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  1.  26
    Applicants’ Fairness Perceptions of Algorithm-Driven Hiring Procedures.Maude Lavanchy, Patrick Reichert, Jayanth Narayanan & Krishna Savani - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics.
    Despite the rapid adoption of technology in human resource departments, there is little empirical work that examines the potential challenges of algorithmic decision-making in the recruitment process. In this paper, we take the perspective of job applicants and examine how they perceive the use of algorithms in selection and recruitment. Across four studies on Amazon Mechanical Turk, we show that people in the role of a job applicant perceive algorithm-driven recruitment processes as less fair compared to human only or algorithm-assisted (...)
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  2.  50
    What is a Fair Level of Profit for Social Enterprise? Insights from Microfinance.Marek Hudon, Marc Labie & Patrick Reichert - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (3):627-644.
    Although microfinance organizations are generally considered as inherently ethical, recent events have challenged the legitimacy of the sector. High interest rates and the excessive profitability of some market leaders have raised the question of how to define a fair profit level for social enterprise. In this article, we construct a fair profit framework based on four dimensions: profitability, social mission, pricing, and surplus distribution. We then apply this framework using an empirical sample of 496 microfinance institutions. Results indicate that satisfying (...)
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  3.  25
    From Fiduciary Duty to Impact Fidelity: Managerial Compensation in Impact Investing.Isaline Thirion, Patrick Reichert, Virginie Xhauflair & Jonathan De Jonck - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 179 (4):991-1010.
    Investors with standard monetary preferences will give a fund manager incentives to increase firm profits, which can be achieved through a share in profits via carried interest. When investors have social preferences, it is not clear which incentives the manager should receive. We explore this puzzle by applying an agency theory perspective to impact investing, a practice where investors seek both financial returns and a measurable social or environmental impact. Using an inductive, qualitative approach, we identify and describe the ethical (...)
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