister.Violaine Anger - forthcoming - Rhuthmos.
    Ce compte rendu a déjà paru sur le site de la revue Études. A. Sueur, Vie de Joachim Burmeister, Paris, Rhuthmos, 2019, 103 p. Joachim Burmeister est connu, dans toutes les histoires de la musique, comme celui qui, le premier, a proposé, autour de 1600, une analyse rhétorique des œuvres musicales : celles-ci ne sont plus désormais comprises comme de belles formes reproduisant la splendeur et l'unité des structures du monde, selon la grande approche médiévale, mais comme des discours - (...)
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  8.  23
    Search for Supersymmetry in Events with Large Missing Transverse Momentum, Jets, and at Least One Tau Lepton in 20 Fb−1of √s= 8 TeV Proton-Proton Collision Data with the ATLAS Detector. [REVIEW]A. The Atlas Collaboration, G. Aad, B. Abbott, Abdallah Jm, S. Abdel Khalek, Abdinov Ob, R. Aben, Abi Ba, Abolins Ma, Abouzeid Os, H. Abramowicz, H. Abreu, R. Abreu, Y. Abulaiti, Acharya Bs, L. Adamczyk, Adams Dl, J. Adelman, S. Adomeit, Adye Tj, T. Agatonovic-Jovin, Aguilar-Saavedra Ja, M. Agustoni, Ahlen Sp, F. Ahmadov, G. Aielli, Åkerstedt Ho, Åkesson Tpa, G. Akimoto, Akimov Av, Alberghi Gl, Albert Jb, S. Albrand, Alconada Verzini Mj, M. Aleksa, Aleksandrov In, C. Alexa, Alexander Gk, G. Alexandre, Alexopoulos Ta, M. Alhroob, G. Alimonti, L. Alio, Alison Jm, Allbrooke Bmm, Allison Lj, Allport Pp, Almond Je, A. Aloisio, A. Alonso, F. Alonso, C. Alpigiani, Altheimer Ad, B. Álvarez González, Alviggi Mg, K. Amako, Y. Amaral Coutinho, C. Amelung, D. Amidei, Amor Dos Santos Sp, Amorim As, S. Amoroso, N. Amram, G. Amundsen, C. Anastopoulos, Ancu Ls, N. Andari, Andeen Tr, Anders Cf, G. Anders, Anderson Kj, A. Andreazza, V. Andrei, Anduaga Xs, S. Angelidakis, I. Angelozzi, P. Anger, A. Angerami, F. Anghinolfi, Anisenkov Av, N. Anjos, A. Annovi, A. Antonaki, M. Antonelli & A. - unknown
    © 2014, The Author. A search for supersymmetry in events with large missing transverse momentum, jets, at least one hadronically decaying tau lepton and zero or one additional light leptons, has been performed using 20.3fb−1of proton-proton collision data at √ s= 8 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No excess above the Standard Model background expectation is observed in the various signal regions and 95% confidence level upper limits on the visible cross section for new (...)
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  9.  34
    Search for the Direct Production of Charginos, Neutralinos and Staus in Final States with at Least Two Hadronically Decaying Taus and Missing Transverse Momentum in Pp Collisions at √ $$ \Sqrt{s}=8 $$ TeV with the ATLAS Detector.The Atlasc, G. Aad, B. Abbott, J. Abdallah, Khalek Sa, O. Abdinov, R. Aben, B. Abi, M. Abolins, Abouzeid Os, H. Abramowicz, H. Abreu, R. Abreu, Y. Abulaiti, Acharya Bs, L. Adamczyk, Adams Dl, J. Adelman, S. Adomeit, T. Adye, T. Agatonovic-Jovin, Aguilar-Saavedra Ja, M. Agustoni, Ahlen Sp, F. Ahmadov, G. Aielli, H. Akerstedt, Åkesson Tpa, G. Akimoto, Akimov Av, Alberghi Gl, J. Albert, S. Albrand, Alconada Verzini Mj, M. Aleksa, Aleksandrov In, C. Alexa, G. Alexander, G. Alexandre, T. Alexopoulos, M. Alhroob, G. Alimonti, L. Alio, J. Alison, Allbrooke Bmm, Allison Lj, Allport Pp, J. Almond, A. Aloisio, A. Alonso, F. Alonso, C. Alpigiani, A. Altheimer, Gonzalez Ba, Alviggi Mg, K. Amako, Y. Amaral Coutinho, C. Amelung, D. Amidei, Amor Dos Santos Sp, A. Amorim, S. Amoroso, N. Amram, G. Amundsen, C. Anastopoulos, Ancu Ls, N. Andari, T. Andeen, Anders Cf, G. Anders, Anderson Kj, A. Andreazza, V. Andrei, Anduaga Xs, S. Angelidakis, I. Angelozzi, P. Anger, A. Angerami, F. Anghinolfi, Anisenkov Av, N. Anjos, A. Annovi, A. Antonaki, M. Antonelli, A. Antonov, J. Antos, F. Anulli & A. - unknown
    : Results of a search for the electroweak associated production of charginos and next-to-lightest neutralinos, pairs of charginos or pairs of tau sleptons are presented. These processes are characterised by final states with at least two hadronically decaying tau leptons, missing transverse momentum and low jet activity. The analysis is based on an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb−1 of proton-proton collisions at recorded with the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. No significant excess is observed with respect to the (...)
