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Peter Forrest [121]P. Forrest [20]Pj Forrest [1]Peter V. Forrest [1]
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Profile: Peter V. Forrest (Oxford University)
Profile: Pj Forrest
Profile: Patrick Forrest (Washington State University)
  1. The Real but Dead Past: A Reply to Braddon-Mitchell.Peter Forrest - 2004 - Analysis 64 (4):358–362.
    In "How Do We Know It Is Now Now?" David Braddon-Mitchell (Analysis 2004) develops an objection to the thesis that the past is real but the future is not. He notes my response to this, namely that the past, although real, is lifeless and (a fortiori?) lacking in sentience. He argues, however, that this response, which I call 'the past is dead hypothesis', is not tenable if combined with 'special relativity'. My purpose in this reply is to argue that, on (...)
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  2. Can a Soufflé Rise Twice? Van Inwagen’s Irresponsible Time-Travelers.Peter Forrest - 2010 - Oxford Studies in Metaphysics 5:29-39.
  3. Ways Worlds Could Be.Peter Forrest - 1986 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 64 (1):15 – 24.
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  4.  24
    A Multicultural Examination of Business Ethics Perceptions.Dean E. Allmon, Henry C. K. Chen, Thomas K. Pritchett & Pj Forrest - 1997 - Journal of Business Ethics 16 (2):183-188.
    This study provides an evaluation of ethical business perception of busIness students from three countries: Australia, Taiwan and the United States. Although statistically significant differences do exist there is significant agreement with the way students perceive ethical/unethical practices in business. The findings of this paper indicate a universality of business ethical perceptions.
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  5.  49
    Developmental Theism: From Pure Will to Unbounded Love.Peter Forrest - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    Introduction -- Overview -- Theism, simplicity, and properly anthropocentric metaphysics -- Materialism and dualism -- The power, knowledge, and motives of the primordial God -- The existence of the primordial God -- God changes -- Understanding evil -- The Trinity -- The Incarnation -- Concluding remarks.
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  6.  99
    Mereotopology without Mereology.Peter Forrest - 2010 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 39 (3):229-254.
    Mereotopology is that branch of the theory of regions concerned with topological properties such as connectedness. It is usually developed by considering the parthood relation that characterizes the, perhaps non-classical, mereology of Space (or Spacetime, or a substance filling Space or Spacetime) and then considering an extra primitive relation. My preferred choice of mereotopological primitive is interior parthood . This choice will have the advantage that filters may be defined with respect to it, constructing “points”, as Peter Roeper has done (...)
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  7. Introduction: Truth Maker and its Variants.Peter Forrest & Drew Khlentzos - 2000 - Logique Et Analyse 43 (169-170):3-15.
     
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  8.  55
    General Facts, Physical Necessity and the Metaphysics of Time.Peter Forrest - 2006 - Oxford Studies in Metaphysics 2:137-154.
    In this chapter I assume that we accept, perhaps reluctantly, general facts, that is states of affairs corresponding to universal generalizations. I then argue that, without any addition, this ontology provides us with physical necessities, and moreover with various grades of physical necessity, including the strongest grade, which I call absolute physical necessity. In addition there are consequences for our understanding of time. For this account, which I call the Mortmain Theory, provides a defence of No Futurism against an otherwise (...)
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  9.  67
    The Incarnation: A Philosophical Case for Kenosis.Peter Forrest - 2000 - Religious Studies 36 (2):127-140.
    As a preliminary, I shall clarify the kenotic position by arguing that a position which is often called kenotic is actually a quasi-kenotic version of the classical account, according to which Jesus had normal divine powers but chose not to exercise them. After this preliminary, I discuss three problems with the strict kenotic account. The first is that kenosis conflicts with the standard list of attributes considered essential to God. The second problem is posed by the Exaltation, namely the resumption (...)
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  10.  53
    Nonclassical Mereology and Its Application to Sets.Peter Forrest - 2002 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 43 (2):79-94.
    Part One of this paper is a case against classical mereology and for Heyting mereology. This case proceeds by first undermining the appeal of classical mereology and then showing how it fails to cohere with our intuitions about a measure of quantity. Part Two shows how Heyting mereology provides an account of sets and classes without resort to any nonmereological primitive.
