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  1.  7
    Topology Via Logic.P. T. Johnstone & Steven Vickers - 1991 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 56 (3):1101.
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  2.  8
    Steven Vickers. Topology Via Logic. Cambridge Tracts in Theoretical Computer Science, No. 5. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge Etc. 1989, Xiii + 200 Pp. [REVIEW]P. T. Johnstone - 1991 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 56 (3):1101-1102.
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    Notes on Logic and Set Theory.P. T. Johnstone - 1987 - Cambridge University Press.
    A succinct introduction to mathematical logic and set theory, which together form the foundations for the rigorous development of mathematics. Suitable for all introductory mathematics undergraduates, Notes on Logic and Set Theory covers the basic concepts of logic: first-order logic, consistency, and the completeness theorem, before introducing the reader to the fundamentals of axiomatic set theory. Successive chapters examine the recursive functions, the axiom of choice, ordinal and cardinal arithmetic, and the incompleteness theorems. Dr. Johnstone has included numerous exercises designed (...)
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    Review: Steven Vickers, Topology Via Logic. [REVIEW]P. T. Johnstone - 1991 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 56 (3):1101-1102.
  5.  26
    Finitary Sketches.J. Adámek, P. T. Johnstone, J. A. Makowsky & J. Rosický - 1997 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 62 (3):699-707.
    Finitary sketches, i.e., sketches with finite-limit and finite-colimit specifications, are proved to be as strong as geometric sketches, i.e., sketches with finite-limit and arbitrary colimit specifications. Categories sketchable by such sketches are fully characterized in the infinitary first-order logic: they are axiomatizable by σ-coherent theories, i.e., basic theories using finite conjunctions, countable disjunctions, and finite quantifications. The latter result is absolute; the equivalence of geometric and finitary sketches requires (in fact, is equivalent to) the non-existence of measurable cardinals.
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