Results for 'Paul A. Locke'

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  1.  10
    Other Branches of Science Are Necessary to Form a Lawyer: Teaching Public Health Law in Law School.Richard A. Goodman, Zita Lazzarini, Anthony D. Moulton, Scott Burris, Nanette R. Elster, Paul A. Locke & Lawrence O. Gostin - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (2):298-301.
    Over two hundred years ago, Thomas Jefferson suggested the need for a broader legal curriculum. As the twenty-first century begins, the practice of law will increasingly demand interdisciplinary knowledge and collaboration — between those trained in law and a broad range of scientific and technical fields, including engineering, biology, genetics, ethics, and the social sciences. The practice of public health law provides a model for both the substantive integration of law with science, and for the way its practitioners work. In (...)
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  2.  9
    Other Branches of Science Are Necessary to Form a Lawyer: Teaching Public Health Law in Law School.Richard A. Goodman, Zita Lazzarini, Anthony D. Moulton, Scott Burris, Nanette R. Elster, Paul A. Locke & Lawrence O. Gostin - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (2):298-301.
    Over two hundred years ago, Thomas Jefferson suggested the need for a broader legal curriculum. As the twenty-first century begins, the practice of law will increasingly demand interdisciplinary knowledge and collaboration — between those trained in law and a broad range of scientific and technical fields, including engineering, biology, genetics, ethics, and the social sciences. The practice of public health law provides a model for both the substantive integration of law with science, and for the way its practitioners work. In (...)
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  3. Dystopian Literature: A Theory and Research Guide.M. Keith Booker, Robert A. Collins, Robert Latham, Hal W. Hall, Paul G. Haschak & George Locke - 1995 - Utopian Studies 6 (2):134-139.
  4.  48
    The Political Needs of a Toolmaking Animal: Madison, Hamilton, Locke, and the Question of Property.Paul A. Rahe - 2005 - Social Philosophy and Policy 22 (1):1-26.
    When Benjamin Franklin suggested that man is by nature a tool-making animal, he summed up what was for his fellow Americans the common sense of the matter. It is not, then, surprising that, when Britain's colonists in North America broke with the mother country over the issue of an unrepresentative parliament's right to tax and govern the colonies, they defended their right to the property they owned on the ground that it was in a most thorough-going sense an extension of (...)
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  5.  10
    Locke, Berkeley, Hume.Paul A. Reynolds - 1933 - Philosophical Review 42 (5):530.
  6. Locke on Express and Tacit Consent.Paul Russell - 1986 - Political Theory 14 (2):291-306.
    THE SUBJECT MATTER of this essay is Locke's well-known discussion of consent in sections 116-122 of the Second Treatise of Government.' I will not be concerned to discuss the place of consent in Locke's political philosophy 2 My concerns are somewhat narrower than this. I will simply be concerned to show that in important respects several recent discussions of Locke's political philosophy have misrepresented Locke's views on the subject of express and tacit consent. At theheart of (...)
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  7.  32
    John Locke on Native Right, Colonial Possession, and the Concept of Vacuum Domicilium.Paul Corcoran - 2018 - The European Legacy 23 (3):225-250.
    The early paragraphs of John Locke’s Second Treatise of Government describe a poetic idyll of property acquisition widely supposed by contemporary theorists and historians to have cast the template for imperial possessions in the New World. This reading ignores the surprises lurking in Locke’s later chapters on conquest, usurpation, and tyranny, where he affirms that native rights to lands and possessions survive to succeeding generations. Locke warned his readers that this “will seem a strange doctrine, it being (...)
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  8.  69
    John Locke and Jonathan Edwards: A Reconsideration.Paul Helm - 1969 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 7 (1):51-61.
  9. A paraphrase and notes on the Epistles of St Paul.John Locke & A. Wainwright - 1991 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 181 (1):104-105.
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  10. The Clarendon Edition of the Works of John Locke: A Paraphrase and Notes on the Epistles of St. Paul: Volume Ii.John Locke (ed.) - 1987 - Clarendon Press.
    A scholarly edition of Volume 2 of The Clarendon Edition of the Works of John Locke: A Paraphrase and Notes on the Epistles of St. Paul by Arthur Wainwright. The edition presents an authoritative text, together with an introduction, commentary notes, and scholarly apparatus.
     
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  11. John Locke: A Paraphrase and Notes on the Epistles of St. Paul: Volume Ii.Arthur W. Wainright (ed.) - 1987 - Clarendon Press.
    A scholarly edition of Volume 2 of The Clarendon Edition of the Works of John Locke: A Paraphrase and Notes on the Epistles of St. Paul by Arthur Wainwright. The edition presents an authoritative text, together with an introduction, commentary notes, and scholarly apparatus.
     
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  12. John Locke: A Paraphrase and Notes on the Epistles of St. Paul: Volume I. [REVIEW]Arthur W. Wainright (ed.) - 1987 - Clarendon Press.
