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  1.  21
    Dismantling the Master's House: A Hestian / Hermean Deconstruction of Classic Texts.Patricia J. Thompson - 1994 - Hypatia 9 (4):38 - 56.
    Classical philosophy adopts the standpoint of males in the Greek polis. The consequent adumbration of the standpoint of women and noncitizen men in the oikos, the household, has implications for feminist philosophy. Two systems of action are differentiated: the domestic economy protected by the goddess Hestia, and the political economy protected by Hermes. Shifting one's standpoint to include both the oikos and the polis offers an alternative to gender as the defining issue in feminist theory.
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  2.  8
    Dismantling the Master's House: A Hestian/Hermean Deconstruction of Classic Texts.Patricia J. Thompson - 1994 - Hypatia 9 (4):38-56.
    Classical philosophy adopts the standpoint of males in the Greek polis. The consequent adumbration of the standpoint of women and noncitizen men in the oikos, the household, has implications for feminist philosophy. Two systems of action are differentiated: the domestic economy protected by the goddess Hestia, and the political economy protected by Hermes. Shifting one's standpoint to include both the oikos and the polis offers an alternative to gender as the defining issue in feminist theory.
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  3.  11
    Reclaiming Hermes: Guardian of the Public Sphere.Patricia J. Thompson - 1997 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 4 (4):42-56.
    In an earlier paper, Hestia (R. Vesta)-guardian of the family hearthfire and center of household/family ritual activities in the ancient Greek oikos-was re-claimed as a metaphor for philosophical analysis of the private sphere in everyday life (SPCW, 1996). This paper undertakes a comparable project of reclamation for Hermes (R. Mercury), guardian of the public sphere of the ancient Greek polis and its later manifestations. The goal of this project of reclamation is not to introduce unnecessary neologisms or to support “New (...)
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    Re-Claiming Hestia: Goddess of Everyday Life.Patricia J. Thompson - 1996 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 3 (4):20-28.
    The concepts of “hearth and home” and “keeping the home fire burning” can be traced back to ancient Greece and are associated with the oikos. Such metaphors remain pervasive (if often disregarded) expressions in contemporary life. The goddess Hestia, identified as the “goddess of the hearth,” has been maligned in the patriarchal literature and ignored in feminist writing. This paper argues for re-visiting and reclaiming Hestia as a unifying principle in meeting the quotidian demands of everyday life. It suggests a (...)
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