Results for 'Passion'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  38
    Work Motivations, Work Outcomes, and Health: Passion Versus Addiction.Ronald J. Burke & Lisa Fiksenbaum - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 84 (S2):257-263.
    Individuals in managerial and professional jobs now work long hours for a variety of reasons. Building on previous research on workaholism and on types of passion, the results of three exploratory studies of correlates of work-based Passion and Addiction are presented. Data were collected in three samples using anonymously completed questionnaires: Canadian managers and professionals, Australian psychologists, and Norwegian journalists. A common pattern of findings was observed in the three samples. First, respondents scoring higher on Passion and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  17
    A Politics of Passion in Education: The Foucauldian Legacy.Michalinos Zembylas - 2007 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 39 (2):135–149.
    Prompted by what is seen as a missing analysis in the discussions about passion and affect in education, this essay attempts to clarify and provide a context for understanding the contribution of Foucault in the discourse of passion. In particular, the author traces the politics of passion in Foucault's work. A ‘politics of passion’ is the analysis that challenges the cultural and historical emotional rules with respect to what passion is, how it is expressed, who (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  3.  15
    ‘The Passion of Israel’: The True Israel According to Levinas, or Judaism ‘as a Category of Being’.Michael Fagenblat - 2015 - Sophia 54 (3):297-320.
    Across four decades of writing, Levinas repeatedly referred to the Holocaust as ‘the Passion of Israel at Auschwitz’. This deliberately Christological interpretation of the Holocaust raises questions about the respective roles of Judaism and Christianity in Levinas’ thought and seems at odds with his well-known view that suffering is ‘useless’. Basing my interpretation on the journals Levinas wrote as a prisoner of war and a radio talk he delivered in September 1945, I argue that his philosophical project is best (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  17
    Wittgenstein, Religious “Passion,” and Fundamentalism.Bob Plant - 2013 - Journal of Religious Ethics 41 (2):280-309.
    Notwithstanding his own spiritual inadequacies, Wittgenstein has a profound respect for those capable of living a genuinely religious life; namely, those whose “passionate,” “loving” faith demands unconditional existential commitment. In contrast, he disapproves of those who see religious belief as hypothetical, reasonable, or dependent on empirical evidence. Drawing primarily on Culture and Value, “Lectures on Religious Belief,” and On Certainty, in this essay I defend two claims: (1) that there is an unresolved tension between Wittgenstein's later descriptive-therapeutic approach and the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  16
    Humility and Passion: A Caitanyite Vaishnava Ethics of Devotion.Graham M. Schweig - 2002 - Journal of Religious Ethics 30 (3):421 - 444.
    Two axiological elements--humility and passion--I argue, are at the ethical core of Bengal Vaishnavism. These modes of behavior, derived from early theological sources, are dialectically related and form the basis for an ethics of devotion that allows the devotee to accept, while simultaneously transcending social norms and identities. I draw primarily from what is considered the most honored story of the "Bhāgavata Purāṇa", the Rāsalīlā, involving the cowherd maidens who exhibit the highest devotion to God, and from the "Caitanya (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  9
    Place and Subjectivity in Contemporary World: An Analysis of Lost in Translation Based on the Semiotics of Passion.Pamela Flores - 2013 - Semiotica 2013 (193):175-193.
    This article develops a characterization of the postmodern subject having as pre-text the film Lost in Translation by Sofia Coppola. To accomplish this goal, the essay links the semiotics of passion and the role of discursive manifestation in the construction of place through the recognition of the “sensitive body” while creating a cinematic experience. This experience transforms the urban space in a lived city and makes possible the encounter with the other and with the self. During the passional journey, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  55
    Socrates on Reason, Appetite and Passion: A Response to Thomas C. Brickhouse and Nicholas D. Smith, Socratic Moral Psychology. [REVIEW]Christopher Rowe - 2012 - Journal of Ethics 16 (3):305-324.