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  11. Is Space-Time Discrete or Continuous? — An Empirical Question.Peter Forrest - 1995 - Synthese 103 (3):327--354.
    In this paper I present the Discrete Space-Time Thesis, in a way which enables me to defend it against various well-known objections, and which extends to the discrete versions of Special and General Relativity with only minor difficulties. The point of this presentation is not to convince readers that space-time really is discrete but rather to convince them that we do not yet know whether or not it is. Having argued that it is an open question whether or not space-time (...)
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  12. An Argument Against David Lewis' Theory of Possible Worlds.Peter Forrest & D. M. Armstrong - 1984 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 62 (2):164 – 168.
  13.  2
    The Antipodean Philosopher: Public Lectures on Philosophy in Australia and New Zealand.John Bigelow, Raymond D. Bradley, Andrew Brennan, Tony Coady, Peter Forrest, James Franklin, Karen Green, Russell Grigg, Matthew Sharpe, Jeanette Kennett, Neil Levy, Catriona Mackenzie, Gary Malinas, Chris Mortensen, Robert Nola & Paul Patton - 2011 - Lexington Books.
    Series of lectures on many aspects of philosophy in Australia.
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  14.  61
    Grit or Gunk.Peter Forrest - 2004 - The Monist 87 (3):351-370.
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  15. Uniform Grounding of Truth and the Growing Block Theory: A Reply to Heathwood.Peter Forrest - 2006 - Analysis 66 (290):161–163.
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  16.  51
    Neither Magic nor Mereology: A Reply to Lewis.Peter Forrest - 1986 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 64 (1):89 – 91.
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  17. The Evidence for God: Religious Knowledge Reexamined.P. Forrest - 2012 - Philosophical Review 121 (4):622-625.
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  18.  53
    In Defence of the Phase Space Picture.Peter Forrest - 1999 - Synthese 119 (3):299-311.
    While the Phase Space formulation of quantum mechanics has received considerable attention it has seldom been defended as a viable interpretation. In this paper I expound the Phase Space Picture, use it to provide a quasi-classical 'hidden variables' interpretation of quantum mechanics and offer a defence of it against various objections.
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  19.  31
    Can Phenomenology Determine the Content of Thought?Peter V. Forrest - 2017 - Philosophical Studies 174 (2):403-424.
    According to a number of popular intentionalist theories in philosophy of mind, phenomenology is essentially and intrinsically intentional: phenomenal properties are identical to intentional properties of a certain type, or at least, the phenomenal character of an experience necessarily fixes a type of intentional content. These views are attractive, but it is questionable whether the reasons for accepting them generalize from sensory-perceptual experience to other kinds of experience: for example, agentive, moral, aesthetic, or cognitive experience. Meanwhile, a number of philosophers (...)
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  20.  54
    The Identity of Indiscernibles.Peter Forrest - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  21.  79
    The Operator Theory of Instantiation.Peter Forrest - 2006 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 84 (2):213 – 228.
    Armstrong holds the Supervenience Theory of instantiation, namely that the instantiation of universals by particulars supervenes upon what particulars and what universals there are, where supervenience is stipulated to be explanatory or dependent supervenience. I begin by rejecting the Supervenience Theory of instantiation. Having done so it is then tempting to take instantiation as primitive. This has, however, an awkward consequence, undermining one of the main advantages universals have over tropes. So I examine another account hinted at by Armstrong. This (...)
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  22.  48
    Divine Fission: A New Way of Moderating Social Trinitarianism.Peter Forrest - 1998 - Religious Studies 34 (3):281-297.
    This paper is a contribution to the programme of moderating Social Trinitarianism to achieve a fairly orthodox result. I follow Swinburne in relying heavily on divine thisnessless and in the important speculation that the Trinity arose from a primordial 'unitarian' God. In this paper I explain why I disagree with Swinburnes's account of how the Trinity came into being and I propose an alternative in which the primordial God fissions into three divine persons for the sake of a loving community.
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  23.  32
    Religious Faith and Intellectual Virtue.Peter Forrest - forthcoming - Analysis:anw024.
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  24.  94
    Physical Necessity and the Passage of Time.Peter Forrest - 1996 - In P. Riggs (ed.), Natural Kinds, Laws of Nature and Scientific Methodology. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 49--62.
