Results for 'Pandemic'

1000+ found
Order:
See also
  1.  76
    The Duty to Care in a Pandemic.Joint Centre for Bioethics Pandemic - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (8):31-33.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  2.  45
    Public Engagement on Social Distancing in a Pandemic: A Canadian Perspective.Joint Centre for Bioethics Pandemic - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (11):15-17.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  31
    The Duty to Care in a Pandemic.Joint Centre for Bioethics Pandemic Ethics Working Group - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (8):31 – 33.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  4. Pandemic Ethics: The Case for Risky Research.Richard Yetter Chappell & Peter Singer - 2020 - Research Ethics 16 (3-4):1-8.
    There is too much that we do not know about COVID-19. The longer we take to find it out, the more lives will be lost. In this paper, we will defend a principle of risk parity: if it is permissible to expose some members of society (e.g. health workers or the economically vulnerable) to a certain level of ex ante risk in order to minimize overall harm from the virus, then it is permissible to expose fully informed volunteers to a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  5. Pandemic Ethics: 8 Big Questions of COVID-19.Ben Bramble - 2020 - Sydney: Bartleby Books.
    A clear and provocative introduction to the ethics of COVID-19, suitable for university-level students, academics, and policymakers, as well as the general reader. It is also an original contribution to the emerging literature on this important topic. The author has made it available Open Access, so that it can be downloaded and read for free by all those who are interested in these issues. Key features include: -/- A neat organisation of the ethical issues raised by the pandemic. An (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  6.  23
    Public Engagement on Social Distancing in a Pandemic: A Canadian Perspective.Joint Centre for Bioethics Pandemic Ethics Working Group - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (11):15-17.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  98
    Pandemic Response: A Reflection on Disease and Education.Kevin J. Harrelson - 2022 - The Pluralist 17 (2):13-17.
    The global pandemic caused by the spread of a novel coronavirus in early 2020 did more than transform the first one-and-a-quarter academic year that fell within its duration. It also transformed higher learning in its research and pedagogy. Like many misfortunes, COVID-19 has brought opportunity for growth and change. No doubt, there are many success stories of philosophers rising to the challenges of our time. In this contribution, I relate my own pandemic story, not as one of success, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Ethics, Pandemics, and the Duty to Treat.Heidi Malm, Thomas May, Leslie P. Francis, Saad B. Omer, Daniel A. Salmon & Robert Hood - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (8):4 – 19.
    Numerous grounds have been offered for the view that healthcare workers have a duty to treat, including expressed consent, implied consent, special training, reciprocity (also called the social contract view), and professional oaths and codes. Quite often, however, these grounds are simply asserted without being adequately defended or without the defenses being critically evaluated. This essay aims to help remedy that problem by providing a critical examination of the strengths and weaknesses of each of these five grounds for asserting that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   41 citations  
  9.  38
    Pandemic Medical Ethics.Jennifer Blumenthal-Barby, Kenneth Boyd, Brian D. Earp, Lucy Frith, Rosalind J. McDougall, John McMillan & Jesse Wall - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (6):353-354.
    The COVID-19 pandemic will generate vexing ethical issues for the foreseeable future and many journals will be open to content that is relevant to our collective effort to meet this challenge. While the pandemic is clearly the critical issue of the moment, it’s important that other issues in medical ethics continue to be addressed as well. As can be seen in this issue, the Journal of Medical Ethics will uphold its commitment to publishing high quality papers on the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  10. Utilitarianism and the Pandemic.Julian Savulescu, Ingmar Persson & Dominic Wilkinson - 2020 - Bioethics 34 (6):620-632.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  11. Pandemic Ethics and Status Quo Risk.Richard Yetter Chappell - 2022 - Public Health Ethics 15 (1):64-73.
    Conservative assumptions in medical ethics risk immense harms during a pandemic. Public health institutions and public discourse alike have repeatedly privileged inaction over aggressive medical interventions to address the pandemic, perversely increasing population-wide risks while claiming to be guided by ‘caution’. This puzzling disconnect between rhetoric and reality is suggestive of an underlying philosophical confusion. In this paper, I argue that we have been misled by status quo bias—exaggerating the moral significance of the risks inherent in medical interventions, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  11
    Pandemic Leadership: Sex Differences and Their Evolutionary–Developmental Origins.Severi Luoto & Marco Antonio Correa Varella - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    The COVID-19 pandemic has caused a global societal, economic, and social upheaval unseen in living memory. There have been substantial cross-national differences in the kinds of policies implemented by political decision-makers to prevent the spread of the virus, to test the population, and to manage infected patients. Among other factors, these policies vary with politicians’ sex: early findings indicate that, on average, female leaders seem more focused on minimizing direct human suffering caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus, while male leaders (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  13.  29
    On Pandemics and the Duty to Care: Whose Duty? Who Cares?Carly Ruderman, C. Shawn Tracy, Cécile M. Bensimon, Mark Bernstein, Laura Hawryluck, Randi Z. Shaul & Ross E. G. Upshur - 2006 - BMC Medical Ethics 7 (1):5.
