Results for 'Patrik Kj��rsdam Tell��us'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  6
    Faktorer, der har betydning for sygeplejerskers holdning til ”God Klinisk Praksis”.Patrik Kjærsdam Telléus, Dorte Møller Holdgaard & Birthe Thørring - 2019 - Etikk I Praksis - Nordic Journal of Applied Ethics 2:99-111.
    _Vi gennemførte i 2016 et omfattende empirisk studie på Aalborg Universitetshospital med henblik på at afdække de forskellige sundhedsprofessioners etiske holdninger. Hensigten var at afdække eventuelle forskelle mellem professionerne samt at få begrebsliggjort de etiske tankemønstre, der er tilstede i den kliniske praksis. Vi fandt i den indledende dataanalyse, at vi med signifikans kunne vise, at plejegruppen i højere grad bruger nærhedsetiske og omsorgsetiske vurderinger, til forskel fra lægegruppen, der er mere pligtetisk funderet__. Undersøgelsen blev sat op ved brug af (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  6
    Physicians and Caregivers Do Differ in Ethical Attitudes to Daily Clinical Practice.Patrik Kjærsdam Telléus, Dorte Møller Holdgaard & Birthe Thørring - 2018 - Clinical Ethics 13 (4):209-219.
    It is commonly assumed that there are differences in physicians’ and caregivers’ ethical attitudes towards clinical situations. The assumption is that the difference is driven by different values, views and judgements in specific situations. At Aalborg University Hospital, Denmark, we aimed to investigate these assumptions by conducting a large quantitative study. The study design, based on the Factorial Survey Method, was a carefully constructed survey with 50 questions designed to test which factors influenced the respondents’ ethical reasoning. The factors were (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  3.  1
    Membership Categorization and Storytelling.Dennis Day & Susanne Kjærbeck - 2019 - Pragmatics and Society 10 (3):359-374.
    In this paper, we demonstrate how the collaborative and sequential unfolding of a story ties into the constitution of a membership categorization device which we have glossed as ‘us and them’. The data come from a focus group activity where first and second generation immigrants to Denmark have been asked to discuss their situation in Denmark. Using Ethnomethodological Conversation and Membership Categorization Analysis, we present one story which involves a story-teller and his family and an elderly Danish couple living in (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Braintrust: What Neuroscience Tells Us About Morality.Patricia S. Churchland - 2011 - Princeton University Press.
    What is morality? Where does it come from? And why do most of us heed its call most of the time? In Braintrust, neurophilosophy pioneer Patricia Churchland argues that morality originates in the biology of the brain. She describes the "neurobiological platform of bonding" that, modified by evolutionary pressures and cultural values, has led to human styles of moral behavior. The result is a provocative genealogy of morals that asks us to reevaluate the priority given to religion, absolute rules, and (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   76 citations  
  5.  20
    Objects Tell Us What Action We Can Expect: Dissociating Brain Areas for Retrieval and Exploitation of Action Knowledge During Action Observation in fMRI.Ricarda I. Schubotz, Moritz F. Wurm, Marco K. Wittmann & D. Yves von Cramon - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
  6. What Do Symmetries Tell Us About Structure?Thomas William Barrett - 2017 - Philosophy of Science (4):617-639.
    Mathematicians, physicists, and philosophers of physics often look to the symmetries of an object for insight into the structure and constitution of the object. My aim in this paper is to explain why this practice is successful. In order to do so, I present a collection of results that are closely related to (and in a sense, generalizations of) Beth’s and Svenonius’ theorems.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  7.  72
    What Neuropsychology Tells Us About Consciousness.Ran Lahav - 1993 - Philosophy of Science 60 (1):67-85.
    I argue that, contrary to some critics, the notion of conscious experience is a good candidate for denoting a distinct and scientifically interesting phenomenon in the brain. I base this claim mainly on an analysis of neuropsychological data concerning deficits resulting from various types of brain damage as well as some additional supporting empirical evidence. These data strongly point to the hypothesis that conscious experience expresses information that is available for global, integrated, and flexible behavior.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   69 citations  
  8. What Does Functionalism Tell Us About Personal Identity?Eric T. Olson - 2002 - Noûs 36 (4):682-698.
    Sydney Shoemaker argues that the functionalist theory of mind entails a psychological-continuity view of personal identity, as well as providing a defense of that view against a crucial objection. I show that his view has surprising consequences, e.g. that no organism could have mental properties and that a thing's mental properties fail to supervene even weakly on its microstructure and surroundings. I then argue that the view founders on "fission" cases and rules out our being material things. Functionalism tells us (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  9. What Can Information Encapsulation Tell Us About Emotional Rationality?Raamy Majeed - 2019 - In Laura Candiotto (ed.), The Value of Emotions for Knowledge. Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 51-69.