    Section 1 of this essay distinguishes between four interpretations of Socratic intellectualism, which are, very roughly: a version in which on any given occasion desire, and then action, is determined by what we think will turn out best for us, that being what we all, always, really desire; a version in which on any given occasion action is determined by what we think will best satisfy our permanent desire for what is really best for us; a version formed by the (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. The Realistic Actualization of the Moist Passion for Salvation and Its Historical Destination.Ding Weixiang - 2013 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 8 (2):309-331.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Passion and Politics.Michael Walzer - 2002 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 28 (6):617-633.
    Passion is a hidden issue behind or at the heart of, contemporary theoretical debates about nationalism, identity politics and religious fundamentalism. It is not that reason and passion cannot be conceptually distinguished. They are, however, always entangled in practice - and this entanglement itself requires a conceptual account. So it is my ambition to blur the line between reason and passion: to rationalize (some of) the passions and to impassion reason. Passionate intensity has a legitimate place in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  10. Not Passion's Slave: Emotions and Choice.Robert C. Solomon - 2003 - Oxford University Press.
    Not Passion's Slave is a collection of Solomon's most significant essay-length publications on the nature of emotions over the past twenty-five years. He develops two essential themes throughout the volume: firstly, he presents a "cognitive" theory of emotions in which emotions are construed primarily as evaluative judgments; secondly, he proposes an "existentialist" perspective in which he defends the idea that we are responsible for our emotions and, in a limited sense, "choose" them. The final section presents his current philosophical (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   16 citations  
  11. Passion and Action: The Emotions in Seventeenth-Century Philosophy.Susan James - 1997 - Oxford University Press.
    Passion and Action is an exploration of the role of the passions in seventeenth-century thought. Susan James offers fresh readings of a broad range of thinkers, including such canonical figures as Hobbes, Descartes, Malebranche, Spinoza, Pascal, and Locke, and shows that a full understanding of their philosophies must take account of their interpretations of our affective life. This ground-breaking study throws new light upon the shaping of our ideas about the mind, knowledge, and action, and provides a historical context (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   17 citations  
  12.  1
    Remythologizing Theology: Divine Action, Passion, and Authorship.Kevin J. Vanhoozer - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Preface; Introduction: what is remythologizing?; Part I. 'God' in Scripture and Theology: 1. Biblical representation (Vorstellung): divine communicative action and passion; 2. Theological conceptualization (Begriff): varieties of theism and panentheism; 3. The new kenotic-perichoretic relational ontotheology: some 'classical' concerns; Part II. Communicative Theism and the Triune God: 4. God's being is in communicating; 5. God in three persons: the one who lights and lives in love; Part III. God and World: Authorial Action and Interaction: 6. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  13. Passion in Theory: Conceptions of Freud and Lacan.Robin Ferrell - 1996 - Routledge.
    Philosophy had either ignored or attacked psychoanalysis: such responses are neither warranted nor helpful. One hundred years after its inception, isn't it time to find out what psychoanalysis has to offer us? In Passion in Theory Robyn Ferrell does just that, and returns with some surprising answers. Concentrating on the work of Freud and Lacan, Robyn Ferrell asks why their work had been so influential in European philosophy yet so marginal in the Anglo-American circles. Passion in Theory explores (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  14. Critical Reflections on Mel Gibson's The Passion of the Christ.Rhonda Hammer & Douglas Kellner - unknown
    The February 2004 release of Mel Gibson’s The Passion of the Christ is a major cultural event. Receiving a tremendous amount of advance publicity due to claims of its anti-Semitism and adulatory responses by conservative Christians who were the first to see it, the film achieved more buzz before its release than any recent film in our memory.1 Gibson himself helped orchestrate the publicity with selective showings of The Passion and strategic appearances on TV shows where he came (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  19
    Passion and Reason: Aristotelian Strategies in Kierkegaard's Ethics.Norman Lillegard - 2002 - Journal of Religious Ethics 30 (2):251 - 273.
