Search results for 'P. J. E. Kail' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  29
    P. J. E. Kail (2009). Naturalism, Method and Genealogy in Beyond Selflessness. European Journal of Philosophy 17 (1):113-120.
    The full-text of this article is not currently available in ORA, but you may be able to access the article via the publisher copy link on this record page. Citation: Kail, P. J. E. . 'Naturalism, method and genealogy in Beyond Selflessness', European Journal of Philosophy, 17, 113-120. Copyright © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
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  2. P. J. E. Kail, Naturalism, Method and Genealogy in Beyond Selflessness.
    The full-text of this article is not currently available in ORA, but you may be able to access the article via the publisher copy link on this record page. Citation: Kail, P. J. E.. 'Naturalism, method and genealogy in Beyond Selflessness', European Journal of Philosophy, 17, 113-120. Copyright © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
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  3. P. J. E. Kail (2003). I. Bernard Cohen and George E. Smith (Eds): The Cambridge Companion to Newton. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (3):540-541.
     
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  4.  76
    Manuel Dries & P. J. E. Kail, Introduction to Nietzsche on Mind and Nature.
    This chapter provides summaries of the chapter of this book and introduces the major themes and debates addressed in the volume. Discussed are Nietzsche’s metaphysics; his philosophy of mind in light of contemporary views; the question of panpsychism of Beyond Good and Evil 36; the rejection of dualism in favour of monism, in particular a monism of value; Nietzsche’s positions on consciousness and embodied cognition in light of recent cognitive science; a conception of freedom and agency based on an intrinsically (...)
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  5.  35
    P. J. E. Kail (2007). Understanding Hume's Natural History of Religion. Philosophical Quarterly 57 (227):190–211.
    Hume's 'Natural History of Religion' offers a naturalized account of the causes of religious thought, an investigation into its 'origins' rather than its 'foundation in reason'. Hume thinks that if we consider only the causes of religious belief, we are provided with a reason to suspend the belief. I seek to explain why this is so, and what role the argument plays in Hume's wider campaign against the rational acceptability of religious belief. In particular, I argue that the work threatens (...)
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  6.  31
    P. J. E. Kail (2001). Projection and Necessity in Hume. European Journal of Philosophy 9 (1):24–54.
    This paper discusses the metaphor of projection in relation to Hume’s treatment of causal necessity. I argue that the best understanding of projection shows it to be compatible with taking Hume to be a ‘sceptical realist’ about causal necessity, albeit an agnostic one.
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  7.  60
    P. J. E. Kail (2007). History's Back in the Past. The Philosophers' Magazine 39 (39):69-70.
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  8.  33
    P. J. E. Kail (2005). Hume's Natural History of Perception. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (3):503 – 519.
  9.  43
    P. J. E. Kail (2003). Is Hume a Causal Realist? British Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (3):509 – 520.
    This is a review essay of Richman and Read (eds.) _The New Hume Debate (London: Routledge, 2000). The essay is highly critical of how the debate concerning whether Hume is a causal realist is presently conceived by its opponents, and argues in favour of a _New Hume position.
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  10.  66
    P. J. E. Kail (2008). Hume, Malebranche and 'Rationalism'. Philosophy 83 (3):311-332.
    Traditionally Hume is seen as offering an 'empiricist' critique of 'rationalism'. This view is often illustrated -- or rejected -- by comparing Hume's views with those of Descartes'. However the textual evidence shows that Hume's most sustained engagement with a canonical 'rationalist' is with Nicolas Malebranche. The author shows that the fundamental differences (among the many similarities) between the two on the self and causal power do indeed rest on a principled distinction between 'rationalism' and 'empiricism', and that there is (...)
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  11.  31
    P. J. E. Kail (2009). Nietzsche and Hume: Naturalism and Explanation. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 37 (1):5-22.
  12.  89
    P. J. E. Kail (2008). Review: Helen Beebee: Hume on Causation. [REVIEW] Mind 117 (466):451-456.
  13.  63
    P. J. E. Kail (2011). Hume's Living Legacy. The Philosophers' Magazine 54 (54):63-68.
    He is the darling of naturalism or the bogeyman of scepticism, a friend to virtue or an unwitting party to incipient nihilism. He is politically conservative, or a liberator from old views. He is a fideist, an advocate of faith over reason, or a precursor of Richard Dawkins.
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  14.  91
    P. J. E. Kail (2003). Review: Reading Hume on Human Understanding: Essays on the First Enquiry. [REVIEW] Mind 112 (448):770-773.
  15.  25
    P. J. E. Kail (2001). Hutcheson's Moral Sense: Skepticism, Realism, and Secondary Qualities. History of Philosophy Quarterly 18 (1):57 - 77.
  16.  51
    P. J. E. Kail (2007). Review: Analytic Philosophy and the History of Philosophy. [REVIEW] Mind 116 (462):483-486.
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  17.  8
    P. J. E. Kail (2015). Religion and Its Natural History. Res Philosophica 92 (3):675-689.
  18.  6
    P. J. E. Kail (2016). Hume’s Epistemology in the Treatise: A Veritistic Interpretation, by Frederick F. Schmitt. Mind 125 (497):256-260.
