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  1. Cultivating Curious and Creative Minds: The Role of Teachers and Teacher Educators, Part I.Annette D. Digby, Gadi Alexander, Carole G. Basile, Kevin Cloninger, F. Michael Connelly, Jessica T. DeCuir-Gunby, John P. Gaa, Herbert P. Ginsburg, Angela McNeal Haynes, Ming Fang He, Terri R. Hebert, Sharon Johnson, Patricia L. Marshall, Joan V. Mast, Allison W. McCulloch, Christina Mengert, Christy M. Moroye, F. Richard Olenchak, Wynnetta Scott-Simmons, Merrie Snow, Derrick M. Tennial, P. Bruce Uhrmacher, Shijing Xu & JeongAe You (eds.) - 2010 - R&L Education.
    Presents a plethora of approaches to developing human potential in areas not conventionally addressed. Organized in two parts, this international collection of essays provides viable educational alternatives to those currently holding sway in an era of high-stakes accountability.
     
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    An Aesthetic Analysis of Confucian Teaching and Learning: The Case of Qifashi Teaching in China.Lingqi Meng & P. Bruce Uhrmacher - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 51 (1):24-44.
    In comparative studies, Confucian teaching and learning have multiple meanings. On the one hand, they refer to contemporary educational practices and contexts in Asian countries and regions such as mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan, South Korea, and Singapore. Comparative researchers contend that Confucian heritage Culture, a mixed and blended cultural tradition of Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism, has heavily influenced these countries and regions.1 As a result, their educational practices and contexts are different from those in Western countries.2 One indication (...)
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    Aesthetic, Spiritual, and Flow Experiences: Contrasts and Educational Implications.P. Bruce Uhrmacher, Christy McConnell Moroye & Bradley Conrad - 2016 - Education and Culture 32 (1):131.
    The idea for our paper began with a practical problem. As curricularists dedicated to an aesthetic approach to teaching, curriculum, and learning, we regularly provide workshops on this topic for teachers in K–12 schools. Our own work is based on Dewey’s aesthetic ideas1 and we have developed a theory called CRISPA2 that teachers may employ to create what we might call “wow” experiences in their own classrooms.3 That is, they can set up the conditions for students to have aesthetic experiences (...)
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