    BackgroundAs a number of commentators have noted, SARS exposed the vulnerabilities of our health care systems and governance structures. Health care professionals and hospital systems that bore the brunt of the SARS outbreak continue to struggle with the aftermath of the crisis. Indeed, HCPs – both in clinical care and in public health – were severely tested by SARS. Unprecedented demands were placed on their skills and expertise, and their personal commitment to their profession was severely tried. Many were exposed (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  14.  17
    Pandemic Prioritarianism.Lasse Nielsen - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (4):236-239.
    Prioritarianism pertains to the generic idea that it matters more to benefit people, the worse off they are, and while prioritarianism is not uncontroversial, it is considered a generally plausible and widely shared distributive principle often applied to healthcare prioritisation. In this paper, I identify social justice prioritarianism, severity prioritarianism and age-weighted prioritarianism as three different interpretations of the general prioritarian idea and discuss them in light of the effect of pandemic consequences on healthcare priority setting. On this analysis, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  15.  42
    Pandemic Influenza Preparedness: An Ethical Framework to Guide Decision-Making. [REVIEW]Alison Thompson, Karen Faith, Jennifer Gibson & Ross Upshur - 2006 - BMC Medical Ethics 7 (1):1-11.
    Background Planning for the next pandemic influenza outbreak is underway in hospitals across the world. The global SARS experience has taught us that ethical frameworks to guide decision-making may help to reduce collateral damage and increase trust and solidarity within and between health care organisations. Good pandemic planning requires reflection on values because science alone cannot tell us how to prepare for a public health crisis. Discussion In this paper, we present an ethical framework for pandemic influenza (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   38 citations  
  16.  48
    On Pandemics and the Duty to Care: Whose Duty? Who Cares? [REVIEW]Carly Ruderman, C. Tracy, Cécile Bensimon, Mark Bernstein, Laura Hawryluck, Randi Zlotnik Shaul & Ross Upshur - 2006 - BMC Medical Ethics 7 (1):1-6.
    Background As a number of commentators have noted, SARS exposed the vulnerabilities of our health care systems and governance structures. Health care professionals (HCPs) and hospital systems that bore the brunt of the SARS outbreak continue to struggle with the aftermath of the crisis. Indeed, HCPs – both in clinical care and in public health – were severely tested by SARS. Unprecedented demands were placed on their skills and expertise, and their personal commitment to their profession was severely tried. Many (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  17.  14
    Pandemic Surveillance and Racialized Subpopulations: Mitigating Vulnerabilities in COVID-19 Apps.Tereza Hendl, Ryoa Chung & Verina Wild - 2020 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 17 (4):829-834.
    Debates about effective responses to the COVID-19 pandemic have emphasized the paramount importance of digital tracing technology in suppressing the disease. So far, discussions about the ethics of this technology have focused on privacy concerns, efficacy, and uptake. However, important issues regarding power imbalances and vulnerability also warrant attention. As demonstrated in other forms of digital surveillance, vulnerable subpopulations pay a higher price for surveillance measures. There is reason to worry that some types of COVID-19 technology might lead to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  18.  7
    Politicizing the Pandemic: A Schemata Analysis of COVID-19 News in Two Selected Newspapers.Ali Haif Abbas - 2022 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 35 (3):883-902.
    This article critically studies coronavirus pandemic news in the press. The article attempts to study the way the news of COVID-19 is used for political and ideological purposes. In order to achieve the aim, two newspapers namely, The New York Times from the United States of America and Global Times from China are selected. Van Dijk’s news schemata framework is used for the analysis of the reports selected from the two newspapers. Van Dijk’s news schemata is crucial for the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  19.  13
    When Pandemic Hits: Exercise Frequency and Subjective Well-Being During COVID-19 Pandemic.Ralf Brand, Sinika Timme & Sanaz Nosrat - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  20. The Pandemic Dilemma: When Philosophy Conflicts with Public Health.Dien Ho - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (1):1-3.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  45
    Principlist Pandemics: On Fraud Ethical Guidelines and the Importance of Transparency.Jonathan Lewis & Udo Schuklenk - 2022 - In Michael Boylan (ed.), Ethical Public Health Policy Within Pandemics: Theory and Practice in Ethical Pandemic Administration. Cham: Springer. pp. 131-148.