    A scholarly edition of Volume 1 of The Clarendon Edition of the Works of John Locke: A Paraphrase and Notes on the Epistles of St. Paul: Corinthians, Romans, Ephesians by Arthur Wainwright. The edition presents an authoritative text, together with an introduction, commentary notes, and scholarly apparatus.
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  13. Locke’s Tracts and the Anarchy of the Religious Conscience.Paul Bou-Habib - 2015 - European Journal of Political Theory 14 (1):3-18.
    This article reconstructs the main arguments in John Locke’s first political writings, the highly rhetorical, and often obscure, Two Tracts on Government . The Tracts support the government’s right to impose religious ceremonies on its people, an astonishing fact given Locke’s famous defense of toleration in his later works. The reconstruction of the Tracts developed here allows us to see that rather than a pessimistic view of the prospects for peace under religious diversity, what mainly animates the young (...)
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  14.  62
    Locke's Theory of Personal Identity.Paul Helm - 1979 - Philosophy 54 (208):173 - 185.
    It is widely held that Locke propounded a theory of personal identity in terms of consciousness and memory. By ‘theory’ here is meant a set of necessary and sufficient conditions indicating what personal identity consists in. It is also held that this theory is open to obvious and damaging objections, so much so that it has to be supplemented in terms of bodily continuity, either because memory alone is not sufficient, or because the concept of memory is itself dependent (...)
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  15.  79
    Toward a Quantitative Description of Large-Scale Neocortical Dynamic Function and EEG.Paul L. Nunez - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (3):371-398.
    A general conceptual framework for large-scale neocortical dynamics based on data from many laboratories is applied to a variety of experimental designs, spatial scales, and brain states. Partly distinct, but interacting local processes (e.g., neural networks) arise from functional segregation. Global processes arise from functional integration and can facilitate (top down) synchronous activity in remote cell groups that function simultaneously at several different spatial scales. Simultaneous local processes may help drive (bottom up) macroscopic global dynamics observed with electroencephalography (EEG) or (...)
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  16.  20
    Locke, Sincerity and the Rationality of Persecution.Paul Bou-Habib - unknown
    According to the most influential contemporary reading of John Locke's Letter Concerning Toleration, his main argument against religious persecution is unsuccessful. That argument holds that coercion is ineffective as a means of instilling religious beliefs in its victims. I propose a different reading of the Letter. Locke's main consideration against persecution is not the unsuccessful belief-based argument just outlined, but what I call the sincerity argument. He believes that religious coercion is irrational because it is ineffective as a (...)
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  17.  22
    Locke's Way of Ideas as Context for His Theory of Education in Of the Conduct of the Understanding.Paul Schuurman - 2001 - History of European Ideas 27 (1):45-59.
    The central theme of John Locke's Of the Conduct of the Understanding is human error. The Conduct was conceived as an additional chapter to An Essay concerning Understanding, but it was never finished and published posthumously in 1706 as a separate work. Modern authors have regarded the Conduct as an educational treatise. Indeed, the analysis in this work of the nature and causes of error and the ways to prevent and remedy error gives rise to numerous educational reflections. However, (...)
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  18.  62
    Leibniz, Bayle, and Locke on Faith and Reason.Paul Lodge & Ben Crowe - 2002 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 76 (4):575-600.
    This paper illuminates Leibniz’s conception of faith and its relationship to reason. Given Leibniz’s commitment to natural religion, we might expect his view of faith to be deflationary. We show, however, that Leibniz’s conception of faith involves a significant non-rational element. We approach the issue by considering the way in which Leibniz positions himself between the views of two of his contemporaries, Bayle and Locke. Unlike Bayle, but like Locke, Leibniz argues that reason and faith are in conformity. (...)
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  19.  8
    A Paraphrase and Notes on the Epistles of St Paul.Paul Schuurman - 2010 - In S. J. Savonius-Wroth Paul Schuurman & Jonathen Walmsley (eds.), The Continuum Companion to Locke. Continuum. pp. 277.
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  20.  16
    Land-Locked Developing Countries and Their Infrastructural Challenges in Contributing to Global Ethics: A Zimbabwe Case Study.Nahal Haghbin, Sithembile Ruzario, Paul Ndebele & Teck Chuan Voo - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (10):21-24.
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  21. The Critical Pragmatism of Alain Locke: A Reader on Value Theory, Aesthetics, Community, Culture, Race, and Education.Nancy Fraser, Astrid Franke, Sally J. Scholz, Mark Helbling, Judith M. Green, Richard Shusterman, Beth J. Singer, Jane Duran, Earl L. Stewart, Richard Keaveny, Rudolph V. Vanterpool, Greg Moses, Charles Molesworth, Verner D. Mitchell, Clevis Headley, Kenneth W. Stikkers, Talmadge C. Guy, Laverne Gyant, Rudolph A. Cain, Blanche Radford Curry, Segun Gbadegesin, Stephen Lester Thompson & Paul Weithman (eds.) - 1999 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In its comprehensive overview of Alain Locke's pragmatist philosophy this book captures the radical implications of Locke's approach within pragmatism, the critical temper embedded in Locke's works, the central role of power and empowerment of the oppressed and the concept of broad democracy Locke employed.
