9 found
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  1. Primum Nocere: Medical Brain Drain and the Duty to Stay.Luara Ferracioli & Pablo De Lora - 2015 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 40 (5):601-619.
    In this essay, we focus on the moral justification of a highly controversial measure to redress medical brain drain: the duty to stay. We argue that the moral justification for this duty lies primarily in the fact that medical students impose high risks on their fellow citizens while receiving their medical training, which in turn gives them a reciprocity-based reason to temporarily prioritize the medical needs of their fellow citizens.
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  2.  16
    DCDD and Children: A Defense of the “Best Interests” Standard.Pablo De Lora - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (8):21-22.
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  3.  41
    Is multiculturalism bad for health care? The case for re-virgination.Pablo de Lora - 2015 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 36 (2):141-166.
    Hymenoplasty is a surgical procedure requested by women who are expected to remain virgins until marriage. In this article, I assess the ethical and legal challenges raised by this request, both for the individual physician and for the health care system. I argue that performing hymenoplasty is not always an unethical practice and that, under certain conditions, it should be provided by the health care system.
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  4.  26
    What does “presumed consent” might presume? Preservation measures and uncontrolled donation after circulatory determination of death.Pablo de Lora - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (3):403-411.
    One of the most controversial aspects in uncontrolled donation of organs after circulatory death is the initiation of preservation measures before death. I argue that in so-called opting-out systems only under very stringent conditions we might presume consent to the instauration of those measures. Given its current legal framework, I claim that this is not the case of Spain, a well-known country in which consent is presumed—albeit only formally—and where uDCD is currently practiced.
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  5. Autonomía personal, intervención médica y sujetos incapaces1.Pablo de Lora - 2008 - Enrahonar: Quaderns de Filosofía 40 (41):123-140.
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  6.  43
    Bioética, reanimación cardiopulmonar y donación de órganos en asistolia.Pablo de Lora, Iván Ortega-Deballon, David Rodríguez-Arias, José Antonio Seoane, Alfredo Serrano & Rosana Triviño - 2013 - Dilemata 13:283-296.
    The so-called uncontrolled donation after circulatory determination of death (uDCDD) have been implemented in several countries, including Spain and France, to increase the availability of organs for transplantation. These protocols allow obtaining kidneys, livers and lungs of patients who do not survive cardio-pulmonary resuscitation performed in out-of-hospital settings. Simultaneously with the development and recent proliferation of these protocols, some emergency teams have begun to employ unconventional methods of CPR, with still uncertain but promising results. The coexistence of these two possibilities (...)
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  7.  32
    ¿Puede Gracia ser franciscana? Un comentario a Mark Rowlands: “¿Pueden los animales ser morales?”.Pablo de Lora - 2012 - Dilemata 9:33-39.
  8. Two dogmas of constitutionalism: Constitutional rights and judicial review.Pablo de Lora - 2002 - Rechtstheorie 33 (2-4):381-395.
  9.  5
    The Value of Virginity and the Value of the Law: Accommodating Multiculturalism.Pablo de Lora - 2015 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 26 (2):166-171.
    Hymenoplasty is a minor surgical procedure requested by women who, for cultural or religious reasons, need to remain a virgin until marriage. In this article I assess whether the public healthcare system of a liberal state should provide it as part of a policy of multicultural accommodation. I conclude that, in order to remain loyal to certain ethical ideals linked to the rule of law, liberal states should give access to hymenoplasty only to women for whom premarital virginity is a (...)
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