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  1.  57
    An Empirical Investigation of the Relationships Between Ethical Beliefs, Ethical Ideology, Political Preference and Need for Closure.Patrick Van Kenhove, Iris Vermeir & Steven Verniers - 2001 - Journal of Business Ethics 32 (4):347-361.
    An analysis is presented of the relationships between consumers ethical beliefs, ethical ideology, Machiavellianism, political preference and the individual difference variable "need for closure". It is based on a representative survey of 286 Belgian respondents. Standard measurement tools of proven reliability and robustness are used to measure ethical beliefs (consumer ethics scale), ethical ideology (ethical positioning), Machiavellianism (Mach IV scale) and need for closure. The analysis finds the following. First, individuals with a high need for closure tend to have beliefs (...)
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  2.  8
    Assertiveness Bias in Gender Ethics Research: Why Women Deserve the Benefit of the Doubt: Marketing and Consumer Behavior.Saar Bossuyt & Patrick Van Kenhove - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (3):727-739.
    Gender is one of the most researched and contentious topics in consumer ethics research. It is common for researchers of gender studies to presume that women are more ethical than men because of their reputation for having a selfless, sensitive nature. Nevertheless, we found evidence that women behaved less ethically than men in two field experiments testing a passive form of unethical behavior. Women benefited to a larger extent from a cashier miscalculating the bill in their favor than men. However, (...)
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  3.  31
    Gender Differences in Double Standards.Iris Vermeir & Patrick Van Kenhove - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 81 (2):281 - 295.
    The purpose of the present study is to investigate gender differences in the use of double standards in ethical judgements of questionable conduct instigated by business or consumers. We investigate if consumers are more critical towards unethical corporate versus consumer actions and if these double standards depend on the gender of the respondent. In the first study, we compared evaluations of four specific unethical actions [cfr. DePaulo, 1987, in: J. Saegert (ed.) Proceedings of the Division of Consumer Psychology (American Psychological (...)
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  4.  45
    The Relationship Between Consumers' Unethical Behavior and Customer Loyalty in a Retail Environment.Patrick Van Kenhove, Kristof De Wulf & Sarah Steenhaut - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 44 (4):261-278.
    This paper investigates the relationship between two outcomes of relationship marketing – affective commitment and behavioral loyalty – and consumers' unethical behavior. The main objective of the study is to assess whether affective commitment and behavioral loyalty to a store translate into more ethical behavior towards that store, controlling for the variables of age, gender, and ethical beliefs. The study does not rely on a single measurement tool, but is based on ten months' panel data and three different mail surveys (...)
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  5.  8
    Published in Journal of Business Ethics, 69 (3), 2006, 269-288.Sarah Steenhaut & Patrick Van Kenhove - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 69 (3):269-288.
    ABSTRACTIn this paper, we theorize that the anticipation of guilt plays an important role in ethically questionable consumer situations. We propose an ethical decision-making framework incorporating anticipated guilt as partial mediator between consumers’ ethical beliefs and intentions. In the first study, we compared several models using structural equation modeling and found empirical support for our research model. A second experiment was set up to illustrate how these new insights may be applied to prevent consumers from taking advantage of the seller. (...)
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  6.  9
    “What’s the Harm in Being Unethical? These Strangers Are Rich Anyway!” Exploring Underlying Factors of Double Standards.Tine De Bock, Iris Vermeir & Patrick Van Kenhove - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 112 (2):225-240.
    Previous studies show evidence of double standards in terms of individuals being more tolerant of questionable consumer practices than of similar business practices. However, whether these double standards are necessarily due to the fact that one party is a business company while the other is a consumer was not addressed. The results of our two experimental studies, conducted among 277 (Study 1) and 264 (Study 2) participants from a Western European country by means of an anonymous self-administered online survey, demonstrate (...)
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  7.  11
    One Sail Fits All? A Psychographic Segmentation of Digital Pirates.Charlotte Emily De Corte & Patrick Van Kenhove - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 143 (3):441-465.
    This paper focuses on segmenting digital movie and TV series pirates and on investigating the effectiveness of piracy-combatting measures i.e., legal and educational strategies, in light of these segments. To address these research objectives, two online studies were conducted. First, 1277 valid responses were gathered with an online survey. Four pirate segments were found based on differing combinations of attitude toward piracy, ethical evaluation of piracy and feelings of guilt. The anti-pirate, conflicted pirate, cavalier pirate, and die-hard pirate can be (...)
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  8.  52
    The Mediating Role of Anticipated Guilt in Consumers' Ethical Decision-Making.Sarah Steenhaut & Patrick Van Kenhove - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 69 (3):269 - 288.
    In this paper, we theorize that the anticipation of guilt plays an important role in ethically questionable consumer situations. We propose an ethical decision-making framework incorporating anticipated guilt as partial mediator between consumers' ethical beliefs (anteceded by ethical ideology) and intentions. In the first study, we compared several models using structural equation modeling and found empirical support for our research model. A second experiment was set up to illustrate how these new insights may be applied to prevent consumers from taking (...)
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  9.  13
    Double Standards: The Role of Techniques of Neutralization.Tine De Bock & Patrick Van Kenhove - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 99 (2):283 - 296.
    Despite the growing number of studies examining consumers' perceptions of unethical corporate and consumer practices, research examining the apparent double standard existing between what consumers perceive as acceptable corporate behaviour and what they believe are acceptable consumer practices remains scarce. Contradictory, double standards are often quoted by other researchers as a major stream in ethical literature.The few studies dealing with this topic as well as this study indicate that people rate corporate unethical actions as less admissible compared to similar consumer (...)
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  10.  31
    Relationship Commitment and Ethical Consumer Behavior in a Retail Setting: The Case of Receiving Too Much Change at the Checkout.Sarah Steenhaut & Patrick Van Kenhove - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 56 (4):335 - 353.
    In this study, we conducted two experiments to examine the effect of relationship commitment on the reaction of shoppers to receiving too much change, controlling for the amount of excess change. Hypotheses based on equity theory, opportunism and guilt were set up and tested. The first study showed that, when the less committed consumer is confronted with a large excess of change, he/she is less likely to report this mistake, compared with a small excess. Conversely, consumers with a high commitment (...)
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