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  1.  84
    Scientific Change: Philosophical Models and Historical Research.Larry Laudan, Arthur Donovan, Rachel Laudan, Peter Barker, Harold Brown, Jarrett Leplin, Paul Thagard & Steve Wykstra - 1986 - Synthese 69 (2):141 - 223.
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  2.  24
    Kuhn on Concepts and Categorization.Peter Barker, Xiang Chen & Hanne Andersen - 2003 - In Thomas Nickles (ed.), Thomas Kuhn. Cambridge University Press. pp. 212--245.
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  3. Kuhn's Mature Philosophy of Science and Cognitive Psychology.Hanne Andersen, Peter Barker & Xiang Chen - 1996 - Philosophical Psychology 9 (3):347 – 363.
    Drawing on the results of modem psychology and cognitive science we suggest that the traditional theory of concepts is no longer tenable, and that the alternative account proposed by Kuhn may now be seen to have independent empirical support quite apart from its success as part of an account of scientific change. We suggest that these mechanisms can also be understood as special cases of general cognitive structures revealed by cognitive science. Against this background, incommensurability is not an insurmountable obstacle (...)
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  4.  37
    Realism and Instrumentalism in Sixteenth Century Astronomy: A Reappraisal.Peter Barker & Bernard R. Goldstein - 1998 - Perspectives on Science 6 (3):232-258.
    : We question the claim, common since Duhem, that sixteenth century astronomy, and especially the Wittenberg interpretation of Copernicus, was instrumentalistic rather than realistic. We identify a previously unrecognized Wittenberg astronomer, Edo Hildericus (Hilderich von Varel), who presents a detailed exposition of Copernicus's cosmology that is incompatible with instrumentalism. Quotations from other sixteenth century astronomers show that knowledge of the real configuration of the heavens was unattainable practically, rather than in principle. Astronomy was limited to quia demonstrations, although demonstration propter (...)
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  5. Continuity Through Revolutions: A Frame-Based Account of Conceptual Change During Scientific Revolutions.Xiang Chen & Peter Barker - 2000 - Philosophy of Science 67 (3):223.
    In this paper we examine the pattern of conceptual change during scientific revolutions by using methods from cognitive psychology. We show that the changes characteristic of scientific revolutions, especially taxonomic changes, can occur in a continuous manner. Using the frame model of concept representation to capture structural relations within concepts and the direct links between concept and taxonomy, we develop an account of conceptual change in science that more adequately reflects the current understanding that episodes like the Copernican revolution are (...)
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  6.  55
    Incommensurability and Conceptual Change During the Copernican Revolution.Peter Barker - 2001 - In Paul Hoyningen-Huene & Howard Sankey (eds.), Incommensurability and Related Matters. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 241--273.
  7. Kuhn's Theory of Scientific Revolutions and Cognitive Psychology.Xiang Chen, Hanne Andersen & Peter Barker - 1998 - Philosophical Psychology 11 (1):5 – 28.
    In a previous article we have shown that Kuhn's theory of concepts is independently supported by recent research in cognitive psychology. In this paper we propose a cognitive re-reading of Kuhn's cyclical model of scientific revolutions: all of the important features of the model may now be seen as consequences of a more fundamental account of the nature of concepts and their dynamics. We begin by examining incommensurability, the central theme of Kuhn's theory of scientific revolutions, according to two different (...)
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  8.  44
    The Cognitive Structure of Scientific Revolutions.Peter Barker - 2011 - Erkenntnis 75 (3):445-465.
    For historical epistemology to succeed, it must adopt a defensible set of categories to characterise scientific activity over time. In historically orientated philosophy of science during the twentieth century, the original categories of theory and observation were supplemented or replaced by categories like paradigm, research program and research tradition. Underlying all three proposals was talk about conceptual systems and conceptual structures, attributed to individual scientists or to research communities, however there has been little general agreement on the nature of these (...)
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  9.  5
    Distance and Velocity in Kepler's Astronomy.Peter Barker & Bernard R. Goldstein - 1994 - Annals of Science 51 (1):59-73.
    We will examine Kepler's use of a relation between velocity and distance from a centre of circular motion. This relation plays an essential role, through a derivation in chapter 40 of the Astronomia Nova, in the presentation of the Area Law of planetary motion. Kepler transcends ancient and contemporary applications of the distance-velocity relation by connecting it with his metaphysical commitment to the causal role of the Sun. His second main innovation is to replace the astronomical models of his predecessors (...)