    The COVID-19 pandemic has coincided with the proliferation of ethical guidance documents to assist public health authorities, health care providers, practitioners and staff with responding to ethical challenges posed by the pandemic. Like ethical guidelines relating to infectious disease that have preceded them, what unites many COVID-19 guidance documents is their dependency on an under-developed approach to bioethical principlism, a normative framework that attempts to guide actions based on a list of prima facie, unranked ethical principles. By situating (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  28
    Pandemic Preparedness and Cooperative Justice.Cristian Timmermann - 2021 - Developing World Bioethics 21 (4):201-210.
    By examining the global public good nature of pandemic preparedness we can identify key social justice issues that need to be confronted to increase citizens’ voluntary compliance with prevention and mitigation measures. As people tend to cooperate on a voluntary basis only with systems they consider fair, it becomes difficult to ensure compliance with public health measures in a context of extreme inequality. Among the major inequalities that need to be addressed we can find major differences in the extensiveness (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  23.  33
    Pandemic Ventilator Rationing and Appeals Processes.Daniel Patrone & David Resnik - 2011 - Health Care Analysis 19 (2):165-179.
    In a severe influenza pandemic, hospitals will likely experience serious and widespread shortages of patient pulmonary ventilators and of staff qualified to operate them. Deciding who will receive access to mechanical ventilation will often determine who lives and who dies. This prospect raises an important question whether pandemic preparedness plans should include some process by which individuals affected by ventilator rationing would have the opportunity to appeal adverse decisions. However, the issue of appeals processes to ventilator rationing decisions (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  24.  31
    COVID-19 Pandemic: A Litmus Test of Trust in the Health System.Vijayaprasad Gopichandran, Sudharshini Subramaniam & Maria Jusler Kalsingh - 2020 - Asian Bioethics Review 12 (2):213-221.
    The pandemic caused by the SARS-CoV2 novel coronavirus is creating a global crisis. There is a global ambience of uncertainty and anxiety. In addition, nations have imposed strict and restrictive public health measures including lockdowns. In this heightened time of vulnerability, public cooperation to preventive measures depends on trust and confidence in the health system. Trust is the optimistic acceptance of the vulnerability in the belief that the health system has best intentions. On the other hand, confidence is assessed (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  25.  5
    Pandemic Triage Criteria by COVID-19: Multiple approaches.Veronica Luzuriaga, Gabriela Rueda, Josue Quiroga, Gitti Montesdeoca & Jose Calahorrano - 2022 - Minerva 3 (7):25-36.
    This paper presents the most relevant criteria considered in the face of a lack of resources and medical infrastructure to prioritize the treatment of patients affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. From a systematic review, points of view have been collected considering the medical and social fields. Multiple divergences were found in these views depending on the countries, resources, religious approaches, and political aspects that have been adapted according to the circumstances of each nation. Keywords: Triage, COVID-19, public health.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  1
    Pandemic Racism – and the Nursing Response.Sally Thorne - 2020 - Nursing Inquiry 27 (3).
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  27.  15
    Pandemic Influenza: Public Health Preparedness for the Next Global Health Emergency.Lawrence O. Gostin - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (4):565-573.
    The threat posed by avian influenza appears to be rising, yet global and national health programs are preparing only fitfully. A lethal form of avian flu has rooted itself deeply into the poultry flocks of poor Asian countries that will have a hard time eradicating it. Every so often a sick bird infects a human, who usually dies from the encounter, and on rare occasions the virus seems to have spread from one person to another before the chain of infection (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  28.  23
    Pandemic Influenza: Public Health Preparedness for the Next Global Health Emergency.Lawrence O. Gostin - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (4):565-573.
    The threat posed by avian influenza appears to be rising, yet global and national health programs are preparing only fitfully. A lethal form of avian flu has rooted itself deeply into the poultry flocks of poor Asian countries that will have a hard time eradicating it. Every so often a sick bird infects a human, who usually dies from the encounter, and on rare occasions the virus seems to have spread from one person to another before the chain of infection (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  29. Pandemics - Background Paper.Giovanni De Grandis & Jasper Littmann - 2011 - Forward Look Archive.