    Both Aristotle and Kierkegaard show that virtues result, in part, from training which produces distinctive patterns of salience. The "frame problem" in AI shows that rationality requires salience. Salience is a function of cares and desires (passions) and thus governs choice in much the way Aristotle supposes when he describes choice as deliberative desire. Since rationality requires salience it follows that rationality requires passion. Thus Kierkegaard is no more an irrationalist in ethics than is Aristotle, though he continues to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  16.  3
    Not Passion's Slave.Nico H. Frijda - 2010 - Emotion Review 2 (1):68-75.
    Bob Solomon claimed that we are not passion’s slaves. I examine whether or not we are, considering universal determinism. I argue that we indeed are free, or at least that we can be, and try to understand this. Free will resides in the presence of alternative action options, in our ability to freely search for, detect, or create them, in our ability to use them, and in our ability to, in some measure, free ourselves from the automatic impact of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  17.  25
    Action and Passion.Anton Ford - 2014 - Philosophical Topics 42 (1):13-42.
    When an agent intentionally changes something separate from herself—when, say, she opens a bottle—what is the relation between what the agent does and what the patient suffers? This paper defends the Aristotelian thesis that action is to passion as the road from Thebes to Athens is to the road from Athens to Thebes: they are two aspects of a single material reality. Philosophers of action tend to think otherwise. It is generally taken for granted that intentional transactions must be (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  5
    The Passion and the Pleasure Foucault's Art of Not Being Oneself.Keith Robinson - 2003 - Theory, Culture and Society 20 (2):119-144.
    This article interprets Foucault's life-long involvement with transgressive experiences as an art of not being oneself, an effort to escape identity and become other. By bringing together Foucault's own theoretical practices with those drawn from Deleuze and Blanchot, and linking these with biographical material, I show how Foucault's `encounters' with passion and pleasure in film, philosophy, S/M, drugs, the Greeks and suicide amount to an `art of living', an intensification of the power to affect oneself and others in processes (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  19.  39
    Heuristic Passion and Universal Intent: A Response to George R. Hunsberger.Richard Gelwick - 2001 - Tradition and Discovery 28 (1):1.
    Despite Hunsberger’s apology for Newbigen’s use of Polanyi, Newbigen in The Gospel in a Pluralist Society reverses Polanyi’s essential elements of heuristic passion and universal intent. The outcome is a misunderstanding of the common ground and differences between science and theology and a stifling and narrowing theology of cultural plurality. In contrast, Charles McCoy’s federal theology and understanding of Polanyi shows an approach of openness yet grounding in the biblical God present in the believed-in realities of global life.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  58
    Heuristic Passion And Universal Intent.Richard Gelwick - 2001 - Tradition and Discovery 28 (1):16-22.
    Despite Hunsberger’s apology for Newbigen’s use of Polanyi, Newbigen in The Gospel in a Pluralist Society reverses Polanyi’s essential elements of heuristic passion and universal intent. The outcome is a misunderstanding of the common ground and differences between science and theology and a stifling and narrowing theology of cultural plurality. In contrast, Charles McCoy’s federal theology and understanding of Polanyi shows an approach of openness yet grounding in the biblical God present in the believed-in realities of global life.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  22
    Emotion, Feeling, and Passion in Kant.Ana Marta González - 2015 - Trans/Form/Ação 38 (3):75-98.
    RESUMEN:En este trabajo se analiza el modo en que Kant distingue entre sentimiento y emoción, por un lado, y emoción y pasión, por otro, para mostrar: 1) que bajo el término “emoción” Kant entiende principalmente la afección orgánica privada de contenido cognitivo, aunque precedida y seguida de representaciones; 2) que la emoción constituye un elemento integral de lo que Kant denomina “sentimiento”, término del que se sirve para designar la dimensión subjetiva de la experiencia en sentido amplio, no limitado a (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  13
    Quiet Desperation, Secret Melancholy: Polemos and Passion in Citizenship Education.Naoko Saito - 2011 - Ethics and Education 6 (1):3 - 14.