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  10. Kuhn, Incommensurability, and Cognitive Science.Peter Barker - 2001 - Perspectives on Science 9 (4):433-462.
    : This paper continues my application of theories of concepts developed in cognitive psychology to clarify issues in Kuhn's mature account of scientific change. I argue that incommensurability is typically neither global nor total, and that the corresponding form of scientific change occurs incrementally. Incommensurability can now be seen as a local phenomenon restricted to particular points in a conceptual framework represented by a set of nodes. The unaffected parts in the framework constitute the basis for continued communication between the (...)
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  11.  79
    The Tidal Model: A Guide for Mental Health Professionals.Philip J. Barker - 2005 - Brunner-Routledge.
    The Tidal Model represents a significant alternative to mainstream mental health theories, emphasizing how those suffering from mental health problems can benefit from taking a more active role in their own treatment. Based on extensive research, The Tidal Model charts the development of this approach, outlining the theoretical basis of the model to illustrate the benefits of a holistic model of care which promotes self-management and recovery. Clinical examples are also employed to show how, by exploring rather than ignoring a (...)
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  12.  37
    The Role of Comets in the Copernican Revolution.Peter Barker & Bernard R. Goldstein - 1988 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 19 (3):299-319.
  13.  33
    First, Do No Harm: Confronting the Myths of Psychiatric Drugs.P. Barker & P. Buchanan-Barker - 2012 - Nursing Ethics 19 (4):451-463.
    The enduring psychiatric myth is that particular personal, interpersonal and social problems in living are manifestations of ‘mental illness’ or ‘mental disease’, which can only be addressed by ‘treatment’ with psychiatric drugs. Psychiatric drugs are used only to control ‘patient’ behaviour and do not ‘treat’ any specific pathology in the sense understood by physical medicine. Evidence that people, diagnosed with ‘serious’ forms of ‘mental illness’ can ‘recover’, without psychiatric drugs, has been marginalized by drug-focused research, much of this funded by (...)
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  14.  35
    Constructing Copernicus.Peter Barker - 2002 - Perspectives on Science 10 (2):208-227.
    : This paper offers my current view of a joint research project, with Bernard R. Goldstein, that examines Kepler's unification of physics and astronomy. As an organizing theme, I describe the extent to which the work of Kepler led to the appearance of the form of Copernicanism that we accept today. In the half century before Kepler's career began, the understanding of Copernicus and his work was significantly different from the modern one. In successive sections I consider the modern conception (...)
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  15.  2
    The Role of Rothmann in the Dissolution of the Celestial Spheres.Bernard Goldstein & Peter Barker - 1995 - British Journal for the History of Science 28 (4):385-403.
    At the end of the sixteenth century astronomers and others felt compelled to choose among different cosmologies. For Tycho Brahe, who played a central role in these debates, the intersection of the spheres of Mars and the Sun was an outstanding problem that had to be resolved before he made his choice. His ultimate solution was to eliminate celestial spheres in favour of fluid heavens, a crucial step in the abandonment of the Ptolemaic system and the demise of Aristotelian celestial (...)
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  16.  32
    Hertz and Wittgenstein.Peter Barker - 1980 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 11 (3):243-256.
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  17.  7
    The Teaching of Health Care Ethics to Students of Nursing in the UK: A Pilot Study.S. Parsons, P. J. Barker & A. E. Armstrong - 2001 - Nursing Ethics 8 (1):45-56.
    Senior lecturers/lecturers in mental health nursing (11 in round one, nine in round two, and eight in the final round) participated in a three-round Delphi study into the teaching of health care ethics (HCE) to students of nursing. The participants were drawn from six (round one) and four (round three) UK universities. Information was gathered on the organization, methods used and content of HCE modules. Questionnaire responses were transcribed and the content analysed for patterns of interest and areas of convergence (...)
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  18.  8
    Copernicus' First Friends: Physical Copernicanism From 1543 to 1610.Katherine A. Tredwell & Peter Barker - 2007 - Filozofski Vestnik 2.
