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  1.  19
    Ban the Sunset? Nonpropositional Content and Regulation of Pharmaceutical Advertising.Paul Biegler & Patrick Vargas - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (5):3-13.
    The risk that direct-to-consumer advertising of prescription pharmaceuticals (DTCA) may increase inappropriate medicine use is well recognized. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration addresses this concern by subjecting DTCA content to strict scrutiny. Its strictures are, however, heavily focused on the explicit claims made in commercials, what we term their ?propositional content.? Yet research in social psychology suggests advertising employs techniques to influence viewers via nonpropositional content, for example, images and music. We argue that one such technique, evaluative conditioning, is (...)
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  2.  2
    Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Ban the Sunset? Nonpropositional Content and Regulation of Pharmaceutical Advertising”.Paul Biegler & Patrick Vargas - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (5):W1 - W5.
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  3.  12
    Ethics of Implicit Persuasion in Pharmaceutical Advertising.Paul Biegler, Jeanette Kennett, Justin Oakley & Patrick Vargas - unknown
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  4.  9
    Feeling Is Believing: Evaluative Conditioning and the Ethics of Pharmaceutical Advertising.Paul Biegler & Patrick Vargas - 2016 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 13 (2):271-279.
    A central goal in regulating direct-to-consumer advertising of prescription pharmaceuticals is to ensure that explicit drug claims are truthful. Yet imagery can also alter viewer attitudes, and the degree to which this occurs in DTCA is uncertain. Addressing this data gap, we provide evidence that positive feelings produced by images can promote favourable beliefs about pharmaceuticals. We had participants view a fictitious anti-influenza drug paired with unrelated images that elicited either positive, neutral or negative feelings. Participants who viewed positive images (...)
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