    What can features of cognitive architecture, e.g. the information encapsulation of certain emotion processing systems, tell us about emotional rationality? de Sousa proposes the following hypothesis: “the role of emotions is to supply the insufficiency of reason by imitating the encapsulation of perceptual modes” (de Sousa 1987: 195). Very roughly, emotion processing can sometimes occur in a way that is insensitive to what an agent already knows, and such processing can assist reasoning by restricting the response-options she considers. This paper (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  10.  25
    ‘Tell Us What You Want to Do, and We'll Tell You How to Do It Ethically’—Academic Bioethics: Routinely Ideological and Occasionally Corrupt.Miran Epstein - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (8):63-65.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  11. What Does Moral Phenomenology Tell Us About Moral Objectivity?Terry Horgan & Mark Timmons - 2008 - Social Philosophy and Policy 25 (1):267-300.
    Moral phenomenology is concerned with the elements of one's moral experiences that are generally available to introspection. Some philosophers argue that one's moral experiences, such as experiencing oneself as being morally obligated to perform some action on some occasion, contain elements that (1) are available to introspection and (2) carry ontological objectivist purportargument from phenomenological introspection.neutrality thesisthe phenomenological data regarding one's moral experiences that is available to introspection is neutral with respect to the issue of whether such experiences carry ontological (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  12.  18
    What Emotional Reactions Can Tell Us About the Nature of Others: An Appraisal Perspective on Person Perception.Shlomo Hareli & Ursula Hess - 2010 - Cognition and Emotion 24 (1):128-140.
  13. What Students' Arguments Can Tell Us: Using Argumentation Schemes in Science Education.Fabrizio Macagno & Aikaterini Konstantinidou - 2013 - Argumentation 27 (3):225-243.
    The relationship between teaching and argumentation is becoming a crucial issue in the field of education and, in particular, science education. Teaching has been analyzed as a dialogue aimed at persuading the interlocutors, introducing a conceptual change that needs to be grounded on the audience’s background knowledge. This paper addresses this issue from a perspective of argumentation studies. Our claim is that argumentation schemes, namely abstract patterns of argument, can be an instrument for reconstructing the tacit premises in students’ argumentative (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  14.  27
    What Can Music Tell Us About Social Interaction?Alessandro D’Ausilio, Giacomo Novembre, Luciano Fadiga & Peter E. Keller - 2015 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 19 (3):111-114.
  15. What Can Cognitive Science Tell Us About Scientific Revolutions?Alexander Bird - 2012 - Theoria : An International Journal for Theory, History and Fundations of Science 27 (3):293-321.
    Kuhn’s Structure of Scientific Revolutions is notable for the readiness with which it drew on the results of cognitive psychology. These naturalistic elements were not well received and Kuhn did not subsequently develop them in his pub- lished work. Nonetheless, in a philosophical climate more receptive to naturalism, we are able to give a more positive evaluation of Kuhn’s proposals. Recently, philosophers such as Nersessian, Nickles, Andersen, Barker, and Chen have used the results of work on case-based reasoning, analogical thinking, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  16.  24
    What Systems Biology Can Tell Us About Disease.Fridolin Gross - 2011 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 33 (4).
    - A recent debate has touched upon the question of whether diseases can be understood as dysfunctional mechanisms or whether there are "pathological" mechanisms that deserve to be investigated and explained independently (Nervi 2010; Moghaddam Taaheri 2011). Here I suggest that both views tell us something important about disease but that in many instances only a systemic view can shed light on the relationship between physiology and pathology. I provide examples from the literature in systems biology in support of my (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  17.  15
    Ebola: What It Tells Us About Medical Ethics.Angus J. Dawson - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (1):107-110.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  18. Permission to Believe: Why Permissivism Is True and What It Tells Us About Irrelevant Influences on Belief.Miriam Schoenfield - 2014 - Noûs 48 (2):193-218.
    In this paper, I begin by defending permissivism: the claim that, sometimes, there is more than one way to rationally respond to a given body of evidence. Then I argue that, if we accept permissivism, certain worries that arise as a result of learning that our beliefs were caused by the communities we grew up in, the schools we went to, or other irrelevant influences dissipate. The basic strategy is as follows: First, I try to pinpoint what makes irrelevant influences (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   148 citations  
  19.  82
    What Liars Can Tell Us About the Knowledge Norm of Practical Reasoning.Don Fallis - 2011 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 49 (4):347-367.