    Between the appearance of Copernicus’ De Revolutionibus in 1543 and the works of Kepler and Galileo that appeared in 1609–10, there were probably no more than a dozen converts to physical heliocentrism. Following Westman we take this list to include Rheticus, Maestlin, Rothmann, Kepler, Bruno, Galileo, Digges, Harriot, de Zúńiga, and Stevin, but we include Gemma Frisius and William Gilbert, and omit Thomas Harriot. In this paper we discuss the reasons this tiny group of true Copernicans give for believing that (...)
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  19.  37
    Copernicus, the Orbs, and the Equant.Peter Barker - 1990 - Synthese 83 (2):317 - 323.
    I argue that Copernicus accepted the reality of celestial spheres on the grounds that the equant problem is unintelligible except as a problem about real spheres. The same considerations point to a number of generally unnoticed liabilities of Copernican astronomy, especially gaps between the spheres, and the failure of some spheres to obey the principle that their natural motion is to rotate. These difficulties may be additional reasons for Copernicus's reluctance to publish, and also stand in the way of strict (...)
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  20.  5
    Working with the Metaphor of Life and Death.P. Barker - 2000 - Medical Humanities 26 (2):97-102.
    The experience of being human is intangible. As a result, descriptions of human experience rely heavily on metaphor to convey something of that whole lived experience. By contrast, contemporary scientific narratives of the mind emphasise the form of human thought and emotion, over the content of people's experience, where constructive attempts are made to explain the experience of self, through metaphorical allusion. This paper considers the importance of metaphor as a vehicle for expressing and exploring selfhood. Examples from the psychiatric (...)
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  21. Duhem and Continuity in the History of Science.Roger Ariew & Peter Barker - 1992 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 46 (182):323-343.
     
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  22. The Role of Religion in the Lutheran Response to Copernicus.Peter Barker - 2000 - In Margaret J. Osler (ed.), Rethinking the Scientific Revolution. Cambridge University Press. pp. 59--88.
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  23.  2
    Untangling the Net Metaphor.Peter Barker - 1979 - Philosophy Research Archives 5:182-199.
    The longest remarks in the section of the Tractatus devoted to science introduce the net metaphor in a discussion of Newtonian mechanics. These sections of the Tractatus are generally believed to be inconsistent with the rest of the book. After a brief description of these difficulties and some relevant historical background I suggest a re-interpretation of the net metaphor in terms of contemporary debates about mechanics. This interpretation shows that the account of science in the Tractatus is an application of (...)
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  24.  21
    Duhem on Maxwell: A Case-Study in the Interrelations of History of Science and Philosophy of Science.Roger Ariew & Peter Barker - 1986 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1986:145 - 156.
    We examine Duhem's critique of Maxwell, especially Duhem's complaints that Maxwell's theory is too bold or not systematic enough, that it is too dependent on models, and that its concepts are not continuous with those of the past. We argue that these complaints are connected by Duhem's historical criterion for the evaluation of physical theories. We briefly compare Duhem's criterion of historical continuity with similar criteria developed by "historicists" like Kuhn and Lakatos. We argue that Duhem's rejection of theoretical pluralism (...)
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  25.  5
    Jean Pena (1528-58) and Stoic Physics in the Sixteenth Century.Peter Barker - 1985 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 23 (S1):93-107.
  26.  12
    Cognitive Appraisal and Power: David Brewster, Henry Brougham, and the Tactics of the Emission—Undulatory Controversy During the Early 1850s.Xiang Chen & Peter Barker - 1992 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 23 (1):75-101.
  27.  12
    Uncle Ludwig's Book About Science.Peter Barker - 1982 - Philosophical Topics 13 (Supplement):71-78.
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  28.  46
    The Tidal Model: The Lived-Experience in Person-Centred Mental Health Nursing Care.Phil Barker - 2001 - Nursing Philosophy 2 (3):213-223.
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  29.  35
    Can Scientific History Repeat?Peter Barker - 1980 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1980:20 - 28.
    Although Kuhn, Lakatos and Laudan disagree on many points, these three widely accepted accounts of scientific growth do agree on certain key features of scientific revolutions. This minimal agreement is sufficient to place stringent restraints on the historical development of science. In particular it follows from the common features of their accounts that scientific history can never repeat. Using the term 'supertheory' to denote indifferently the large scale historical entitites employed in all three accounts, it is shown that a supertheory (...)
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  30.  20
    "Frege and Peirce".Patrick Barker - 1985 - Semiotics:3-14.
