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  1.  24
    Heidegger, Education, and Modernity.Michael A. Peters, Valerie Allen, Ares D. Axiotis, Michael Bonnett, David E. Cooper, Patrick Fitzsimons, Ilan Gur-Ze'ev, Padraig Hogan, F. Ruth Irwin, Bert Lambeir, Paul Smeyers, Paul Standish & Iain Thomson - 2002 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Martin Heidegger is, perhaps, the most controversial philosopher of the twentieth-century. Little has been written on him or about his work and its significance for educational thought. This unique collection by a group of international scholars reexamines Heidegger's work and its legacy for educational thought.
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  2.  21
    Education and the philosophy of the subject (or constitution of self).James Marshall, Michael Peters & Patrick Fitzsimons - 1997 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 29 (1):75-88.
    (1997). Education and the philosophy of the subject (or constitution of self) Educational Philosophy and Theory: Vol. 29, No. 1, pp. v-xi. doi: 10.1111/j.1469-5812.1997.tb00523.x.
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  3.  20
    Philosophy and indigenous cultural transformation.Patrick Fitzsimons & Graham Smith - 2000 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 32 (1):25–41.
  4.  49
    Critical rationalism and educational discourse G. Zecha (ed.).Patrick Fitzsimons - 2000 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 32 (2):253–262.
  5.  12
    Critical Rationalism and Educational Discourse G. Zecha (Ed.).Patrick Fitzsimons - 2000 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 32 (2):253-262.
  6.  23
    The Politics of Self Constitution.Patrick Fitzsimons - 1997 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 29 (1):75-88.
    The OECD asserts that the role of endogenous growth theory is a key input to research underlying technological processes that enhance productivity. Within neo‐liberal accounts of governance there is a paradoxical explanation of the free self, firstly as one who exercises some type of choice, and secondly as a self constituted through the exercise of choice. Neo‐liberalism, however, does not provide a robust account of self constitution. Foucault's notion of Governmentality therefore is advanced as a more adequate account of the (...)
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