    The background paper provides an introduction to the concept of pandemics and to the ethical and political issues related with pandemic preparedness.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Three Ways in Which Pandemic Models May Perform a Pandemic.Philippe van Basshuysen, Lucie White, Donal Khosrowi & Mathias Frisch - 2021 - Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 14 (1):110-127.
    Models not only represent but may also influence their targets in important ways. While models’ abilities to influence outcomes has been studied in the context of economic models, often under the label ‘performativity’, we argue that this phenomenon also pertains to epidemiological models, such as those used for forecasting the trajectory of the Covid-19 pandemic. After identifying three ways in which a model by the Covid-19 Response Team at Imperial College London may have influenced scientific advice, policy, and individual (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  31.  7
    Pandemic Dreams: Network Analysis of Dream Content During the COVID-19 Lockdown.Anu-Katriina Pesonen, Jari Lipsanen, Risto Halonen, Marko Elovainio, Nils Sandman, Juha-Matti Mäkelä, Minea Antila, Deni Béchard, Hanna M. Ollila & Liisa Kuula - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  32. The Covid-19 Pandemic and the Bounds of Grief.Louise Richardson, Matthew Ratcliffe, Becky Millar & Eleanor Byrne - 2021 - Think 20 (57):89-101.
    ABSTRACTThis article addresses the question of whether certain experiences that originate in causes other than bereavement are properly termed ‘grief’. To do so, we focus on widespread experiences of grief that have been reported during the Covid-19 pandemic. We consider two potential objections to a more permissive use of the term: grief is, by definition, a response to a death; grief is subject to certain norms that apply only to the case of bereavement. Having shown that these objections are (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  33.  24
    Pandemic Vaccine Trials: Expedite, but Don’T Rush.Angus Dawson - 2020 - Research Ethics 16 (3-4):1-12.
    It has been proposed that the urgency of having a vaccine as a response to SARS-CoV-2 is so great, given the potential health, economic and social benefits that we should override the established s...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  34.  29
    Pandemic Management and Developing World Bioethics: Bird Flu in West Bengal.Chhanda Chakraborti - 2009 - Developing World Bioethics 9 (3):161-166.
    This paper examines the case of a recent H5N1virus (avian influenza) outbreak in West Bengal, an eastern state of India, and argues that poorly executed pandemic management may be viewed as a moral lapse. It further argues that pandemic management initiatives are intimately related to the concept of health as a social 'good' and to the moral responsibility of protection from foreseeable social harm from an infectious disease. The initiatives, therefore, have to be guided by special moral obligations (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  35.  44
    The COVID-19 Pandemic: Healthcare Crisis Leadership as Ethics Communication.Matti Häyry - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (1):42-50.
    Governmental reactions to crises like the COVID-19 pandemic can be seen as ethics communication. Governments can contain the disease and thereby mitigate the detrimental public health impact; allow the virus to spread to reach herd immunity; test, track, isolate, and treat; and suppress the disease regionally. An observation of Sweden and Finland showed a difference in feasible ways to communicate the chosen policy to the citizenry. Sweden assumed the herd immunity strategy and backed it up with health utilitarian arguments. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  36.  15
    Rationing in a Pandemic: Lessons From Italy.Lucia Craxì, Marco Vergano, Julian Savulescu & Dominic Wilkinson - 2020 - Asian Bioethics Review 12 (3):325-330.
    In late February and early March 2020, Italy became the European epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic. Despite increasingly stringent containment measures enforced by the government, the health system faced an enormous pressure, and extraordinary efforts were made in order to increase overall hospital beds’ availability and especially ICU capacity. Nevertheless, the hardest-hit hospitals in Northern Italy experienced a shortage of ICU beds and resources that led to hard allocating choices. At the beginning of March 2020, the Italian Society of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  37. Privacy During the Pandemic and Beyond.Carissa Vèliz - 2020 - The Philosophers' Magazine 90:107-113.
    This paper is an overview about the state of privacy and power shifts during the pandemic, and the privacy challenges ahead.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  38.  1
    Pandemic, Quarantine, and Psychological Time.Simon Grondin, Esteban Mendoza-Duran & Pier-Alexandre Rioux - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  39.  37
    Preparing for an Influenza Pandemic: Ethical Issues.Jaro Kotalik - 2005 - Bioethics 19 (4):422–431.