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  31. Revolution and Continuity Essays in the History and Philosophy of Early Modern Science.Roger Ariew & Peter Barker - 1991
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  32.  12
    The World of Rome.Peter Barker - 1998 - The Classical Review 48 (2):417-419.
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  33.  19
    Kepler's Geometrical Cosmology.Peter Barker - 1989 - Review of Metaphysics 42 (4):826-828.
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  34.  6
    The Reflexivity Problem in the Psychology of Science.Peter Barker - 1989 - In Barry Gholson (ed.), Psychology of Science: Contributions to Metascience. Cambridge University Press. pp. 92--114.
  35. The Required Role of the Psychiatric- Mental Health Nurse in Primary Health- Care: An Augmented Delphi Study.Louise Walker, Phil Barker & Pauline Pearson - 2000 - Nursing Inquiry 7 (2):91-102.
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  36.  3
    Reconstructing Scientific Revolutions: Thomas S. Kuhn's Philosophy of Science by Paul Hoyningen-Huene; Alexander J. Levine. [REVIEW]Peter Barker - 1994 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 85:193-195.
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  37.  30
    Mental Health in an Age of Celebrity: The Courage to Care.P. Barker & P. Buchanan-Barker - 2008 - Medical Humanities 34 (2):110-114.
    Modern psychiatry, which once focused only on the containment and “cure” of madness, has evolved into a mental health industry, where almost every aspect of human life, may be cast as a “mental disorder”. In Western countries, a narcissistic appetite for self-improvement and “well-being” has evolved over the past 50 years, mirroring the emergence of the celebrity culture. These developments appear linked to a fading of interest in the traditional concept of human caring, leading to a further marginalisation of people (...)
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  38.  6
    Jean Pena and Stoic Physics in the 16th Century.Peter Barker - 1984 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 23 (Supplement):93-107.
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  39.  20
    The World of Rome: An Introduction to Roman Culture. P Jones, K Sidwell (Edd.).P. Barker - 1998 - The Classical Review 48 (2):417-419.
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  40.  20
    New Foundations in the History of Astronomy: Four Papers in Honor of Bernard R. Goldstein.Peter Barker - 2002 - Perspectives on Science 10 (2):151-154.
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  41.  5
    Stoic alternatives to Aristotelian cosmology : Pena, Rothmann and Brahe.Peter Barker - 2008 - Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 2 (2):265-286.
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  42.  7
    Why Was Copernicus a Copernican?Peter Barker, Peter Dear, J. R. Christianson & Robert S. Westman - 2014 - Metascience 23 (2):203-223.
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  43.  12
    R. Jordan (Ed.): Virgil : Aeneid II . Pp. Xvi + 105, Ills. Bristol: Bristol Classical Press, 1999. Paper, £8.95. ISBN: 1-85399-542-. [REVIEW]Peter Barker - 2000 - The Classical Review 50 (01):292-.
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  44.  4
    Training the Intelligent Eye: Understanding Illustrations in Early Modern Astronomy Texts.Kathleen Crowther & Peter Barker - 2013 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 104:429-470.
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  45.  3
    582 Index 2001, Volume 8.H. H. Abu-Saad, H. A. Akinsola, P. Alderson, G. Anderson, A. E. Armstrong, W. Austin, P. J. Barker, G. Benhamou-Jantelet, M. Bergsten & M. E. Cameron - 2001 - Nursing Ethics 8 (6).
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  46.  12
    Notice. The Romans: An Introduction. A Kamm.P. Barker - 1997 - The Classical Review 47 (1):217-218.
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  47.  3
    Bearing the Heavens: Tycho Brahe and the Astronomical Community of the Late Sixteenth Century. [REVIEW]Peter Barker - 2008 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 99:398-399.
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  48.  3
    Philosophy and the New Physics by Jonathan Powers. [REVIEW]Peter Barker - 1984 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 75:391-392.
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  49.  1
    Discipline and Experience: The Mathematical Way in the Scientific RevolutionPeter Dear.Peter Barker - 1997 - Isis 88 (1):122-124.
  50.  2
    Chronology of Eclipses and Comets, A.D. 1-1000 by D. Justin Schove; Alan Fletcher. [REVIEW]Roger Ariew & Peter Barker - 1986 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 77:347-348.
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