26 found
Order:
  1. Moral injury in healthcare professionals: A scoping review and discussion.Anto Čartolovni, Minna Stolt, P. Anne Scott & Riitta Suhonen - 2021 - Nursing Ethics 28 (5):590-602.
    Moral injury emerged in the healthcare discussion quite recently because of the difficulties and challenges healthcare workers and healthcare systems face in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. Moral injury involves a deep emotional wound and is unique to those who bear witness to intense human suffering and cruelty. This article aims to synthesise the very limited evidence from empirical studies on moral injury and to discuss a better understanding of the concept of moral injury, its importance in the healthcare (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  2.  83
    Resource allocation and rationing in nursing care: A discussion paper.P. Anne Scott, Clare Harvey, Heike Felzmann, Riitta Suhonen, Monika Habermann, Kristin Halvorsen, Karin Christiansen, Luisa Toffoli & Evridiki Papastavrou - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (5):1528-1539.
    Driven by interests in workforce planning and patient safety, a growing body of literature has begun to identify the reality and the prevalence of missed nursing care, also specified as care left undone, rationed care or unfinished care. Empirical studies and conceptual considerations have focused on structural issues such as staffing, as well as on outcome issues – missed care/unfinished care. Philosophical and ethical aspects of unfinished care are largely unexplored. Thus, while internationally studies highlight instances of covert rationing/missed care/care (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  3.  39
    Emotion, moral perception, and nursing practice.P. Anne Scott - 2000 - Nursing Philosophy 1 (2):123-133.
    Many of the activities of clinical practice happen to, with or upon vulnerable human beings. For this reason numerous nursing authors draw attention to or claim a significant moral domain in clinical practice. A number of nursing authors also discuss the emotional involvement and/or emotional labour which is often experienced in clinical practice. In this article I explore the importance of emotion for moral perception and moral agency. I suggest that an aspect of being a good nurse is having an (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  4.  11
    Analysis of graduating nursing students’ moral courage in six European countries.Sanna Koskinen, Elina Pajakoski, Pilar Fuster, Brynja Ingadottir, Eliisa Löyttyniemi, Olivia Numminen, Leena Salminen, P. Anne Scott, Juliane Stubner, Marija Truš, Helena Leino-Kilpi & on Behalf of Procompnurse Consortium - 2021 - Nursing Ethics 28 (4):481-497.
    Background:Moral courage is defined as courage to act according to one’s own ethical values and principles even at the risk of negative consequences for the individual. In a complex nursing practice, ethical considerations are integral. Moral courage is needed throughout nurses’ career.Aim:To analyse graduating nursing students’ moral courage and the factors associated with it in six European countries.Research design:A cross-sectional design, using a structured questionnaire, as part of a larger international ProCompNurse study. In the questionnaire, moral courage was assessed with (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  5.  49
    Diagnostic self-testing: Autonomous choices and relational responsibilities.Alan J. Kearns, Dónal P. O'mathúna & P. Anne Scott - 2009 - Bioethics 24 (4):199-207.
    Diagnostic self-testing devices are being developed for many illnesses, chronic diseases and infections. These will be used in hospitals, at point-of-care facilities and at home. Designed to allow earlier detection of diseases, self-testing diagnostic devices may improve disease prevention, slow the progression of disease and facilitate better treatment outcomes. These devices have the potential to benefit both the individual and society by enabling individuals to take a more proactive role in the maintenance of their health and by helping society improve (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  6.  71
    Patient autonomy and choice in healthcare: self-testing devices as a case in point.Anna-Marie Greaney, Dónal P. O’Mathúna & P. Anne Scott - 2012 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (4):383-395.
    This paper aims to critique the phenomenon of advanced patient autonomy and choice in healthcare within the specific context of self-testing devices. A growing number of self-testing medical devices are currently available for home use. The premise underpinning many of these devices is that they assist individuals to be more autonomous in the assessment and management of their health. Increased patient autonomy is assumed to be a good thing. We take issue with this assumption and argue that self-testing provides a (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  7.  29
    Perceptions of Autonomy, Privacy and Informed Consent in the Care of Elderly People in Five European Countries: comparison and implications for the future.Helena Leino-Kilpi, Maritta Välimäki, Theo Dassen, Maria Gasull, Chryssoula Lemonidou, P. Anne Scott, Anja Schopp, Marianne Arndt & Anne Kaljonen - 2003 - Nursing Ethics 10 (1):58-66.