    Contemporary scenes of democracy and education exemplify a real scepticism about the point of political participation, and by implication about one's place in society in relation to others. What is called for is a recovery of desire per se ? of people's desire to say what they want to say and their desire to participate in the creation of the public. In response, this article examines Stanley Cavell's ordinary language philosophy. The way he reconstructs philosophy from the perspective of ordinary (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  23.  65
    Recognizing the Passion in Deliberation: Toward a More Democratic Theory of Deliberative Democracy.Cheryl Ann Hall - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (4):81-95.
    : Critics have suggested that deliberative democracy reproduces inequalities of gender, race, and class by privileging calm rational discussion over passionate speech and action. Their solution is to supplement deliberation with such forms of emotional expression. Hall argues that deliberation already inherently involves passion, a point that is especially important to recognize in order to deconstruct the dichotomy between reason and passion that plays a central role in reinforcing inequalities of gender, race, and class in the first place.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  24.  20
    Passion and Intelligibility in Spiritual Education.Mike Radford - 2007 - British Journal of Educational Studies 55 (1):21-36.
    David Carr argues that the intelligibility of spiritual development as an educational activity is dependent upon there being a framework of propositions that relates to spiritual experience and that there is a methodology for establishing their truth. These propositions and the accompanying methodology need to be constructed along the lines of a traditional but re-worked form of religious education. Michael Hand argues to the contrary that there can be no methodology for the evaluation of the truth claims in relation to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  4
    Slavoj Žižek’s Passion (for the Real) and Flannery O'Connor's Hermaphrodite.George Piggford - 2016 - International Journal of Žižek Studies 10 (3).
    Žižek has argued in his books on Christianity and modernity that institutional Catholic Christianity has placed its members in a double bind by insisting on belief in a nonexistent God of Being. The laws of this God of the Symbolic are perverse in that they impose impossible requirements on all believers. By the mid-twentieth century, however, Catholicism was experiencing the revolutionary reforms of the Second Vatican Council. Dogmatic Law at this time gave way to a renewed emphasis on the community (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  43
    Controlling the Passions: Passion, Memory, and the Moral Physiology of Self in Seventeenth-Century Neurophilosophy.John Sutton - 1998 - In S. Gaukroger (ed.), The Soft Underbelly of Reason: the passions in the 17th century. Routledge. pp. 115-146.
    Some natural philosophers in the 17th century believed that they could control their own innards, specifically the animal spirits coursing incessantly through brain and nerves, in order to discipline or harness passion, cognition and action under rational guidance. This chapter addresses the mechanisms thought necessary after Eden for controlling the physiology of passion. The tragedy of human embedding in the body, with its cognitive and moral limitations, was paired with a sense of our confinement in sequential time. I (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  19
    The Life and Passion of Artemisia1.Sascha Talmor - 2004 - The European Legacy 9 (2):213-230.
    When reading Susan Vreeland's novel The Passion of Artemisia, we find ourselves in seventeenth century Renaissance Italy and the social life of Artemisia d'Orazio Gentileschi, a woman painter who was raped, tortured by the Inquisition and due to her fine and original paintings, was the first woman painter to become a member of the famous Accademia del Disegno. In sum, she struggled for her personal and artistic liberation long before anyone in Europe had heard about feminism. Moreover, Artemisia is (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  38
    'Passions and Constraint': The Marginalization of Passion in Liberal Political Theory.Cheryl Hall - 2002 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 28 (6):727-748.