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  10.  59
    About Behaviourism.P. Ziff - 1957 - Analysis 18 (June):132-6.
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  11.  53
    ""The Psychopathology of" Sex Reassignment" Surgery: Assessing Its Medical, Psychological, and Ethical Appropriateness.Richard P. Fitzgibbons, Philip M. Sutton & Dale O'Leary - 2009 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 9 (1):97-125.
    Is it ethical to perform a surgery whose purpose is to make a male look like a female or a female to appear male? Is it medically appropriate? Sexual reassignment surgery violates basic medical and ethical principles and is therefore not ethically or medically appropriate. SRS mutilates a healthy, non-diseased body. To perform surgery on a healthy body involves unnecessary risks; therefore, SRS violates the principle primum non nocere, “first, do no harm.” Candidates for SRS may believe that they are (...)
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  12.  39
    Nietzsche and Gadamer: From Strife to Understanding, Achilles/Agamemnon to Achilles/Priam. [REVIEW]P. Christopher Smith - 2002 - Continental Philosophy Review 35 (4):379-396.
    Nietzsche penetrates behind any rational discussion to its affective ground, but though he goes deeper than Gadamer's fusion of horizons, he nevertheless fails to acknowledge any other affective disposition besides the will to power. Hence for him Gadamer's Sichverständigung, or reaching an understanding, is fiction. In contrast, Gadamer's Zugehörigkeit, a sense of kinship, and Nachlassen, relenting, suggest not only the possibility of reaching an understanding but its real, affective ground. Two passages from Homer's Iliad illustrate how Nietzsche might penetrate behind (...)
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  13. Negotiating Hegemonic Masculinity in a Batterer Intervention Program.Irene Padavic & Douglas P. Schrock - 2007 - Gender and Society 21 (5):625-649.
    Domestic violence represents a crucial underpinning of women's continued subordination, which is why much scholarly and activist energy has been expended in designing, implementing, and evaluating programs to reduce it. On the basis of three years of fieldwork, the authors analyze the interactional processes through which masculinity was constructed in one such program. They find that facilitators had success in getting the men to agree to take responsibility, use egalitarian language, control anger, and choose nonviolence, but the men were (...)
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  14. Revisiting BISFT Summer School 2004, University of Bristol, ‘Embracing Diversity: Seeking Harmony’.Carol P. Christ - 2019 - Feminist Theology 27 (3):311-328.
    The article presents a dialogue between Carol P. Christ and Judith Plaskow. It argues that a process metaphysic provides an alternative to the Christian liberation paradigm and could help feminists in religion to articulate alternatives to the concept of God as a dominant male other found in classical theism. A shared metaphysic could help feminists in different religious traditions to recognize common concerns and commitments, to guard against claims of uniqueness and exclusivity of religious traditions, and to engage with the (...)
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  15.  18
    New York Film Festival 2001.Martha P. Nochimson - 2001 - Film-Philosophy 5 (1).
    The New York Film Festival 2001 took place against a background of the horror and beauty, fear and hope, anger and love released into the air along with noxious columns of smoking dust and ash by the attack on the World Trade Center on September 11 by a group of terrorists. It was an inauspicious time to ask people to travel anywhere by air, and certainly to New York City. But, oddly, the festival was not marked by a sense (...)
