Results for 'Paralogism'

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  1.  16
    Derrida’s Paralogism of Writing: A Critique of Deconstructive Reasoning.Peter Bornedal - 2015 - The European Legacy 20 (7):699-714.
    This article is a critique of the flawed logic Derrida employed in articulating his program of a Grammatology for “deconstructing” Western philosophy. I argue that Derrida in several instances built his arguments around what Kant called the “paralogism.” I look at an often cited case in order to substantiate my claim: Derrida’s reading of Saussure, where his argument is based on a paralogism. Derrida misinterprets Saussure by seeing his alleged rejection of graphical writing as a rejection of his (...)
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  2. Kant's First Paralogism.Ian Proops - 2010 - Philosophical Review 119 (4):449–495.
    In “The Paralogisms of Pure Reason” Kant seeks to explain how rationalist philosophers could have arrived at the dogmatic conclusion that the self is a substance. His diagnosis has two components: first, the positing of “Transcendental Illusion”—a pervasive intellectual illusion that predisposes us to accept as sound certain unsound arguments for substantive theses about the nature of the self; second, the identification of the relevant fallacy we commit when we succumb to this illusion. This paper explains how these two elements (...)
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  3. The Aeneas Argument: Personality and Immortality in Kant's Third Paralogism.Corey W. Dyck - 2010 - Kant Yearbook 2 (1):95-122.
    In this paper, I challenge the assumption that Kant’s Third Paralogism has to do, first and foremost, with the question of personal identity.
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  4.  15
    Mental Powers and the Soul in Kant’s Subjective Deduction and the Second Paralogism.Steven Tester - 2016 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 46 (3):426-452.
    Kant’s claim in the Subjective Deduction that we have multiple fundamental mental powers appears to be susceptible to some a priori metaphysical arguments made against multiple fundamental mental powers by Christian Wolff who held that these powers would violate the unity of thought and entail that the soul is an extended composite. I argue, however, that in the Second Paralogism and his lectures on metaphysics, Kant provides arguments that overcome these objections by showing that it is possible that a (...)
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  5. Kant's Refutation of Idealism and Fourth Paralogism: A Response to Vogel.John Davenport - manuscript
    I will discuss Kant 's arguments in these section in three parts. In Part I, I will try to show how we can make sense of the obviously close relations in theme and content between the Refutation of Idealism and the two version of the Fourth Paralogism, as well as the second Postulate of Empirical Thought. This will serve as a kind of introduction, since on a cursory first reading, the connections might be far from apparent. In the process, (...)
     
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  6.  74
    Fundamental Singleness: How to Turn the 2nd Paralogism Into a Valid Argument.Galen Strawson - 2010 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 85 (67):61-92.
    [1] Experience (i.e. conscious experience) is a real concrete phenomenon. The existence of experience entails the existence of a subject of experience. Therefore subjects of experience are concretely real (or at least one is). [2] The existence of a subject of experience in the lived present or living moment of experience, e.g. the period of time in which the grasping of a thought occurs, provably involves the existence of singleness or unity of an unsurpassably strong kind. The singleness or unity (...)
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  7.  15
    Kant's Paralogism of Personhood.James G. Anderson - 1980 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 10:73-86.
    Jonathan Bennett's two interpretations of Kant's Third Paralogism are shown to be inadequate. The Third Paralogism attempts to show that rational psychology provides an inadequate basis for the application of the concepts of "personhood" and "substance". The criteria for the application of "personhood" and "substance" must be empirical, and in the case of "personhood" they are bodily criteria. These criteria are available to each of us but only upon pains of abandoning what Bennett calls the Cartesian basis, i.e. (...)
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  8.  6
    Critical Idealism and Transcendental Materialism: A Speculative Analysis of the Second Paralogism.Michael J. Olson - 2011 - Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 7 (1):49-61.
    his paper argues that the critical doctrine of the necessary unity of the thinking subject propounded in Kant’s Second Paralogism contains an idealist commitment to the metaphysically exceptional nature of the unifying activity of thought. Rather than rejecting Kant’s transcendental framework as necessarily idealist and antagonistic to the current projects of speculative materialism, it is argued that transcendental philosophy should remain an important ingredient of any contemporary metaphysics. The implicit metaphysical idealism of Kantian critical idealism, it is claimed, in (...)
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  9. Kant's Paralogism of Personhood.James G. Anderson - 1980 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 10:73-86.
    Jonathan Bennett's two interpretations of Kant's Third Paralogism are shown to be inadequate. The Third Paralogism attempts to show that rational psychology provides an inadequate basis for the application of the concepts of "personhood" and "substance". The criteria for the application of "personhood" and "substance" must be empirical, and in the case of "personhood" they are bodily criteria. These criteria are available to each of us but only upon pains of abandoning what Bennett calls the Cartesian basis, i.e. (...)
