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Paolo Vineis [13]P. Vineis [2]
  1.  12
    Causality in Cancer Research: A Journey Through Models in Molecular Epidemiology and Their Philosophical Interpretation.Paolo Vineis, Phyllis Illari & Federica Russo - 2017 - Emerging Themes in Epidemiology 14 (7):1-8.
    In the last decades, Systems Biology (including cancer research) has been driven by technology, statistical modelling and bioinformatics. In this paper we try to bring biological and philosophical thinking back. We thus aim at making diferent traditions of thought compatible: (a) causality in epidemiology and in philosophical theorizing—notably, the “sufcient-component-cause framework” and the “mark transmission” approach; (b) new acquisitions about disease pathogenesis, e.g. the “branched model” in cancer, and the role of biomarkers in this process; (c) the burgeoning of omics (...)
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  2.  20
    Evidence-Based Medicine and Quality of Care.Donna Dickenson & Paolo Vineis - 2002 - Health Care Analysis 10 (3):243-259.
    In this paper we set out to examine thearguments for and against the claim thatEvidence-Based Medicine (EBM) will improve thequality of care. In particular, we examine thefollowing issues.
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  3.  57
    From Figures to Values: The Implicit Ethical Judgements in Our Measures of Health.P. Vineis & R. Satolli - 2012 - Public Health Ethics 5 (1):22-28.
    The objective of the article is to examine the extensions of a clinical measure of efficacy, the Number Needed to Treat (NNT), in different settings including screening, scanning, genetic testing and primary prevention, and the associated ethical implications. We examine several situations in which the use of the NNT or NNS (Number Needed to Screen) has been suggested, such as Prostate-Specific Antigen for prostate cancer, Magnetic Resonance Imaging scans, genetic testing and banning of smoking. For each application, we explore the (...)
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  4.  16
    Environment, Population, and Biology: A Short History of Modern Epidemiology.Alessandra Parodi, David Neasham & Paolo Vineis - 2006 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 49 (3):357-368.
  5.  14
    Evidence-Based Medicine and Ethics: A Practical Approach.P. Vineis - 2004 - Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (2):126-130.
    The clinical decision is supposed to be based on evidence. In fact, what counts as evidence is far from being established. Some definition of "proof" is needed to distinguish between scientific medicine and charlatanism. My thesis is that unfortunately a clear-cut boundary between evidence and lack of evidence cannot be found, for several reasons that I summarise in the paper. Evidence in medicine very often has fuzzy boundaries, and dichotomising fuzziness and uncertainty can have serious consequences. Physicians and patients should (...)
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  6.  62
    Risks, Causality, and the Precautionary Principle.Paolo Vineis & Micaela Ghisleni - 2004 - Topoi 23 (2):203-210.
  7. I Due Dogmi: Oggettività Della Scienza E Integralismo Etico.Paolo Vineis - 2009 - Feltrinelli.
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  8.  31
    Definition and Classification of Cancer: Monothetic or Polythetic?Paolo Vineis - 1993 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 14 (3).
    Since the microbiological revolution, most infectious diseases have been defined and classified according to an etiologic criterion, i.e. the identification of single, external necessary causes (for example, Mycobacterium for tuberculosis). This is not the case with cancer. Not only external necessary causes of cancer have not been identified, but also the morphological classification cannot be based on univocal criteria. Although neoplasia and anaplasia appear to be universal attributes of cancer, these events are only quantitative. Neoplastic growth can be fast or (...)
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  9.  39
    Causality Assessment in Epidemiology.Paolo Vineis - 1991 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 12 (2).
    Epidemiology relies upon a broad interpretation of determinism. This paper discusses analogies with the evolution of the concept of cause in physics, and analyzes the classical nine criteria proposed by Sir Austin Bradford Hill for causal assessment. Such criteria fall into the categories of enumerative induction, eliminative induction, deduction and analogy. All of these four categories are necessary for causal assessment and there is no natural hierarchy among them, although a deductive analysis of the study design is preliminary to any (...)
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  10.  21
    Environmental Risks: Scientific Concepts and Social Perception.Paolo Vineis - 1995 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 16 (2).
    Using the example of air pollution, I criticize a restricted utilitarian view of environmental risks. It is likely that damage to health due to environmental pollution in Western countries is relatively modest in quantitative terms (especially when considering cancer and comparing such damage to the effects of some life-style exposures). However, a strictly quantitative approach, which ranks priorities according to the burden of disease attributable to single causes, is questionable because it does not consider such aspects as inequalities in the (...)
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  11.  10
    La ciabatta e il DNA.Paolo Vineis - 2013 - Iride: Filosofia e Discussione Pubblica 26 (2):401-414.
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  12. Epistemological Issues Raised by Research on Climate Change.Paolo Vineis, Aneire Khan & Flavio D'Abramo - 2011 - In Phyllis McKay Illari, Federica Russo & Jon Williamson (eds.), Causality in the Sciences. Oxford University Press.