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  16. Response-Dependent Responsibility; or, A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to Blame.David Shoemaker - 2017 - Philosophical Review 126 (4):481-527.
    This essay attempts to provide and defend what may be the first actual argument in support of P. F. Strawson's merely stated vision of a response-dependent theory of moral responsibility. It does so by way of an extended analogy with the funny. In part 1, it makes the easier and less controversial case for response-dependence about the funny. In part 2, it shows the tight analogy between anger and amusement in developing the harder and more controversial case for response-dependence (...)
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  17.  53
    Focusing Forgiveness.András Szigeti - 2014 - Journal of Value Inquiry 48 (2):217-234.
    IntroductionIt is clear that forgiveness is closely related to emotions. Bishop Butler’s “forswearing of resentment” is still the definition most philosophical works on the subject take as their point of departure. Some others disagree but usually only insofar as they focus on another reactive emotion – e.g., moral hatred, disappointment, anger – which we overcome when we forgive.More specifically, according to Roberts the emotion we overcome in forgiveness is anger, see Robert C. Roberts, “Forgivingness,” American Philosophical Quarterly 32 (...)
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  18.  69
    Core Affect and Natural Affective Kinds.Andrea Scarantino - 2009 - Philosophy of Science 76 (5):940-957.
    It is commonly assumed that the scientific study of emotions should focus on discrete categories such as fear, anger, sadness, joy, disgust, shame, guilt, and so on. This view has recently been questioned by the emergence of the “core affect movement,” according to which discrete emotions are not natural kinds. Affective science, it is argued, should focus on core affect, a blend of hedonic and arousal values. Here, I argue that the empirical evidence does not support the thesis that (...)
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  19. Emotions, Moods, and Intentionality.William Fish - 2005 - In Intentionality: Past and Future (Value Inquiry Book Series, Volume 173). Rodopi NY.
    Under the general heading of what we might loosely call emotional states, a familiar distinction can be drawn between emotions (strictly so-called) and moods. In order to judge under which of these headings a subject’s emotional episode falls, we advance a question of the form: What is the subject’s emotion of or about? In some cases (for example fear, sadness, and anger) the provision of an answer is straightforward: the subject is afraid of the loose tiger, or sad about (...)
     
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  20.  11
    Emotion and the Concept of Behavior.Moreland Perkins - 1966 - American Philosophical Quarterly 3 (4):291-298.
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  21.  51
    Freedom, Resentment, and the Psychopath.Piers Benn - 1999 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 6 (1):29-39.
    This paper discusses the moral responsibility of psychopaths for their anti-social actions. Starting from P. F. Strawson's discussion of our participant reactive attitudes, which stresses their indispensability for meaningful human relations, the paper contrasts a variety of "normal" wrongdoers with psychopaths. It suggests that the latter are often seriously deficient in their capacity to entertain these attitudes, and that their resulting lack of proper self-evaluation may explain both their callousness and their imprudence. It is then argued that only creatures able (...)
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  22. Anger and Forgiveness: Resentment, Generosity, Justice.Martha C. Nussbaum - 2016 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    In this volume based on her 2014 Locke Lectures, Martha C. Nussbaum provides a bracing new view that strips the notion of forgiveness down to its Judeo-Christian roots, where it was structured by the moral relationship between a score-keeping God and penitent, self-abasing, and erring mortals.
     
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  23. "On Anger, Silence and Epistemic Injustice".Alison Bailey - 2018 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 84:93-115.
    Abstract: If anger is the emotion of injustice, and if most injustices have prominent epistemic dimensions, then where is the anger in epistemic injustice? Despite the question my task is not to account for the lack of attention to anger in epistemic injustice discussions. Instead, I argue that a particular texture of transformative anger – a knowing resistant anger – offers marginalized knowers a powerful resource for countering epistemic injustice. I begin by making visible the (...)
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  24. Love, Anger, and Racial Injustice.Myisha Cherry - 2019 - In Adrienne Martin (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Love in Philosophy. New York: Routledge.