    If knowledge is the norm of practical reasoning, then we should be able to alter people's behavior by affecting their knowledge as well as by affecting their beliefs. Thus, as Roy Sorensen (2010) suggests, we should expect to find people telling lies that target knowledge rather than just lies that target beliefs. In this paper, however, I argue that Sorensen's discovery of “knowledge-lies” does not support the claim that knowledge is the norm of practical reasoning. First, I use a Bayesian (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  20.  33
    What Can Neuroscience Tell Us About Reference?Berit Brogaard - 2019 - In Barbara Abbott & Jeanette Gundel (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Reference. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 365-383.
    In traditional formal semantics the notions of reference, truth and satisfaction are basic and that of representation is derivative and dispensable. If a level of representation is included in the formal presentation of the theory, it is included as a heuristic. Semantics in the traditional sense has no bearing on any form of mental processing. When reference is understood within this framework, cognitive neuroscience cannot possibly provide any insights into the nature of reference. Traditional semantics, however, has numerous shortcomings that (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  21.  34
    What the Progressive Aspect Tells Us About Processes.Ziqian Zhou - 2018 - Synthese 198 (1):267-293.
    Numerous authors have attempted to carve an ontological distinction between events and processes on the basis of a widely noted linguistic datum involving count and mass nouns, where events are thought to be analogous to countable objects while processes to non-countable stuff. By assessing the most developed of these proposals—that of Helen Steward’s—this paper locates the motivations behind the project of carving some such distinction between events and processes, and proceeds to offer considerations toward an alternative account of processes—one whose (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  22. What Can the Mind Tell Us About the Brain? Psychology, Neurophysiology, and Constraint.Gary Hatfield - 2009 - In Perception and Cognition: Essays in the Philosophy of Psychology. Clarendon Press. pp. 434-55.
    This chapter examines the relations between psychology and neuroscience. There is a strong philosophical intuition that direct study of the brain can and will constrain the development of psychological theory. When this intuition is tested against case studies from the psychology of perception and memory, it turns out that psychology has led the way toward knowledge of neurophysiology. The chapter presents an abstract argument to show that psychology can and must lead the way in neuroscientific study of mental function. The (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  23. What Causal Conditional Reasoning Tells Us About People's Understanding of Causality.Sieghard Beller & Gregory Kuhnm - 2007 - Thinking and Reasoning 13 (4):426 – 460.
    Causal conditional reasoning means reasoning from a conditional statement that refers to causal content. We argue that data from causal conditional reasoning tasks tell us something not only about how people interpret conditionals, but also about how they interpret causal relations. In particular, three basic principles of people's causal understanding emerge from previous studies: the modal principle, the exhaustive principle, and the equivalence principle. Restricted to the four classic conditional inferences—Modus Ponens, Modus Tollens, Denial of the Antecedent, and Affirmation of (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  24. What Brains Won't Tell Us About the Mind: A Critique of the Neurobiological Argument Against Representational Nativism.Richard Samuels - 1998 - Mind and Language 13 (4):548-570.
  25. Psychopathy: What Apology Making Tells Us About Moral Agency.Gloria Ayob & Tim Thornton - 2014 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 35 (1):17-29.
    Psychopathy is often used to settle disputes about the nature of moral judgment. The “trolley problem” is a familiar scenario in which psychopathy is used as a test case. Where a convergence in response to the trolley problem is registered between psychopathic subjects and non-psychopathic subjects, it is assumed that this convergence indicates that the capacity for making moral judgments is unimpaired in psychopathy. This, in turn, is taken to have implications for the dispute between motivation internalists and motivation externalists, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  26.  72
    Does Reason Tell Us What Moral Code to Follow and, Indeed, to Follow Any Moral Code at All?John C. Harsanyi - 1985 - Ethics 96 (1):42-55.
  27. What Angles Can Tell Us About What Holes Are Not.Phillip John Meadows - 2013 - Erkenntnis 78 (2):319-331.
    In this paper I argue that holes are not objects, but should instead be construed as properties or relations. The argument proceeds by first establishing a claim about angles: that angles are not objects, but properties or relations. It is then argued that holes and angles belong to the same category, on the grounds that they share distinctive existence and identity conditions. This provides an argument in favour of categorizing holes as one categorizes angles. I then argue that a commitment (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  28.  19
    What Hands May Tell Us About Reading and Writing.Anne Mangen - 2016 - Educational Theory 66 (4):457-477.