    This article discusses nurses’ and elderly patients’ perceptions of the realization of autonomy, privacy and informed consent in five European countries. Comparisons between the concepts and the countries indicated that both nurses and patients gave the highest ratings to privacy and the lowest to informed consent. There were differences between countries. According to the patient data, autonomy is best realized in Spain, privacy in the UK (Scotland), and informed consent in Finland. For the staff data, the best results tended to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  8.  32
    Perceptions of Autonomy in the Care of Elderly People in Five European Countries.P. Anne Scott, Maritta Välimäki, Helena Leino-Kilpi, Theo Dassen, Maria Gasull, Chryssoula Lemonidou, Marianne Arndt, Anja Schopp, Riitta Suhonen & Anne Kaljonen - 2003 - Nursing Ethics 10 (1):28-38.
    The focus of this article is perceptions of elderly patients and nurses regarding patients’ autonomy in nursing practice. Autonomy is empirically defined as having two components: information received/given as a prerequisite and decision making as the action. The results indicated differences between staff and patient perceptions of patient autonomy for both components in all five countries in which this survey was conducted. There were also differences between countries in the perceptions of patients and nurses regarding the frequency with which patients (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  9.  31
    Perceiving the moral dimension of practice: insights from Murdoch, Vetlesen, and Aristotle.P. Anne Scott - 2006 - Nursing Philosophy 7 (3):137-145.
    This paper situates the moral domain of practice within the context of a particular description of nursing practice – one that sees human interaction at the heart of that practice. Such a description fits not only with professional rhetoric but also with literature from patients and recent empirical work exploring the nature of nursing practice.Martha Levine in her 1977 description of ethics, within the context of nursing practice, indicated that what was important from an ethical perspective was how we interact (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  10.  22
    Ethics Education and Nursing Practice.P. Anne Scott - 1996 - Nursing Ethics 3 (1):53-63.
    This paper suggests that a consideration of health care practice is a necessary step in gaining insight into the appropriate composition of an ethics course for students in the health care professional. Health care practice, if it responds to the needs of society, is dynamic in nature. In the current climate of change in the health service, the author sug gests that the nursing profession needs to become more proactive in analysing and attempting to determine the future shape of nursing. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  11.  32
    Perceptions of Privacy in the Care of Elderly People in Five European Countries.Anja Schopp, Helena Leino-Kilpi, Maritta Välimäki, Theo Dassen, Maria Gasull, Chryssoula Lemonidou, P. Anne Scott, Marianne Arndt & Anne Kaljonen - 2003 - Nursing Ethics 10 (1):39-47.
    The focus of this article is on elderly patients’ and nursing staff perceptions of privacy in the care of elderly patients/residents in five European countries. Privacy includes physical, social and informational elements. The results show that perceptions of privacy were strongest in the UK (Scotland) and weakest in Greece. Country comparisons revealed statistically significant differences between the perceptions of elderly patients and also between those of nurses working in the same ward or long-term care facility. Perceptions of privacy by patients (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  12.  47
    Aristotle, Nursing and Health Care Ethics.P. Anne Scott - 1995 - Nursing Ethics 2 (4):279-285.
    Even a brief consideration of the nature of nursing will indicate that an ethical dimension underlies much, if not all, of nursing practice. It is therefore important that students and practitioners are facilitated in developing an ethical awareness and sensitivity from early in their professional development. This paper argues that Aristotelian virtue theory provides a practice-based focus for health care ethics for a number of reasons. Also, because of his emphasis on the character of the moral agent, and on the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  13.  17
    Modes of rationality in nursing documentation: biology, biography and the 'voice of nursing'.Abbey Hyde, Margaret Treacy, P. Anne Scott, Michelle Butler, Jonathan Drennan, Kate Irving, Anne Byrne, Padraig MacNeela & Marian Hanrahan - 2005 - Nursing Inquiry 12 (2):66-77.
    Modes of rationality in nursing documentation: biology, biography, and the ‘voice of nursing’ This article is based on a discourse analysis of the complete nursing records of 45 patients, and concerns the modes of rationality that mediated text‐based accounts relating to patient care that nurses recorded. The analysis draws on the work of the critical theorist, Jürgen Habermas, who conceptualised rationality in the context of modernity according to two types: purposive rationality based on an instrumental logic, and value rationality based (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  14.  28
    Perceptions of Informed Consent in the Care of Elderly People in Five European Countries.Anja Schopp, Maritta Välimäki, Helena Leino-Kilpi, Theo Dassen, Maria Gasull, Chryssoula Lemonidou, P. Anne Scott, Marianne Arndt & Anne Kaljonen - 2003 - Nursing Ethics 10 (1):48-57.
    The focus of this article is on elderly patients’ and nursing staff perceptions of informed consent in the care of elderly patients/residents in five European countries. The results suggest that patients and nurses differ in their views on how informed consent is implemented. Among elderly patients the highest frequency for securing informed consent was reported in Finland; the lowest was in Germany. In contrast, among nurses, the highest frequency was reported in the UK (Scotland) and the lowest in Finland. In (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  15.  29
    Perceptions of Autonomy, Privacy and Informed Consent in the Care of Elderly People in Five European Countries: general overview.Helena Leino-Kilpi, Maritta Välimäki, Theo Dassen, Maria Gasull, Chryssoula Lemonidou, Anja Schopp, P. Anne Scott, Marianne Arndt & Anne Kaljonen - 2003 - Nursing Ethics 10 (1):18-27.