    Positive arguments on behalf of passion are scarce in liberal political theory. Rather, liberal theorists tend to push passion to the margins of their theories of politics, either by ignoring it or by explicitly arguing that passion poses a danger to politics and is best kept out of the public realm. The purpose of this essay is to criticize these marginalizations and to illustrate their roots in impoverished conceptions of passion. Using a richer conception of (...) as the desire for an envisioned good, I argue that it is neither possible nor desirable to eliminate passion from politics. Passion should therefore be established as a central category of analysis in political theory alongside other key concerns. Key Words: passion • reason • politics • liberalism • eros. (shrink)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  29.  28
    Dualism, Physicalism, and the Passion of the Christ.Joungbin Lim - 2010 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 45:185-197.
    My project in this paper is to provide a plausible idea of Christ’s suffering and death in terms of two theories of the human person. One is dualism. Dualism is the view that a human person is composed of two substances, that is, a soul and a body, and he (strictly speaking) is identical with the soul. On the other hand, physicalism is the view that a human person is numerically identical with his body. I will argue that dualism is (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  27
    Faith as a Passion and Virtue.Ryan West - 2013 - Res Philosophica 90 (4):565-587.
    The Christian tradition affirms that faith is a virtue. Faith is a multifaceted reality, though, encompassing such diverse aspects as belief, trust, obedience, and more. Given this complexity, it is no surprise that various thinkers emphasize different aspects of faith in accounting for faith’s status as a virtue. In this paper I join Søren Kierkegaard in arguing that faith is a passion, and that faith is a virtue because it disposes the person of faith to proper emotional responses. The (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. Ruling Passion: The Erotics of Statecraft in Platonic Political Philosophy.Waller Newell - 2000 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Ruling Passion is the only book-length study of tyranny, statesmanship, and civic virtue in three major Platonic dialogues, the Georgias, the Symposium, and the Republic. It is also the first extended interpretation of eros as the key to Plato's understanding of both the depths of human vice and the heights of human aspirations for virtue and happiness. Through his detailed commentary and eloquent insights on the three dialogues, Waller Newell demonstrates how, for Plato, tyranny is a misguided longing for (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  32.  33
    Thinking Driven by Doubt and Passion.Alexander Styhre - 2004 - Philosophy of Management 4 (2):9-18.
    Organisation studies based on qualitative methodologies continually seek legitimacy in relation to positivist research formulating nomological knowledge on administrative practices. One of the key features regularly praised in qualitative research is the idea of reflexivity, the ability of the qualitative researcher to critically examine his or her own analysis. This paper argues that the notion of reflexivity is an uncontested area of qualitative organisation research which merits critical study. In contrast to the reflexivity model which assumes an autopoietic double hermeneutic (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  5
    XIII. Passion and Politics.Susan James - 2003 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 52:221-234.
    The sudden resurgence of interest in the emotions that has recently overtaken analytical philosophy has raised a range of questions about the place of the passions in established explanatory schemes. How, for example, do the emotions fit into theories of action organized around beliefs and desires? How can they be included in analyses of the mind developed to account for other mental states and capacities? Questions of this general form also arise within political philosophy, and the wish to acknowledge their (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  34.  21
    A Passion for Pushing the Limits.Elisabet Sahtouris PhD - 2013 - World Futures 69 (4-6):359 - 381.
    (2013). A Passion for Pushing the Limits. World Futures: Vol. 69, The Complexity of Life and Lives of Complexity, pp. 359-381.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  19
    Semiotic Approaches to Advertising Texts and Strategies: Narrative, Passion, Marketing.Cinzia Bianchi - 2011 - Semiotica 2011 (183):243-271.
    This paper provides an overview of semiotic studies about advertising, beginning with the early work done in the 1960s. Advertising communication plays a particular role in semiotic studies in the second half of the twentieth century. Pioneering studies of advertising messages, in particular those of Roland Barthes and Umberto Eco, date to the 1960s and were carried out for the most part using the tools of classical rhetoric. Following a period in which semiotics displayed a relative lack of interest in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  38
    Science, Reason and Passion.Ilya Prigogine - 1994 - World Futures 40 (1):35-43.