    Luminaries like Martin Luther King, Jr. urge that Black Americans love even those who hate them. This can look like a rejection of anger at racial injustice. We see this rejection, too, in the growing trend of characterizing social justice movements as radical hate groups, and people who get angry at injustice as bitter and unloving. Philosophers like Martha Nussbaum argue that anger is backward-looking, status focused, and retributive. Citing the life of the Prodigal Son, the victims of (...)
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  25. Valuing Anger.Antti Kauppinen - 2018 - In Myisha Cherry & Owen Flanagan (eds.), The Moral Psychology of Anger. Rowman & Littlefield.
    It is widely acknowledged that susceptibility to suitable emotional responses is part of what it is to value something. Indeed, the value of at least some things calls for such emotional responses – if we lack them, we don’t respond appropriately to their value. In this paper, I argue that susceptibility to anger is an essential component of valuing other people, ourselves, and our relationships. The main reason is that various modes of valuing, such as respect, self-respect, and love, (...)
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  26. Arrogance, Anger and Debate.Alessandra Tanesini - 2018 - Symposion: Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences 5 (2):213-227.
    Arrogance has widespread negative consequences for epistemic practices. Arrogant people tend to intimidate and humiliate other agents, and to ignore or dismiss their views. They have a propensity to mansplain. They are also angry. In this paper I explain why anger is a common manifestation of arrogance in order to understand the effects of arrogance on debate. I argue that superbia is a vice of superiority characterised by an overwhelming desire to diminish other people in order to excel and (...)
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  27.  66
    Anger and Morality.Benoît Dubreuil - 2015 - Topoi 34 (2):475-482.
    The emotion of anger has a long love–hate relationship with morality. On the one hand, anger often motivates us to sanction wrongdoing and uphold demanding moral standards. On the other hand, it can prompt aggression behaviors that are at odds with morality and even lead to moral disasters. This article describes this complex relationship. I argue that the intensity of anger elicited by moral transgressions is highly sensitive to key variables, including the identity of the person wronged, (...)
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  28. Transitional Anger.Martha C. Nussbaum - 2015 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 1 (1):41--56.
    ABSTRACT ABSTRACT: A close philosophical analysis of the emotion of anger will show that it is normatively irrational: in some cases, based on futile magical thinking, in others, based on defective values.
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  29.  57
    Anger and Its Cousins.Maria Miceli & Cristiano Castelfranchi - 2019 - Emotion Review 11 (1):13-26.
    The widespread assumption that anger is a response to wrongdoing and motivates people to sanction it, as well as the lack of distinction between resentment and indignation, obscure notable differences among these three emotions in terms of their specific beliefs, goals, and action tendencies, their nonmoral or moral character, and the kinds of moral claim implied. We provide a cognitive-motivational analysis of anger, resentment, and indignation, showing that, while sharing a common core, they are distinguishable from one another (...)
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  30.  17
    Anger and Prosocial Behavior.Janne van Doorn, Marcel Zeelenberg & Seger M. Breugelmans - 2014 - Emotion Review 6 (3):261-268.
    Anger is often primarily portrayed as a negative emotion that motivates antagonistic, aggressive, punitive, or hostile behavior. We propose that this portrayal is too one-sided. A review of the literature on behavioral consequences of anger reveals evidence for the positive and even prosocial behavioral consequences of this emotion. We outline a more inclusive view of anger and its role in upholding cooperative and moral behavior, and suggest a possible role of equity concerns. We also suggest new predictions (...)
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  31.  12
    Anger and Hostility: Are They Different? An Analytical Exploration of Facial-Expressive Differences, and Physiological and Facial-Emotional Responses.Myron Tsikandilakis, Persefoni Bali, Jan Derrfuss & Peter Chapman - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 34 (3):581-595.
    Previous research has proposed the exploratory hypotheses that hostility could differ from anger in the sense that it involves higher possibility for inflicting physical harm while anger could invo...
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  32.  7
    Anger Strays, Fear Refrains: The Differential Effect of Negative Emotions on Consumers’ Ethical Judgments.Jatinder J. Singh, Nitika Garg, Rahul Govind & Scott J. Vitell - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 151 (1):235-248.