    Ethical issues in the care of elderly people have been identified in many countries. We report the findings of a comparative research project funded by the European Commission, which took place between 1998 and 2001. The project explored the issues of autonomy (part I), privacy (part II) and informed consent (part III) in nursing practice. Data were collected from elderly residents/patients (n = 573) and nursing staff (n = 887) in five European countries: Finland, Spain, Greece, Germany and the UK (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  16.  14
    Professional Ethics: are we on the wrong track?P. Anne Scott - 1998 - Nursing Ethics 5 (6):477-485.
    Are we on the wrong track, in terms of our expectations of a code of practice, professional ethics teaching or the wider field of moral philosophy, in our search for clear answers to the ethical problems that arise in clinical practice; or are we simply wrong in believing that there are always clear answers?This article examines a particular case, an account of which appeared in Nursing Standard at the end of 1996. The conclusion reached is that we are likely to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  17.  80
    What is nursing in the 21st century and what does the 21st century health system require of nursing?P. Anne Scott, Anne Matthews & Marcia Kirwan - 2014 - Nursing Philosophy 15 (1):23-34.
    It is frequently claimed that nursing is vital to the safe, humane provision of health care and health service to our populations. It is also recognized however, that nursing is a costly health care resource that must be used effectively and efficiently. There is a growing recognition, from within the nursing profession, health care policy makers and society, of the need to analyse the contribution of nursing to health care and its costs. This becomes increasingly pertinent and urgent in a (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  18.  28
    What Makes a Good Nurse: Why the Virtues Are Important for Nurses.P. Anne Scott - 2013 - Nursing Philosophy 14 (1):70-73.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  19.  13
    Nursing minimum data sets: a conceptual analysis and review.Padraig Mac Neela, P. Anne Scott, Margaret P. Treacy & Abbey Hyde - 2006 - Nursing Inquiry 13 (1):44-51.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  21
    Perspectives on midwifery power: an exploration of the findings of the Inquiry into peripartum hysterectomy at Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital, Drogheda, Ireland.Anne Matthews & P. Anne Scott - 2008 - Nursing Inquiry 15 (2):127-134.
    The Lourdes Hospital Inquiry: An inquiry into peripartum hysterectomy at Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital, Drogheda, Ireland, of 2006 recounts in detail the circumstances within which 188 peripartum hysterectomies were carried out at the hospital between 1974 and 1998. The findings of the inquiry have serious ramifications for Irish healthcare delivery and have implications for many professional groups, including midwives. The findings prompt clear questions about the relative position or power of midwives within maternity care. These questions are examined in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  21.  30
    Autonomy, Power, and Control in Palliative Care.P. Anne Scott - 1999 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (2):139-147.
    A review of the literature on palliative care in the United Kingdom over the last fifteen years suggests that elements such as the development of the modern hospice, on the model developed by Cicely Saunders, have led to major improvements in the lot of the terminally ill.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  22.  21
    Do We Still Need Doctors?P. Anne Scott - 2001 - Nursing Philosophy 2 (1):90-91.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  26
    Niven and Scott (2003): Sixteen years of hindsight.P. Anne Scott - 2019 - Nursing Philosophy 20 (3):e12250.
    This paper revisits a 2003 publication in Nursing Philosophy: The need for accurate perception and informed judgement in determining the appropriate use of the nursing resource: hearing the patient's voice. The author suggests that the basic ideas and focus of this 16‐year‐old paper are still topical and relevant in considerations of nursing care. However, it is also suggested that greater attention to the importance of the nurse–patient relationship in considerations of resource allocation, and potential rationing of nursing care, would have (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  14
    Professional Ethics: are we on the wrong track?P. Anne Scott - 1998 - Nursing Ethics 5 (6):477-496.
    Are we on the wrong track, in terms of our expectations of a code of practice, professional ethics teaching or the wider field of moral philosophy, in our search for clear answers to the ethical problems that arise in clinical practice; or are we simply wrong in believing that there are always clear answers? This article examines a particular case, an account of which appeared in Nursing Standard at the end of 1996. The conclusion reached is that we are likely (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25.  16
    Understanding ethical failures in leadership.P. Anne Scott - 2007 - Nursing Philosophy 8 (2):144–146.
  26.  8
    Book Review: Informed consent in medical research. [REVIEW]P. Anne Scott - 2002 - Nursing Ethics 9 (4):452-453.