    Reading and writing are increasingly performed with digital, screen-based technologies rather than with analogue technologies such as paper and pen. The current digitization is an occasion to “unpack,” theoretically and conceptually, what is entailed in reading and writing as embodied, multisensory processes involving audiovisual and ergonomic interaction with devices having particular affordances. Highlighting the sensorimotor contingencies of substrates and technologies — how movement and object manipulation affect perception, experience, and sensory “feel” — this article presents an embodied approach to reading, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  29. Visual Agnosia: Disorders of Object Recognition and What They Tell Us About Normal Vision.Martha J. Farah - 1990 - MIT Press.
    Visual Agnosia is a comprehensive and up-to-date review of disorders of higher vision that relates these disorders to current conceptions of higher vision from cognitive science, illuminating both the neuropsychological disorders and the nature of normal visual object recognition.Brain damage can lead to selective problems with visual perception, including visual agnosia the inability to recognize objects even though elementary visual functions remain unimpaired. Such disorders are relatively rare, yet they provide a window onto how the normal brain might accomplish the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   108 citations  
  30. What Causally Insensitive Events Tell Us About Overdetermination.Sara Bernstein - 2014 - Philosophia 42 (4):1-18.
    Suppose that Billy and Suzy each throw a rock at window, and either rock is sufficient to shatter the window. While some consider this a paradigmatic case of causal overdetermination, in which multiple cases are sufficient for an outcome, others consider it a case of joint causation, in which multiple causes are necessary to bring about an effect. Some hold that every case of overdetermination is a case of joint causation underdescribed: at a maximal level of description, every cause is (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  31.  65
    Confirmation Via Analogue Simulation: What Dumb Holes Could Tell Us About Gravity.Radin Dardashti, Karim P. Y. Thébault & Eric Winsberg - 2017 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 68 (1).
    In this article we argue for the existence of ‘analogue simulation’ as a novel form of scientific inference with the potential to be confirmatory. This notion is distinct from the modes of analogical reasoning detailed in the literature, and draws inspiration from fluid dynamical ‘dumb hole’ analogues to gravitational black holes. For that case, which is considered in detail, we defend the claim that the phenomena of gravitational Hawking radiation could be confirmed in the case that its counterpart is detected (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  32.  3
    Adaptationist Accounts Can Tell Us More About Religion Than Cognitive Accounts Can.Konrad Szocik - 2018 - In Hans van Eyghen, Rik Peels & Gijsbert van den Brink (eds.), New Developments in the Cognitive Science of Religion - the Rationality of Religious Belief. Springer. pp. 93-108.
    Religious beliefs can be explained in two different ways, cognitive and adaptationist. Each of them is another kind of explanation, one is proximate and the other ultimate. Each of them provides the other with a specific status for religious beliefs, such as by-product or adaptation. However, there is no clarity of how cognition itself could be religiously biased and how the religious/theistic approach could work as a default cognitive mode, as Cognitive Science of Religion suggests. I would like to criticize (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  33. What Cognitive Science Tells Us About Ethics and the Teaching of Ethics.James Anderson - 1997 - Journal of Business Ethics 16 (3):279-291.
    A relatively new and exciting area of collaboration has begun between philosophy of mind and ethics. This paper attempts to explore aspects of this collaboration and how they bear upon traditional ethics. It is the author's contention that much of Western moral philosophy has been guided by largely unrecognized assumptions regarding reason, knowledge and conceptualization, and that when examined against empirical research in cognitive science, these assumptions turn out to be false -- or at the very least, unrealistic for creatures (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  34.  2
    What Machine Learning Can Tell Us About the Role of Language Dominance in the Diagnostic Accuracy of German LITMUS Non-Word and Sentence Repetition Tasks.Lina Abed Ibrahim & István Fekete - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  35.  43
    Sidetracked by Trolleys: Why Sacrificial Moral Dilemmas Tell Us Little (or Nothing) About Utilitarian Judgment.Guy Kahane - 2015 - Social Neuroscience 10 (5):551-560.
    Research into moral decision-making has been dominated by sacrificial dilemmas where, in order to save several lives, it is necessary to sacrifice the life of another person. It is widely assumed that these dilemmas draw a sharp contrast between utilitarian and deontological approaches to morality, and thereby enable us to study the psychological and neural basis of utilitarian judgment. However, it has been previously shown that some sacrificial dilemmas fail to present a genuine contrast between utilitarian and deontological options. Here, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  36.  99
    What Autism May Tell Us About Self‐Awareness: A Commentary on Frith and Happé.Diana Raffman - 1999 - Mind and Language 14 (1):23-31.
  37.  23
    What Can Psychology Tell Us About Business Ethics?David M. Messick - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (S1):73-80.