    Although various factors have been studied for their influence on consumers’ ethical judgments, the role of incidental emotions has received relatively less attention. Recent research in consumer behavior has focused on studying the effect of specific incidental emotions on various aspects of consumer decision making. This paper investigates the effect of two negative, incidental emotional states of anger and fear on ethical judgment in a consumer context using a passive unethical behavior scenario. The paper presents two experimental studies. Study (...)
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  33. Teaching & Learning Guide For: Contemporary Virtue Ethics.Karen Stohr - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (1):102-107.
    Virtue ethics is now well established as a substantive, independent normative theory. It was not always so. The revival of virtue ethics was initially spurred by influential criticisms of other normative theories, especially those made by Elizabeth Anscombe, Philippa Foot, John McDowell, Alasdair MacIntyre, and Bernard Williams. 1 Because of this heritage, virtue ethics is often associated with anti-theory movements in ethics and more recently, moral particularism. There are, however, quite a few different approaches to ethics that can reasonably claim (...)
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  34.  67
    Liberating Anger, Embodying Knowledge: A Comparative Study of María Lugones and Zen Master Hakuin.Jen McWeeny - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (2):295 - 315.
    This paper strengthens the theoretical ground of feminist analyses of anger by explaining how the angers of the oppressed are ways of knowing. Relying on insights created through the juxtaposition of Latina feminism and Zen Buddhism, I argue that these angers are special kinds of embodied perceptions that surface when there is a profound lack of fit between a particular bodily orientation and its framing world of sense. As openings to alternative sensibilities, these angers are transformative, liberatory, and deeply (...)
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  35.  73
    Anger as a Political Emotion: A Phenomenological Perspective.Celine Leboeuf - 2017 - In Myisha Cherry & Owen Flanagan (eds.), The Moral Psychology of Anger. pp. 15-30.
    My essay discusses the politics of anger from a phenomenological perspective. Philosophers such as Martha Nussbaum have examined the importance of emotions for achieving social justice. In Anger and Forgiveness, Nussbaum criticizes most forms of anger for including the desire to retaliate, but identifies a species of anger, “Transition-Anger,” which can motivate us to respond to wrongdoing. In a similar vein, I claim that anger can help the oppressed respond to their oppression. To defend (...)
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  36. Anger and Indignation.John J. Drummond - 2017 - In John J. Drummond & Sonja Rinofner-Kreidl (eds.), Emotional Experiences: Ethical and Social Significance. London and New York: Rowman & Littlefield.
  37.  18
    The Dependence of Interresponse Times Upon the Relative Reinforcement of Different Interresponse Times.Douglas Anger - 1956 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 52 (3):145.
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  38.  45
    The Poetics of Mind. [REVIEW]James Edwin Mahon - 1996 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 4:202-203.
    Review of Gibbs' book in which he argues against the twin assumptions that language is inherently literal, and that thought itself is literal. Metaphors, etc., are omnipresent in language, Gibbs argues, and the mind is inherently 'poetic', i.e., it engages in figurative thinking. For example, we conceptualize anger as "ANGER IS HEATED FLUID IN A CONTAINER" (p. 7), and as a result, that is how we talk about anger ('Bill is getting hot under the collar,' 'She blew (...)
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  39.  15
    Innovation, Choice, and the History of Music.Leonard B. Meyer - 1983 - Critical Inquiry 9 (3):517-544.
    Before going further, it will be helpful to consider briefly the notion that novelty per se is a fundamental human need. Experiments with human beings, as well as with animals, indicate that the maintenance of normal, successful behavior depends upon an adequate level of incoming stimulation—or, as some have put it, of novelty.2 But lumping all novelty together is misleading. At least three kinds of novelty need to be distinguished. Some novel patterns arise out of, or represent, changes in the (...)
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  40.  40
    Review of Gabriele Taylor, Deadly Vices[REVIEW]Christian Miller - 2007 - Journal of Value Inquiry 41:409-413.
    Much attention in the recent resurgence of interest in virtue ethics has been paid to the virtues. At the same time, however, comparatively little has been written about vices. In Deadly Vices, Gabriele Taylor aims to remedy this by offering a detailed discussion of the vices that are traditionally labeled the seven deadly sins: sloth, envy, avarice, pride, anger, lust, and gluttony. Among her central claims about them is that they are each focused primarily on the self, and that (...)
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  41. Great Anger.Anthony Cunningham - 2005 - The Dalhousie Review 85 (3).