  19.  2
    P. J. E. Kail (2016). Hume's ‘Manifest Contradictions’. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 78:147-160.
  20.  25
    P. J. E. Kail (2010). Causation, Fictionalism, and Non-Cognitivism: Berkeley and Hume. In Silvia Parigi (ed.), George Berkeley: Religion and Science in the Age of Enlightenment. Springer.
  21.  43
    P. J. E. Kail (2001). Reason, Custom and the True Philosophy. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Philosophy 9 (2):361 – 366.
  22.  31
    P. J. E. Kail (2010). Précis of Projection and Realism in Hume's Philosophy. Hume Studies 36 (1):61-65.
    The title of my book, Projection and Realism in Hume's Philosophy, might mislead. One might protest, with some justification, that since neither "projection" nor "realism" is Hume's term and that both carry a severe threat of anachronism, discussing them in connection with Hume is misguided. Why might the readers of this journal wish to read such a work?Well, the first thing to note is that Hume's name has come to be associated with the metaphor of projection, understood as having some (...)
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  23.  4
    P. J. E. Kail (2015). Kevin Meeker, Hume's Radical Scepticism and the Fate of Naturalized Epistemology, Palgrave Innovations in Philosophy, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013, 216 Pp., £55 , ISBN 9781137025548. [REVIEW] Dialectica 69 (4):623-630.
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  24.  33
    P. J. E. Kail (2007). Berkeley, the Ends of Language, and the Principles of Human Knowledge. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 107 (1pt3):265-278.
    This paper discusses some key connections between Berkeley's reflections on language in the introduction to his Treatise on the Principles of Human Knowledge and the doctrines espoused in the body of that work, in particular his views on vulgar causal discourse and his response to the objection that his metaphysics imputes massive error to ordinary thought. I argue also that there is some mileage in the view that Berkeley's thought might be an early form of non-cognitivism.
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  25.  40
    P. J. E. Kail (2001). Hume on Knowledge. Harold W. Noonan. Mind 110 (440):1102-1105.
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  26.  23
    P. J. E. Kail (2007). Hume's Theory of Causation. Hume Studies 33 (1):190-192.
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  27.  25
    P. J. E. Kail (2011). Hume's 'A Treatise of Human Nature': An Introduction. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (1):156-160.
  28.  8
    P. J. E. Kail (2010). Causation and Powers in the Seventeenth Century. Metascience 19 (3):399-402.
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  29.  12
    P. J. E. Kail (2012). The Sceptical Beast in the Beastly Sceptic: Human Nature in Hume. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 70:219-231.
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  30.  6
    P. J. E. Kail (2007). Hume's Theory of Causation: A Quasi-Realist Interpretation (Review). [REVIEW] Hume Studies 33 (1):190-192.
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  31. P. J. E. Kail (2007). Leibniz's Dog and Humean Reason. Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 62 (3):65-80.
  32.  11
    P. J. E. Kail (2010). Response to My Critics. Hume Studies 36 (1):97-107.
    I am extremely grateful to all my commentators for their very careful engagement with my book.1 Some disagreements, I think, may stem from my failure to be sufficiently clear and so are only apparent. Other objections are not and seem to be spot on. I will not be able to give fully adequate answers to all the objections, since some require sustained discussion of some very fundamental issues that is simply impossible in this forum.Schliesser's comments concern my discussion of philosophical (...)
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  33.  12
    P. J. E. Kail (2002). Review: Religion and Faction in Hume's Moral Philosophy. [REVIEW] Mind 111 (442):429-434.
  34.  4
    P. J. E. Kail (2013). Moral Judgment. In James A. Harris (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Eighteenth Century. Oxford University Press. pp. 315.
    This chapter discusses various conceptions of moral judgment during the eighteenth century in Britain. It begins with a characterization of moral rationalism that centres on Samuel Clarke and John Locke. It then discusses moral sentimentalism or moral sense theory, which is associated with Shaftesbury, Hutcheson, and Hume, portraying it partly as a reaction to moral rationalism but also as a response to the perceived positions of Hobbes and Mandeville. The chapter then discusses the position of Joseph Butler, Adam Smith’s sophisticated (...)
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  35.  10
    P. J. E. Kail (2007). Of Liberty and Necessity: The Free Will Debate in Eighteenth-Century British Philosophy – James A. Harris. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 57 (228):484–487.
  36.  3
    P. J. E. Kail (2005). Hume's Ethical Conclusion. In Marina Frasca-Spada & P. J. E. Kail (eds.), Impressions of Hume. Oxford University Press.
  37. P. J. E. Kail (2014). Berkeley's a Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.
    George Berkeley's Principles of Human Knowledge is a crucial text in the history of empiricism and in the history of philosophy more generally. Its central and seemingly astonishing claim is that the physical world cannot exist independently of the perceiving mind. The meaning of this claim, the powerful arguments in its favour, and the system in which it is embedded, are explained in a highly lucid and readable fashion and placed in their historical context. Berkeley's philosophy is, in part, a (...)
     