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  10. Fundamental Singleness: How to Turn the 2nd Paralogism Into a Valid Argument: Galen Strawson.Galen Strawson - 2010 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 85 (67):61-92.
    [1] Experience is a real concrete phenomenon. The existence of experience entails the existence of a subject of experience. Therefore subjects of experience are concretely real. [2] The existence of a subject of experience in the lived present or living moment of experience, e.g. the period of time in which the grasping of a thought occurs, provably involves the existence of singleness or unity of an unsurpassably strong kind. The singleness or unity in question is a metaphysically real, concrete entity. (...)
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  11. Kant's Fourth Paralogism.C. Thomas Powell - 1988 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 48 (3):389-414.
  12.  30
    Illusion and Fallacy in Kant's First Paralogism.Michelle Grier - 1993 - Kant-Studien 84 (3):257-282.
  13. Ontological Destruction of Kantian Criticism in Rational Psychology Paralogism.Michel Henry - 2009 - Studia Phaenomenologica 9:17-53.
  14.  18
    Kant's Analysis of the Paralogism of Rational Psychology in Critique of Pure Reason Edition B.J. D. G. Evans - 1999 - Kantian Review 3 (1):99-105.
    One third of the transcendental dialectic in Kant's Critique of Pure Reason is devoted to demolishing the pseudo-science of rational psychology. In this part of his work Kant attacks the idea that there is an ultimate subject of experience — the ‘I’ or Self — which can only be investigated and understood intellectually. The belief that such a study is possible is natural to human reason; but it is based on demonstrable error. Kant tries to exorcize our minds from falling (...)
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  15.  10
    Kant's Third Paralogism.R. I. G. Hughes - 1983 - Kant-Studien 74 (4):405-411.
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  16.  8
    Chisholm's Paralogism.William S. Robinson - 1979 - Philosophical Studies 36 (3):309 - 316.
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  17.  3
    Does 'Intentionality' Imply 'Being'? A Paralogism in Sartre's Ontology.Robert E. Butts - 1961 - Kant-Studien 52 (1-4):426-432.
  18. 3. The Antisceptical Argument of the Fourth Paralogism.Luigi Caranti - 2007 - In Kant and the Scandal of Philosophy: The Kantian Critique of Cartesian Scepticism. University of Toronto Press. pp. 80-113.
  19. Enigmatic Ambiguity in the Fourth Paralogism of Kant's 'Kritik der Reinen Vernunft'-A Fine Line Between Reality and Effectivity.J. J. Delfour - 1997 - Kant-Studien 88 (3):280-310.
  20. Kant's Third Paralogism.R. I. G. Hughes - 1983 - Société Française de Philosophie, Bulletin 74 (4):405.
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  21. Fundamental Singleness: How to Turn the 2nd Paralogism Into a Valid Argument.J. Strawson Galen - unknown
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  22. Fundamental Singleness: How to Turn the 2nd Paralogism Into a Valid Argument.Galen J. Strawson - unknown
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  23. Fundamental Singleness: How to Turn the 2nd Paralogism Into a Valid Argument.Galen J. Strawson - unknown
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  24. Fundamental Singleness: How to Turn the 2nd Paralogism Into a Valid Argument.Galen J. Strawson - unknown
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  25.  78
    The Role of Kant's Refutation of Idealism.Michael Hymers - 1991 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 29 (1):51-67.
    This paper argues that the Refutation of Idealism is a clear development of a line of thought expressed in the Transcendental Deduction and the Fourth Paralogism in the 1781-edition of the Critique of Pure Reason. This general line of thought is that the possibility of systematic delusion about the nature of the empirical world is ruled out, in part, by the fact that illusion presupposes a background of veridical perception.
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  26.  22
    Sergej N. Trubetskoj and the Concept of "Subject" in the History of Russian Thought.Nikolaj Plotnikov - 2009 - Studies in East European Thought 61 (2/3):197 - 208.
    The basic tendencies in the conceptual history of the 'subject' within Russian intellectual history are presented. This backgrounds a closer analysis of S. Trubetskoj's concept of 'conciliar consciousness', including the problems and aporiae connected with it. It will be shown that and how this conception depends on assumptions from prekantian metaphysics and therefore ignores the Kantian account of subjectivity.
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  27. Anonymus Aurelianensis II, Aristotle, Alexander, Porphyry and Boethius. Ancient Scholasticism and 12th-Century Western Europe.Sten Ebbesen - 1976 - Cahiers de l'Institut du Moyen-Âge Grec Et Latin 16:1-128.