    Insights from contemporary psychology can illuminate the common psychological processes that facilitate unethical decision making. I will illustrate several of these processes and describe steps that may be taken to reduce or eliminate the undesirable consequences of these processes. A generic problem with these processes is that they are totally invisible to decision makers – i. e., decision makers are convinced that their decisions are ethically and managerially sound.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  38.  41
    What Catatonia Can Tell Us About “Top-Down Modulation”: A Neuropsychiatric Hypothesis.Georg Northoff - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (5):555-577.
    Differential diagnosis of motor symptoms, for example, akinesia, may be difficult in clinical neuropsychiatry. Symptoms may be either of neurologic origin, for example, Parkinson's disease, or of psychiatric origin, for example, catatonia, leading to a so-called “conflict of paradigms.” Despite their different origins, symptoms may appear more or less clinically similar. Possibility of dissociation between origin and clinical appearance may reflect functional brain organisation in general, and cortical-cortical/subcortical relations in particular. It is therefore hypothesized that similarities and differences between Parkinson's (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  39.  30
    What Causal Conditional Reasoning Tells Us About People's Understanding of Causality.Sieghard Beller & Gregory Kuhnmünch - 2007 - Thinking and Reasoning 13 (4):426-460.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  40.  60
    What Can Polysemy Tell Us About Theories of Explanation?Maria Şerban - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 7 (1):41-56.
    Philosophical accounts of scientific explanation are broadly divided into ontic and epistemic views. This paper explores the idea that the lexical ambiguity of the verb to explain and its nominalisation supports an ontic conception of explanation. I analyse one argument which challenges this strategy by criticising the claim that explanatory talk is lexically ambiguous, 375–394, 2012). I propose that the linguistic mechanism of transfer of meaning, 109–132, 1995) provides a better account of the lexical alternations that figure in the systematic (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  41.  10
    What Does the Brain Tell Us About Abstract Art?Vered Aviv - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  42.  41
    What Does Language Acquisition Tell Us About Language Evolution?Paul Bloom - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):553-554.
  43.  13
    What Does Noematic Intentionality Tell Us About the Ontological Status of the Noema?Eduard Marbach - 2010 - In J. J. Drummond & Lester Embree (eds.), The Phenomenology of the Noema. Springer. pp. 137-155.
  44.  20
    What Can the Lithic Record Tell Us About the Evolution of Hominin Cognition?Ross Pain - 2021 - Topoi 40 (1):245-259.
    This paper examines the inferential framework employed by Palaeolithic cognitive archaeologists, using the work of Wynn and Coolidge as a case study. I begin by distinguishing minimal-capacity inferences from cognitive-transition inferences. Minimal-capacity inferences attempt to infer the cognitive prerequisites required for the production of a technology. Cognitive-transition inferences use transitions in technological complexity to infer transitions in cognitive evolution. I argue that cognitive archaeology has typically used cognitive-transition inferences informed by minimal-capacity inferences, and that this reflects a tendency to favour (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  45.  9
    What Brains Won’T Tell Us About the Mind: A Critique of the Neurobiological Argument Against R.Richard Samuels - 1998 - Mind and Language 13 (4):548-570.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  46.  19
    What Can Written-Words Tell Us About Lexical Retrieval in Speech Production?Eduardo Navarrete, Bradford Z. Mahon, Anna Lorenzoni & Francesca Peressotti - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  47.  27
    Do Disputes Over Priority Tell Us Anything About Science?Alan G. Gross - 1998 - Science in Context 11 (2):161-179.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  48.  67
    What Can Neuroscience Tell Us About the Hard Problem of Consciousness?Dimitria Electra Gatzia & Brit Brogaard - 2016 - Frontiers in Neuroscience 10:395.
    Rapid advances in the field of neuroimaging techniques including magnetoencephalography (MEG), electroencephalography (EEG), functional MRI (fMRI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), voxel based morphomentry (VBM), and optical imaging, have allowed neuroscientists to investigate neural processes in ways that have not been possible until recently. Combining these techniques with advanced analysis procedures during different conditions such as hypnosis, psychiatric and neurological conditions, subliminal stimulation, and psychotropic drugs began transforming the study of neuroscience, ushering a new paradigm that may allow neuroscientists to tackle (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  49.  15
    What Can Psychiatric Disorders Tell Us About Neural Processing of the Self?Weihua Zhao, Lizhu Luo, Qin Li & Keith M. Kendrick - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  50.  25
    What Can Neuropsychology Tell Us About Category Learning?B. Knowlton - 1999 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (4):123-124.
1 — 50 / 1000