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  38. P. J. E. Kail (2005). Jerry A. Fodor: Hume Variations. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (4):804.
     
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  39. P. J. E. Kail (1999). Johan Van Der Zande and Richard H. Popkin: The Skeptical Tradition Around 1800. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 7:382-383.
     
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  40.  1
    Manuel Dries & P. J. E. Kail (eds.) (2015). Nietzsche on Mind and Nature. Oxford University Press UK.
    This volume presents new essays exploring important aspects of Nietzsche's philosophy in connection with two major themes: mind and nature. A team of leading experts address questions including: What is Nietzsche's conception of mind? How does mind relate with the nature? And what is Nietzsche's conception of nature? They all express the thought that Nietzsche's views on these matters are of great philosophical value, either because those views are consonant with contemporary thinking to a greater or lesser extent or because (...)
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  41. P. J. E. Kail (2018). The Routledge Guidebook to Hume’s a Treatise of Human Nature. Routledge.
  42. P. J. E. Kail (2011). Virtue and Vice. In Desmond M. Clarke & Catherine Wilson (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy in Early Modern Europe. Oxford University Press.
    This article analyses the conception of virtue and vice in early modern Europe. It explains that there were two movements in conceptions of virtue during this period. The first is the Cartesian tradition wherein virtue is intimately related to the control of the passions and the other is the continuation of this theme in Britain in a more aesthetic version. This article describes how the concepts of virtue and vice were softened by an awakening interest in the social emotions and (...)
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  43.  5
    Brian Clack, A. B. P. & C. B. (1996). Dan Cohn-Sherbok. Judaism and Other Faiths. Pp. 186. £40.00.Dan Cohn-Sherbok & Christopher Lewis . Beyond Death: Theological and Philosophical Reflections on Life After Death. Pp. Xii + 219. £40.00 Hbk, £14.99 Pbk.Roy D. Morrison, II. Science, Theology and the Transcendental Horizon: Einstein, Kant and Tillich. Pp. Xxiii + 460. $59·95 Hbk, $39·95 Pbk.Dewi Z. Phillips, J. R. Jones. Pp. 122. £4·95 Pbk.Jean Porter. Moral Action and Christian Ethics. Pp. 254. £35·00.Frank E. Reynolds & David Tracy . Religion and Practical Reason: New Essays in the Comparative Philosophy of Religions. Pp. Ix + 444. $21.95.Keith E. Yandell. The Epistemology of Religious Experience. Pp. Viii + 371. £35·00. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 32 (1):139.
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  44. W. J. (1995). E.-J. Marey's Visual Rhetoric and the Graphic Decomposition of the Body. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 26 (2):175-204.
     
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  45. Eric Schliesser (2010). Philosophical Relations, Natural Relations, and Philosophic Decisionism in Belief in the External World: Comments on P. J. E. Kail, Projection and Realism in Hume's Philosophy. [REVIEW] Hume Studies 36 (1):67-76.
    My critical comments on Part I of P. J. E. Kail's Projection and Realism in Hume's Philosophy are divided into two parts. First, I challenge the exegetical details of Kail's take on Hume's important distinction between natural and philosophical relations. I show that Kail misreads Hume in a subtle fashion. If I am right, then much of the machinery that Kail puts into place for his main argument does different work in Hume than Kail thinks. (...)
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  46.  66
    Donald C. Ainslie (2009). Projection and Realism in Hume's Philosophy. By P. J. E. Kail. [REVIEW] Metaphilosophy 40 (2):292-296.
    Peter Kail’s comprehensive, thoughtful, and challenging book focuses on Hume’s use of projectionFthe appeal to mental phenomena to explain manifest features of the worldFin his treatments of external objects, causation, and morality. Almost all interpreters of Hume acknowledge a role for projection, but Kail is the first to unpack the metaphor, and to show the different ways in which projection works in different domains.
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  47.  49
    L. E. Loeb (2009). Review: P. J. E. Kail: Projection and Realism in Hume's Philosophy. [REVIEW] Mind 118 (469):181-185.
  48.  40
    Kenneth P. Winkler (2010). P.J.E. Kail's Projection and Realism in Hume's Philosophy. [REVIEW] Philosophical Books 51 (3):144-159.
  49.  28
    Angela Coventry (2008). Review: P. J. E. Kail, Projection and Realism in Hume's Philosophy. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (7).
  50.  14
    Donald C. Ainslie (2006). Review of Marina Frasca-Spada, P. J. E. Kail (Eds.), Impressions of Hume. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (4).
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