  25.  48
    The Nature of Number.Peter Forrest & D. M. Armstrong - 1987 - Philosophical Papers 16 (3):165-186.
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  26.  77
    Universals as Sense-Data.Peter Forrest - 2005 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 71 (3):622 - 631.
    This paper concerns the structure of appearances. I argue that to be appeared to in a certain way is to be aware of one or more universals. Universals therefore function like the sense-data, once highly favoured but now out of fashion. For instance, to be appeared to treely, in a visual way, is to be aware of the complex relation, being tree-shaped and tree-coloured and being in front of, a relation of a kind which could be instantiated by a material (...)
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  27.  35
    Replying to the Anti-God Challenge: A God Without Moral Character Acts Well.Peter Forrest - 2012 - Religious Studies 48 (1):35 - 43.
    Several authors, including Stephen Law in this journal, have argued that the case for an evil God is (about) as strong as for a good God. In this article I take up the challenge on behalf of theists who, like Richard Swinburne, argue for an agent of unrestricted power and knowledge as the ultimate explanation of all contingent truths. I shall argue that an evil God is much less probable than a good one. I do so by (1) distinguishing the (...)
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  28.  23
    The Problem of Evil: Two Neglected Defences. [REVIEW]Peter Forrest - 1981 - Sophia 20 (1):49-54.
    Theism can be defended against the Philosophical Problem of Evil, provided one rejects the Principle of Perfectionism, without relying on the Greater Good Defence or, unless one is a libertarian, the Free-Will Defence.A corollary of the All Good Possible Worlds Defence and the No Best Possible World Defence, is that God’s goodness need not determine God’s choice to create. The reasons, if any, which God has are relevant to the Theological Problem of Evil but not to the Philosophical Problem of (...)
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  29. Why Richard Swinburne Won't 'Rot in Hell': A Defense of Tough-Minded Theodicy. [REVIEW]Peter Forrest - 2010 - Sophia 49 (1):37-47.
    In his recent paper in Sophia , ‘Theodicy: The Solution to the Problem of Evil, or Part of the Problem?’ Nick Trakakis endorses the position that theodicy, whether intellectually successful or not, is a morally obnoxious enterprise. My aim in this paper is to defend theodicy from this accusation. I concede that God the Creator is a moral monster by human standards and neither to be likened to a loving parent nor imitated. Nonetheless, God is morally perfect. What is abhorrent (...)
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  30.  10
    Vectors on Curved Space.Peter Forrest - 2009 - Dialectica 63 (4):491-501.
    In this paper I provide an ontology for the co‐variant vectors, contra‐variant vectors and tensors that are familiar from General Relativity. This ontology is developed in response to a problem that Timothy Maudlin uses to argue against universals in the interpretation of physics. The problem is that if vector quantities are universals then there should be a way of identifying the same vector quantity at two different places, but there is no absolute identification of vector quantities, merely a path‐relative one.My (...)
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  31. Is Motion Change of Location?Peter Forrest - 1984 - Analysis 44 (4):177 - 178.
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  32. Quantum Metaphysics.Peter Forrest - 1988 - Blackwell.
    The book comprises an enquiry into what quantum theory shows us about the world. Its aim is to sort out which metaphysical speculations are tenable and which are not. After an initial discussion of realism, the author provides a non-technical exposition of quantum theory and a criticism of the proposal that quantum theory should make us revise our beliefs about logic. He then discusses the various problems and puzzles which make quantum theory both interesting and perplexing. The text defends three (...)
     
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  33.  19
    The Personal Pantheist Conception of God.P. Forrest - unknown
    This chapter is a case for the pantheist conception considered as a species of theism, rather than a rival to it. The starting point, the premise of the argument, is properly anthropomorphic metaphysics, which I propose as a rival to scientific naturalism; I begin, then, by stating my version of pantheism, by expounding PAM, and by sketching my argument.
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  34.  55
    Mereological Summation and the Question of Unique Fusion.Peter Forrest - 2007 - Analysis 67 (295):237–242.
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  35. The Fixed and the Zerked.Peter Forrest - 1987 - Mind 96 (382):245-246.
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  36. The Dynamics of Belief: A Normative Logic.Peter Forrest - 1986 - Blackwell.