  28. The Role of Kant's Refutation of Idealism.Ralf M. Bader - 2012 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 94 (1):53-73.
    This paper assesses the role of the Refutation of Idealism within the Critique of Pure Reason, as well as its relation to the treatment of idealism in the First Edition and to transcendental idealism more generally. It is argued that the Refutation is consistent with the Fourth Paralogism and that it can be considered as an extension of the Transcendental Deduction. While the Deduction, considered on its own, constitutes a 'regressive argument', the Refutation allows us to turn the Transcendental (...)
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  29.  38
    Heraclitean Critique of Kantian and Enlightenment Ethics Through the Fijian Ethos.Erman Kaplama - 2016 - Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 12 (1):143-165.
    Kant makes a much-unexpected confession in a much-unexpected place. In the Criticism of the third paralogism of transcendental psychology of the first Critique Kant accepts the irrefutability of the Heraclitean notion of universal becoming or the transitory nature of all things, admitting the impossibility of positing a totally persistent and self-conscious subject. The major Heraclitean doctrine of panta rhei makes it impossible to conduct philosophical inquiry by assuming a self-conscious subject or “I,” which would potentially be in constant motion (...)
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  30. Kant and McDowell on Skepticism and Disjunctivism.Tsung-Hsing Ho - 2013 - In Margit Ruffing, Claudio La Rocca, Alfredo Ferrarin & Stefano Bacin (eds.), Kant Und Die Philosophie in Weltburgerlicher Absicht: Akten Des XI. Kant-Kongresses 2010. De Gruyter. pp. 761-770.
    This paper is to propose a new form of Kant’s anti-skepticism argument in light of John McDowell’s works on disjunctivism. I first discuss recent debates between McDowell and Crispin Wright on disjunctivism. I argue that Wright wrongly downplays McDowell’s disjunctivism, whose metaphysical claim that our perceptual faculties directly engage in the world has an epistemological implication that should be able to dismiss the skeptic’s imagery as fictitious. However, McDowell does not clearly offer such an argument. I will show that we (...)
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  31. The Collision of Language and Metaphysics in the Search for Self-Identity: On Ahaṃkāra and Asmitā in Sāṃkhya-Yoga.Marzenna Jakubczak - 2011 - Argument: Biannual Philosophical Journal 1 (1):37-48.
    The author of this paper discusses some major points vital for two classical Indian schools of philosophy: (1) a significant feature of linguistic analysis in the Yoga tradition; (2) the role of the religious practice (iśvara-pranidhana) in the search for true self-identity in Samkhya and Yoga darśanas with special reference to their gnoseological purposes; and (3) some possible readings of ‘ahamkara’ and ‘asmita’ displayed in the context of Samkhya-Yoga phenomenology and metaphysics. The collision of language and metaphysics refers to the (...)
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  32. Kant's Theory of the Self.Arthur Melnick - 2008 - Routledge.
    The reality of the thinking subject -- The paralogisms and transcendental idealism -- The first paralogism -- The second paralogism -- Transcendental self-consciousness -- Other interpretations of the paralogisms -- Empirical apperception -- Pure apperception -- The person as subject -- Apperception and inner sense -- The third paralogism and Kant's conception of a person -- The embodied subject -- The fourth paralogism.
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  33.  40
    Kant on Personal Identity.John L. Mackie - 1980 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 10:87-90.
    Kant, in the third paralogism, needs to be rescued from his commentators. His argument that the identity of one's consciousness of oneself is no proof of the numerical identity of a soul-substance, since an indistinguishable identity of consciousness could result from one subject's handing over of memories to another, is sound and complete, and does not need the supplementations offered by Strawson, Bennett and James Anderson. But a possible supplementation is that this identity of consciousness calls for explanation and (...)
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  34.  22
    The Problem of Self-Constitution For Idealism and Phenomenology.Errol E. Harris - 1977 - Idealistic Studies 7 (1):1-27.
    Following kant, idealists establish the transcendental unity of the subject as the prior condition of experience of objects. this is necessarily all-inclusive and the finite self becomes one of its phenomena, which cannot be identified with the transcendental ego, nor yet be wholly divorced from it. this is the basis of kant's paralogism of reason. t h green, f h bradley and edmund husserl are all victims of this paralogism, each in his own way. green fails to avoid (...)
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  35.  57
    Kant and the Scandal of Philosophy. [REVIEW]Anthony K. Jensen - 2009 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (2):pp. 317-318.