    The role of passion and more generally irrational elements in processing knowledge are discussed. This seems to be a paradox, as science by definition is beyond passion. At the same time science is the expression of a culture. This paradox is examined through the experience and work of crucial figures in physics such as Newton and Einstein. Science is a dialogue between man and nature: part of the search for the transcendental which is common to many cultural activities: (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  12
    The Passion of the Possible: Choice, Multiplicity, and Commitment.Maxine Greene - 1990 - Journal of Moral Education 19 (2):67-76.
    Abstract Ethical action takes place when spaces are opened for concrete choices made by situated human beings. Enmeshed in relationships and projects, such human beings must attend to the impinging social and political contexts and attempt to overcome the carelessness, systematization, and neglect that stand in the way of morality. Unable to depend on abstract formulations or ahistorical norms, they must continue clarifying their experience and creating their values by means of continuing dialogue. Carried on in the clearest language possible, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  38.  16
    The Imperfect Metaphor of Passion in Kierkegaard's Philosophical Fragments.Javier Carreño - 2007 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 69 (3):475 - 507.
    This paper revisits the charges of fideism and irrationalism oftentimes leveled against Kierkegaard's consideration of the relation of ratio to fides. To this avail the author engages one of the key texts in this polemic, namely the first three chapters of Philosophical Fragments. His reading centers on the rather subtle suggestion that eroticlove, as a surrendering of oneself to another, plays the role of a metaphor or image for the downfall of the understanding characteristic of religious conversion. By considering the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  21
    Review: Individuality Without Individualism: Review of Janice Raymond's A Passion for Friends. [REVIEW]Marilyn Friedman - 1988 - Hypatia 3 (2):131-137.
    This review of Janice Raymond's A Passion for Friends focuses on her strong sense of the individual and of individuality. However, and this is the central contention of my paper, her perspective is quite distinct from liberal individualism. It is also a complex variation on the feminist concern with selves in relationships.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  4
    Recognizing the Passion in Deliberation: Toward a More Democratic Theory of Deliberative Democracy.Cheryl Hall - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (4):81-95.
    Critics have suggested that deliberative democracy reproduces inequalities of gender, race, and class by privileging calm rational discussion over passionate speech and action. Their solution is to supplement deliberation with such forms of emotional expression. Hall argues that deliberation already inherently involves passion, a point that is especially important to recognize in order to deconstruct the dichotomy between reason and passion that plays a central role in reinforcing inequalities of gender, race, and class in the first place.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  16
    Passion and Instrumentality.Alan McQuillan - 1998 - Environmental Ethics 20 (3):317-324.
    Although J. Baird Callicott and Bryan G. Norton define the word intrinsic quite differently, both are against any “essentialist” position which posits “an objectivist theory of value in nature.” Viewed in this context, their differences emerge in terms of instrumentality and anthropocentrism. While a nonanthropocentrist position is tenable, it cannot be divorced from the centrality of human passion and desire. From the Humean perspective, assumed by both authors, however, desire does not reduce to instrumental value alone. As a result, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  5
    Un trafiquant de chair à l'œuvre: passion, pouvoir et profit dans l'économie de la boxe professionnelle.Loïc Wacquant - 2007 - Actuel Marx 1 (1):71-83.
    The Business of a Flesh-Merchant : Passion, Power, Profit in the Economy of Professional Boxing. France has witnessed a significant rise in the recourse to sub-contracting over the last twenty years. The article is the result of an inquiry carried out by way of observation and participation in a boxing club located on the outskirts of Chicago’s «South Side », close to the University of Chicago. The paper focuses on the matchmaker as a particular figure in the world of (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  8
    'The Epidermis of Reality': Artaud, the Material Body and Dreyer's The Passion of Joan of Arc.Ros Murray - 2013 - Film-Philosophy 17 (1):445-461.