    In the near future, experts predict, an influenza pandemic will likely spread throughout the world. Many countries have been creating a contingency plan in order to mitigate the severe health and social consequences of such an event. Examination of the pandemic plans of Canada, the United Kingdom and the United States, from an ethical perspective, raises several concerns. One: scarcity of human and material resources is assumed to be severe. Plans focus on prioritization but do not identify resources (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  40.  5
    A Pandemic Refocuses Bioethics on “The Big Questions”.Brian M. Cummings & John J. Paris - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (12):51-54.
    To paraphrase Lewis Carroll’s poem “The Walrus and the Carpenter” from his Through the Looking Glass, “The time has come to talk of many things.” Not as the Walrus did in the nursery rhyme, “of sho...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  41.  7
    Pandemics, Protocols, and the Plague of Athens: Insights From Thucydides.Joseph J. Fins - 2020 - Hastings Center Report 50 (3):50-53.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  42.  4
    The Pandemic: Lessons for Bioethics?Gilbert Meilaender - 2020 - Hastings Center Report 50 (3):7-8.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  43. Pandemic Transformative Experience.Ian James Kidd & Havi Carel - forthcoming - The Philosophers’ Magazine.
    We argue that pandemic and lockdown can be usefully interpreted as transformative experiences, albeit of a sort with interestingly different features to those discussed by L.A. Paul.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  76
    Following the Science: Pandemic Policy Making and Reasonable Worst-Case Scenarios.Richard Bradley & Joe Roussos - 2021 - LSE Public Policy Review 1 (4):6.
    The UK has been ‘following the science’ in response to the COVID-19 pandemic in line with the national framework for the use of scientific advice in assessment of risk. We argue that the way in which it does so is unsatisfactory in two important respects. Firstly, pandemic policy making is not based on a comprehensive assessment of policy impacts. And secondly, the focus on reasonable worst-case scenarios as a way of managing uncertainty results in a loss of decision-relevant (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45.  5
    Pandemic Stories: Rhetorical Motifs in Journalists’ Coverage of Biomedical Risk.Tess Laidlaw - 2019 - Minerva 57 (4):433-451.
    This paper argues that journalists’ discursive actions in an outbreak context manifest in identifiable rhetorical motifs, which in turn influence the delivery of biomedical information by the media in such a context. Via a critical approach grounded in rhetorical theory, I identified three distinct rhetorical motifs influencing the reportage of health information in the early days of the H1N1 outbreak. A public-health motif was exhibited in texts featuring a particular health official and offering the statements of such an official as (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  24
    The COVID-19 Pandemic: A Month of Bioethics in Finland.Matti Häyry - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (1):114-122.
    The role of bioethicists amidst crises like the COVID-19 pandemic is not well defined. As professionals in the field, they should respond, but how? The observation of the early days of pandemic confinement in Finland showed that moral philosophers with limited experience in bioethics tended to apply their favorite theories to public decisions, with varying results. Medical ethicists were more likely to lend support to the public authorities by soothing or descriptive accounts of the solutions assumed. These are (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  47.  8
    A Post-Truth Pandemic?Taylor Shelton - 2020 - Big Data and Society 7 (2).
    As the coronavirus pandemic continues apace in the United States, the dizzying amount of data being generated, analyzed and consumed about the virus has led to calls to proclaim this the first ‘data-driven pandemic’. But at the same time, it seems that this plethora of data has not meant a better grasp on the reality of the pandemic and its effects. Even as we have the potential to digitally track and trace nearly every single individual who has (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  48.  16
    Digital Surveillance in a Pandemic Response: What Bioethics Ought to Learn From Indigenous Perspectives.Tereza Hendl & Tiara Roxanne - 2022 - Bioethics 36 (3):305-312.
    Bioethics, Volume 36, Issue 3, Page 305-312, March 2022.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  49.  37
    Black Lives in a Pandemic: Implications of Systemic Injustice for End‐of‐Life Care.Alan Elbaum - 2020 - Hastings Center Report 50 (3):58-60.
    In recent months, Covid‐19 has devastated African American communities across the nation, and a Minneapolis police officer murdered George Floyd. The agents of death may be novel, but the phenomena of long‐standing epidemics of premature black death and of police violence are not. This essay argues that racial health and health care disparities, rooted as they are in systemic injustice, ought to carry far more weight in clinical ethics than they generally do. In particular, this essay examines palliative and end‐of‐life (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  50. Pandemic Reminders as Psychological Threat: Thinking About COVID-19 Lowers Coping Self-Efficacy Among Trauma-Exposed Adults.McKenzie Lockett, Tom Pyszczynski & Sander L. Koole - 2022 - Cognition and Emotion 36 (1):23-30.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 1000