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  1.  45
    Be Bad but Look Good: Can Controversial Industries Enhance Corporate Reputation Through CSR Initiatives?Claudio Aqueveque, Pablo Rodrigo & Ignacio J. Duran - 2018 - Business Ethics: A European Review 27 (3):222-237.
    Even though the link between perceived corporate social responsibility fit and corporate reputation has received much attention from scholars, this tradition has ignored that the underpinnings of this association vary depending on the particular characteristics of each industry under study. To delve into this matter, we investigate in the increasingly relevant context of controversial industries how PCSR-fit could enhance corporate reputation and which are the mediating mechanisms of this association. Our academic contribution is twofold. First, we find that controversial sectors (...)
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  2.  29
    Does It Really Pay to Be Good, Everywhere? A First Step to Understand the Corporate Social and Financial Performance Link in Latin American Controversial Industries.Pablo Rodrigo, Ignacio J. Duran & Daniel Arenas - 2016 - Business Ethics: A European Review 25 (3):286-309.
    Most research studying the corporate social performance –corporate financial performance link has utilized developed country samples. Also, this literature has generally focused on a wide variety of industries, ignoring the fact that certain sectors – such as controversial industries – have graver social and environmental issues. Hence, a gap exists in this tradition when it comes to emerging markets and controversial industries. This paper attempts to fill this void by providing preliminary evidence and insight on the matter. Based on an (...)
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  3.  81
    Do Employees Care About CSR Programs? A Typology of Employees According to Their Attitudes.Pablo Rodrigo & Daniel Arenas - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 83 (2):265-283.
    This paper examines employees’ reactions to Corporate Social Responsibility programs at the attitudinal level. The results presented are drawn from an in-depth study of two Chilean construction firms that have well-established CSR programs. Grounded theory was applied to the data prior to the construction of the conceptual framework. The analysis shows that the implementation of CSR programs generates two types of attitudes in employees: attitudes toward the organization and attitudes toward society. These two broad types of attitudes can then be (...)
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  4.  10
    Do Employees Value Strategic CSR? A Tale of Affective Organizational Commitment and its Underlying Mechanisms.Pablo Rodrigo, Claudio Aqueveque & Ignacio J. Duran - 2019 - Business Ethics: A European Review 28 (4):459-475.
    Business Ethics: A European Review, EarlyView.
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  5.  13
    Social Crises: Signatures of Complexity in a Fast-Growing Economy.Juan Pablo Cárdenas, Gerardo Vidal, Carolina Urbina, Gastón Olivares, Pablo Rodrigo & Miguel Fuentes - 2018 - Complexity 2018:1-11.
    Social systems are always exposed to critical processes in which their organization, or part of it, is questioned by the society that demands solutions through different critical saliences. The traditional approach to such social crises has mainly focused on their anticipation and management, implying that the focus is on trying to deal with crises once they occur, rather than delving in their essential characteristics that seemingly depend on the adaptive nature of the system and the increase in its internal complexity. (...)
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  6.  23
    On Firms and the Next Generations: Difficulties and Possibilities for Business Ethics Inquiry.Daniel Arenas & Pablo Rodrigo - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 133 (1):165-178.
    Despite the centrality of the topic for the debate on sustainability, future generations have largely been ignored by business ethics. This neglect is in part due to the enormous philosophical challenges posed by the concepts of future generations and intergenerational duties. This article reviews some of these difficulties and defends that much clarity would be gained from making a distinction between future generations and the next generations. It also argues that the concept of next generations offers a better starting point (...)
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