    Luigi Caranti presents his readers three carefully articulated arguments in this estimable book. The first is that Kant's career-long engagement with Cartesian skepticism culminates in the first Critique's A-edition version of the Fourth Paralogism, rather than in the later Refutation of Idealism, as is more traditionally thought. The second argues that scholars must take Kant seriously when he asserts that transcendental idealism is the only possible refutation of skepticism, since it denies the possibility of the skeptical doubt arising in (...)
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  36.  4
    Why God Had to Have an Immaculate Mother.Edward Epsen - 2016 - New Blackfriars 97 (1071):560-574.
    Anselm's argument for the salvific necessity of the Incarnation in his Cur Deus Homo is justly famous and elegantly simple: only man ought; only God can; therefore, only a God-man both ought and can. Unfortunately it is a paralogism, trading on an equivocal use of ‘ought’. It is not difficult, however, to reconceive the meaning of the terms ‘ought’ and ‘can’ in a way that both renders the argument formally valid and deepens our christology. Sin may be conceived, per (...)
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  37. The Development of Kant's Refutation of Idealism.Luigi Caranti - 2001 - Dissertation, Boston University
    The dissertation analyzes Kant's arguments against Cartesian skepticism from the precritical period up to the "Reflexionen zum Idealismus" . It is argued that in the silent decade , the skeptical challenge leads Kant to reinterpret the foundation of his philosophy, namely, the distinction between appearances and things in themselves. Realizing the impossibility of refuting the skeptic through the identification of appearances with mental entities and the affirmation of the mind-independent existence of things in themselves as causes of the appearances , (...)
     
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  38. Kant and the Scandal of Philosophy: The Kantian Critique of Cartesian Scepticism. [REVIEW]Jensen Anthony - 2009 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 47:317-318.
    Luigi Caranti presents his readers three carefully articulated arguments in this estimable book. The first is that Kant's career-long engagement with Cartesian skepticism culminates in the first Critique's A-edition version of the Fourth Paralogism, rather than in the later Refutation of Idealism, as is more traditionally thought. The second argues that scholars must take Kant seriously when he asserts that transcendental idealism is the only possible refutation of skepticism, since it denies the possibility of the skeptical doubt arising in (...)
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  39. Kant on Personal Identity.John L. Mackie - 1980 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 10:87-90.
    Kant, in the third paralogism, needs to be rescued from his commentators. His argument that the identity of one's consciousness of oneself is no proof of the numerical identity of a soul-substance, since an indistinguishable identity of consciousness could result from one subject's handing over of memories to another, is sound and complete, and does not need the supplementations offered by Strawson, Bennett and James Anderson. But a possible supplementation is that this identity of consciousness calls for explanation and (...)
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  40. Kant's Epistemic Self.Charles Thomas Powell - 1986 - Dissertation, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    In the Paralogisms of the Critique of Pure Reason, Kant challenges the possibility of a priori knowledge of the self. Implicit in this attack is a positive theory of mind which is comprehensible only through a reading of the Transcendental Deduction. There Kant argues that the possibility of experience requires that experience be represented as had by a Cartesian Ego, since only the representation of such a unitary subject can provide the necessary framework for representing a coherent course of experiences. (...)
     
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  41.  72
    Kant and the Philosophy of Mind: Perception, Reason, and the Self.Andrew Stephenson & Anil Gomes (eds.) - forthcoming - Oxford University Press.
    Contents: 0. Introduction Anil Gomes and Andrew Stephenson 1. Kant, The Philosophy Of Mind, And Twentieth Century Analytic Philosophy Anil Gomes 2. Synthesis And Binding Lucy Allais 3. Understanding Non-Conceptual Representation Of Objects: Empirical Models Of Sensibility’s Operation Katherine Dunlop 4. Are Kantian Intuitions Object-Dependent? Stefanie Grüne 5. Intuition And Presence Colin McLear 6. Imagination And Inner Intuition Andrew Stephenson 7. Inner Sense And Time Ralf M. Bader 8. Can’t Kant Cognize Himself? Or, A Problem For (Almost) Every Interpretation Of (...)
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  42. O stosowalności niektórych modalnych reguł inferencji w rozumowaniach pozalogicznych.Kordula Świętorzecka - 2002 - Filozofia Nauki 1.
    The presented paper takes up the attempt to analyse and specify the suspicion that some modal rules of inference are paralogical in application to non-logical reasonings (s.c. modal fallacy). The considerations have been limited to modal prepositional calculi: K and S5, which are intended to be a formal base of these non-logical reasonings - proofs of so called specific thesis on the grounds of the particular specific theories. Pointing out the properties of being permitted, being valid and being derivable in (...)
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