    Anger has an undeniable hand in human suffering and horrific deeds. Various schools of thought call for eliminating or moderating the capacity for anger. I argue that the capacity for anger, like the capacity for grief, is at the heart of our humanity.
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  42.  24
    Anger, Feelings of Revenge, and Hate.Janne van Doorn - 2018 - Emotion Review 10 (4):321-322.
    In the current comment, I discuss what is unique about hate in relation to anger and feelings of revenge. It seems that hate can be distinguished from the related emotions anger and feelings of revenge by a difference in focus: Anger focuses on changing/restoring the unjust situation caused by another person, feelings of revenge focus on restoring the self, and hatred focuses on eliminating the hated person/group. Though grounded in existing literature, future research is needed to empirically (...)
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  43.  11
    Arrogance, Anger and Debate.Alessandra Tanesini - 2018 - Symposion. Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences.
    Alessandra Tanesini ABSTRACT: Arrogance has widespread negative consequences for epistemic practices. Arrogant people tend to intimidate and humiliate other agents, and to ignore or dismiss their views. They have a propensity to mansplain. They are also angry. In this paper I explain why anger is a common manifestation of arrogance in order to understand the...
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  44.  3
    Anger Stinks in Seri: Olfactory Metaphor in a Lesser-Described Language.Asifa Majid & Carolyn O’Meara - 2020 - Cognitive Linguistics 31 (3):367-391.
    Previous studies claim there are few olfactory metaphors cross-linguistically, especially compared to metaphors originating in the visual and auditory domains. We show olfaction can be a source for metaphor and metonymy in a lesser-described language that has rich lexical resources for talking about odors. In Seri, an isolate language of Mexico spoken by indigenous hunter-gatherers, we find a novel metaphor for emotion never previously described – “anger stinks”. In addition, distinct odor verbs are used metaphorically to distinguish volitional vs. (...)
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  45. Virtuous and Vicious Anger.Bommarito Nicolas - 2017 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 11 (3):1-28.
    I defend an account of when and why anger is morally virtuous or vicious. Anger often manifests what we care about; a sports fan gets angry when her favorite team loses because she cares about the team doing well. Anger, I argue, is made morally virtuous or vicious by the underlying care or concern. Anger is virtuous when it manifests moral concern and vicious when it manifests moral indifference or ill will. In defending this view, I (...)
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  46.  52
    Metabolizing Anger: A Tantric Buddhist Solution to the Problem of Moral Anger.Emily McRae - 2015 - Philosophy East and West 65 (2):466-484.
  47.  99
    Distance, Anger, Freedom: An Account of the Role of Abstraction in Compatibilist and Incompatibilist Intuitions.Chris Weigel - 2011 - Philosophical Psychology 24 (6):803 - 823.
    Experimental philosophers have disagreed about whether "the folk" are intuitively incompatibilists or compatibilists, and they have disagreed about the role of abstraction in generating such intuitions. New experimental evidence using Construal Level Theory is presented. The experiments support the views that the folk are intuitively both incompatibilists and compatibilists, and that abstract mental representations do shift intuitions, but not in a univocal way.
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  48.  49
    Anger and the Virtues: A Critical Study in Virtue Individuation.Ryan West - 2016 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 46 (6):877-897.
    Aristotle and others suggest that a single virtue – ‘good temper’ – pertains specifically to anger. I argue that if good temper is a single virtue, it is constituted by aspects of a combination of other virtues. I present three categories of anger-relevant virtues – those that dispose one to anger; those that delay, mitigate, and qualify anger; and those required for effortful anger control – and show how virtues in each category make distinct contributions (...)
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  49.  8
    Cosmopolitan Anger and Shame.Joshua Hobbs - 2019 - Journal of Global Ethics 16 (1):58-76.
    Sentimental cosmopolitans argue that cultivating empathy for distant others is necessary in order to motivate action to address global injustices. This paper accepts the basic premises of the senti...
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  50.  45
    Anger, Coping, and Frontal Cortical Activity: The Effect of Coping Potential on Anger-Induced Left Frontal Activity.Eddie Harmon-Jones, Jonathan Sigelman, Amanda Bohlig & Cindy Harmon-Jones - 2003 - Cognition and Emotion 17 (1):1-24.
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