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  1. Do What Consumers Say Matter? The Misalignment of Preferences with Unconstrained Ethical Intentions.Pat Auger & Timothy M. Devinney - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 76 (4):361-383.
    Nearly all studies of consumers’ willingness to engage in ethical or socially responsible purchasing behavior is based on unconstrained survey response methods. In the present article we ask the question of how well does asking consumers the extent to which they care about a specific social or ethical issue relate to how they would behave in a more constrained environment where there is no socially acceptable response. The results of a comparison between traditional survey questions of “intention to purchase” and (...)
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  2.  73
    What Will Consumers Pay for Social Product Features?Pat Auger, Paul Burke, Timothy M. Devinney & Jordan J. Louviere - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 42 (3):281 - 304.
    The importance of ethical consumerism to many companies worldwide has increased dramatically in recent years. Ethical consumerism encompasses the importance of non-traditional and social components of a company's products and business process to strategic success - such as environmental protectionism, child labor practices and so on. The present paper utilizes a random utility theoretic experimental design to provide estimates of the relative value selected consumers place on the social features of products.
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  3.  38
    Journal of Business Ethics, Volume 42, Number 3 - SpringerLink.Pat Auger, Paul Burke, Timothy M. Devinney & Jordan J. Louviere - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 42 (3):281-304.
    ... The purpose of this paper is to try to clarify the extent to which consumers “value” ethical product features when making purchases by utilizing a distinctive methodology – structured choice experiments ( Louviere et al., 2000) – that What Will Consumers Pay ... Jordan J. Louviere ... \n.
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  4. Using Best–Worst Scaling Methodology to Investigate Consumer Ethical Beliefs Across Countries.Pat Auger, Timothy M. Devinney & Jordan J. Louviere - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 70 (3):299-326.
    This study uses best–worst scaling experiments to examine differences across six countries in the attitudes of consumers towards social and ethical issues that included both product related issues (such as recycled packaging) and general social factors (such as human rights). The experiments were conducted using over 600 respondents from Germany, Spain, Turkey, USA, India, and Korea. The results show that there is indeed some variation in the attitudes towards social and ethical issues across these six countries. However, what is more (...)
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    Using Best–Worst Scaling Methodology to Investigate Consumer Ethical Beliefs Across Countries.Pat Auger, Timothy M. Devinney & J. Louviere - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 70 (3):299-326.
    This study uses best–worst scaling experiments to examine differences across six countries in the attitudes of consumers towards social and ethical issues that included both product related issues and general social factors. The experiments were conducted using over 600 respondents from Germany, Spain, Turkey, USA, India, and Korea. The results show that there is indeed some variation in the attitudes towards social and ethical issues across these six countries. However, what is more telling are the similarities seen and the extent (...)
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  6.  9
    Green Consumption Practices Among Young Environmentalists: A Practice Theory Perspective.Chamila Perera, Pat Auger & Jill Klein - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 152 (3):843-864.
    We examined the subjective experiences of young environmentalists who engage in green consumption practices from the theoretical lens of Warde’s :131–153, 2005) practice theory. Data were gathered through 21 photo-elicited, in-depth interviews with young environmentalists. Based on our findings, we postulated a theoretical framework to understand green consumption practices among our informants as a process with three interrelated phases: green credibility seeking, green procurement and prosumption, and green whispers. This inductive investigation revealed various symbolic meanings of green consumption that are (...)
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    Measuring the Importance of Ethical Consumerism: A Multi-Country Empirical Investigation.Pat Auger, Timothy Devinney & Jordan Louviere - 2007 - International Corporate Responsibility Series 3:207-221.
    This paper describes the results of several large empirical studies that investigated the impact of social product attributes on consumer purchase intentions. Our results show that some consumers are willing to pay for more socially acceptable products, but that most of those consumers do not think about the social product features of the products they purchase. Furthermore, our analyses demonstrate that consumers can be segmented based on their preferences for (or against) social product features and that these segments are not (...)
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    Measuring the Importance of Ethical Consumerism: A Multi-Country Empirical Investigation.Pat Auger, Timothy Devinney & Jordan Louviere - 2007 - International Corporate Responsibility Series 3:207-221.
    This paper describes the results of several large empirical studies that investigated the impact of social product attributes on consumer purchase intentions. Our results show that some consumers are willing to pay for more socially acceptable products, but that most of those consumers do not think about the social product features of the products they purchase. Furthermore, our analyses demonstrate that consumers can be segmented based on their preferences for social product features and that these segments are not country-specific.
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