    This article examines Artaud's 1920s cinema texts, arguing that like other theorists writing at the time, Artaud envisaged the medium of cinema as capable of forging new types of corporeal experience, both through the types of bodies that were portrayed onscreen, and their relationship to the body of the audience, conceived as collective force rather than an individual spectator. It pays particular attention to Artaud's theories of corporeal materiality, and argues that these are relevant to more recent approaches to embodiment (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  15
    Descartes on the Identity of Passion and Action.Joel A. Schickel - 2011 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (6):1067 - 1084.
    According to the standard Aristotelian doctrine of the identity of passion and action (Ipa), a passion and the action with which it is identified are distinguished through a distinction of reason, and both passion and action are located in the patient. Descartes has recently been interpreted by some scholars to be rejecting Ipa in favor of a view that throws into contention a dualistic interpretation of his philosophy of mind. This article contends that Descartes did hold Ipa, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  22
    Descartes on Passion Reformation.Basileios Kroustallis - 2005 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 87 (3):312-323.
    Descartes’ account of emotion conflict in the Passions of the Soul has recently been the subject of Shapiro’s essay (2003), who claims that agent evaluation of the human good operates as an explanatory factor for the reformation of existing mind-body associations. On the contrary, it is here argued that this passion reformation involves explicit reasoning processes, and that the tendency to promote the good of the human being either denotes the cause and not the reason for the original (...) formation or is a specific reasoning method. Passion reformation does not seem to be essentially related to the problem of mind-body union. (shrink)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. The Passion for Free Markets.Noam Chomsky - unknown
    So runs postwar history, we learn from the opening paragraph of a front-page story by New York Times political analyst David Sanger. But times are changing. Today, the headline reads: "U.S. Is Exporting Its Free- Market Values Through Global Commercial Agreements." Going beyond the traditional reliance on the UN, the Clinton administration is turning to the new World Trade Organization (WTO) to carry out the task of "exporting American values." Down the road, Sanger continues (quoting the U.S. trade representative), it (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  8
    'Learn Virtue and Toil'. Giovanni Pontano on Passion, Virtue and Arduousness.Matthias Roick - 2011 - History of Political Thought 32 (5):732-750.
    In discussions of early-modern notions of passion and virtue, the humanist movement has played only a minor role. However, it has its own characteristics and approaches to the problem of passion and virtue. The moral philosophy of the Neapolitan humanist Giovanni Pontano is a case in point. Pontano pronounces himself against the Stoic doctrine of the eradication of the passions. Although his moral psychology follows traditional conceptions of the passions as subjected to the rule of reason, it rather (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  1
    Pope's Ethical Thinking: Passion and Irony in Dialogue.Christopher Tilmouth - 2012 - Proceedings of the British Academy 181:35.
    This lecture examines Alexander Pope's depictions of passion and sentiment in a range of early writings, including his ‘Prologue’ to Addison's Cato, Eloisa to Abelard and An Essay on Man. It then shows how often Pope belittled his own forays into affectivity and relates that tendency to a wider interest in ‘sceptical perspectivism’. The presence of the latter is traced in other works such as John Gay's Trivia, Bernard Mandeville's Fable of the Bees and the 3rd Earl of Shaftesbury's (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  13
    The Combat of Passion and Reason.J. E. Tiles - 1977 - Philosophy 52 (201):321 - 330.
    But if reason has no original influence, it is impossible it can withstand any principle which has such an efficacy, or ever keep the mind in suspense a moment. Thus, it appears, that the principle which opposes our passions cannot be the same with reason, and is only called so in an improper sense. We speak not strictly and philosophically, when we talk of the combat of passion and of reason.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  10
    Not Passion's Slave: Emotions and Choice.Jerome Neu - 2005 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 71 (3):741-744.
    Critical Notice of Robert C. Solomon's _Not Passion's Slave_ (2003, OUP).
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000