  37.  59
    Supervenience: The Grand-Property Hypothesis.Peter Forrest - 1988 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 66 (March):1-12.
    THE ARTICLE IS AN ATTACK ON THE MYSTERY OR REDUCTION DILEMMA FOR SUPERVENIENCE. THIS IS THE DILEMMA THAT EITHER SUPERVENIENCE IS MYSTERIOUS OR THE SUPERVENIENT IS REDUCIBLE TO THE SUBVENIENT. A NONMYSTERIOUS, NONREDUCTIVE ACCOUNT OF SUPERVENIENCE IS PROPOSED, BASED ON THE METAPHYSICAL SPECULATION THAT SUPERVENIENT TERMS AND PHRASES APPLY TO OBJECTS WHOSE INTRINSIC NATURES THEMSELVES HAVE AN APPROPRIATE PROPERTY. SINCE THIS IS A PROPERTY OF A NATURE IT IS A PROPERTY OF A PROPERTY, THAT IS, A GRAND-PROPERTY. SUPERVENIENCE FOLLOWS FROM (...)
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  38.  37
    Collective Guilt; Individual Shame.Peter Forrest - 2006 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 30 (1):145–153.
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  39.  48
    Why Most of Us Should Be Scientific Realists.Peter Forrest - 1994 - The Monist 77 (1):47-70.
  40.  8
    God Without the Supernatural.Willem B. Drees & P. Forrest - 2000 - Zygon 35:207-209.
  41.  14
    Einstein's Genie: Spacetime Out of the Bottle, by Graham Nerlich.Peter Forrest - 2016 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 94 (4):829-832.
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  42.  18
    Reality and Humean Supervenience: Essays on the Philosophy of David Lewis.Preyer Gerhard, Siebelt Frank, D. M. Armstrong, Bennett Jonathan, Bigelow John, Bonevac Daniel, Bricker Phillip, Forrest Peter, Horgan Terence, W. Noonan Harold, Teller Paul & Tye Michael (eds.) - 2001 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Reality and Humean Supervenience confronts the reader with central aspects in the philosophy of David Lewis, whose work in ontology, metaphysics, logic, probability, philosophy of mind, and language articulates a unique and systematic foundation for modern physicalism.
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  43.  46
    Common Sense and a “Wigner-Dirac” Approach to Quantum Mechanics.Peter Forrest - 1997 - The Monist 80 (1):131-159.
  44.  24
    New Problems with Repeatable Properties and with Change.Peter Forrest - 1990 - Noûs 24 (4):543-556.
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  45.  86
    Occam's Razor and Possible Worlds.Peter Forrest - 1982 - The Monist 65 (4):456--464.
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  46.  76
    Backwards Causation in Defense of Free Will.Peter Forrest - 1985 - Mind 94 (April):210-17.
  47.  30
    Counting the Cost of Modal Realism.Peter Forrest - 2001 - In Gerhard Preyer (ed.), Reality and Humean Supervenience: Essays on the Philosophy of David Lewis. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 93--103.
    Conceivability is, I say, prima facie evidence for possibility. Hence, we may count the cost of theories about possibility by listing the ways in which, according to the theory in question, something conceivable is said nonetheless to be impossible. More succinctly we may state a principle, Hume's razor to put alongside Ockham's. Hume's razor says that necessities are not to be multiplied more than necessary. In this paper I count the cost of David Lewis's modal realism, showing that many of (...)
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  48.  10
    Space Curvature and Repeatable Properties: Mormann's Perspectival Theory.Peter Forrest - 1996 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 74 (2):319 – 323.
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  49.  50
    From Ontology to Topology in the Theory of Regions.Peter Forrest - 1996 - The Monist 79 (1):34--50.
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  50.  2
    Pantheism.Peter Forrest - 2016 - Roczniki Filozoficzne 64 (4):67-91.
    In this paper I have had two aims. One was to describe a number of pantheist or near pantheist religious attitudes, including the influence of many worlds theories. The other was to indicate some of the ways we might arrive at Pantheism.One final remark: when assessing religious positions the intellectual grounds for accepting or rejecting them should, I suggest, be whether they make sense of things, that is, enable us to understand. The ways to Pantheism, or to near Pantheism, should (...)
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