     
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  22.  6
    Books in Review : A Fantasy of Reason : The Life a Nd Thought of Wil- Lia M God Win by Don Locke. LonDon, Boston: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1980, Pp. XI, 398. $17.50. [REVIEW]Lvman Tower Sargent - 1981 - Political Theory 9 (1):116-119.
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  23.  17
    Locke's Way of Ideas as Context for His Theory of Education in Of the Conduct of the Understanding.Paul Schuurman - 2001 - History of European Ideas 27 (1):45-59.
    The central theme of John Locke's Of the Conduct of the Understanding is human error. The Conduct was conceived as an additional chapter to An Essay concerning Understanding, but it was never finished and published posthumously in 1706 as a separate work. Modern authors have regarded the Conduct as an educational treatise. Indeed, the analysis in this work of the nature and causes of error and the ways to prevent and remedy error gives rise to numerous educational reflections. However, (...)
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  24. Book Reviews : A Kind of Life Imposed on Man: Vocation and Social Order From Tyndale to Locke, by Paul Marshall. University of Toronto Press, 1996. 163 Pp. Hb. £32.50. ISBN 0-8020-0784-8. [REVIEW]J. C. D. Clark - 1998 - Studies in Christian Ethics 11 (1):99-102.
  25.  32
    Ideas, Mental Faculties, and Method: The Logic of Ideas of Descartes and Locke and its Reception in the Dutch Republic.Paul Schuurman (ed.) - 2004 - Brill.
    This is the first comprehensive study of the early modern logic of ideas. It is also a profound contribution to our understanding of the interaction between Aristotelianism and new philosophy and between rationalism and empiricism.
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  26.  6
    NPSNET: Four User Interface Paradigms for Entity Control in a Virtual World.David Pratt, John Locke, Paul Barham & John Falby - 1995 - Journal of Intelligent Systems 5 (2-4):89-110.
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  27. Just Babies: The Origins of Good and Evil.Paul Bloom - 2013 - Crown.
    A leading cognitive scientist argues that a deep sense of good and evil is bred in the bone. From John Locke to Sigmund Freud, philosophers and psychologists have long believed that we begin life as blank moral slates. Many of us take for granted that babies are born selfish and that it is the role of society—and especially parents—to transform them from little sociopaths into civilized beings. In Just Babies, Paul Bloom argues that humans are in fact hardwired (...)
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  28.  12
    Armitage on Locke on International Theory: The Two Treatises of Government and the Right of Intervention.Paul Kelly - 2015 - History of European Ideas 41 (1):49-61.
    SummaryThe paper examines David Armitage's claim that Locke makes an important contribution to international theory by exploring the place of international relations within the Two Treatises of Government. Armitage's suggestion is that the place of international theory in Locke's canonical works is under-explored. In particular, the paper examines the implication of Locke's account of the executive power of the law of nature which allows third parties to punish breaches of the law of nature wherever they occur. The (...)
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  29.  24
    Sartre and Camus: A Historic Confrontation.Jean-Paul Sartre, Albert Camus, David Sprintzen & Adrian Van den Hoven (eds.) - 2004 - Humanity Books.
    In 1952, Jean-Paul Sartre engaged Albert Camus in a celebrated and bitter public confrontation that had wide-ranging cultural significance. The year before, Camus had challenged the prevailing political wisdom in his renowned work, The Rebel. In response he was attacked in print, first by Francis Jeanson writing in Les Temps Modernes, a journal edited by Sartre, and then by Sartre himself. In a series of highly publicized articles, these literary and cultural titans locked horns over human values, social and (...)
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  30.  63
    Natural Rights Liberalism From Locke to Nozick: Volume 22, Part 1.Ellen Frankel Paul, Fred Dycus Miller & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) - 2004 - Cambridge University Press.
    This collection of essays is dedicated to the memory of the late Harvard philosopher Robert Nozick, who died in 2002. The publication of Nozick's Anarchy, State, and Utopia in 1974 revived serious interest in natural rights liberalism, which, beginning in the latter half of the eighteenth century, had been eclipsed by a succession of antithetical political theories including utilitarianism, progressivism, and various egalitarian and collectivist ideologies. Some of our contributors critique Nozick's political philosophy. Other contributors examine earlier figures in the (...)
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  31. Natural Rights Liberalism From Locke to Nozick: Volume 22, Part 1.Ellen Frankel Paul, Fred D. Miller & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) - 2004 - Cambridge University Press.
    This collection of essays is dedicated to the memory of the late Harvard philosopher Robert Nozick, who died in 2002. The publication of Nozick's Anarchy, State, and Utopia in 1974 revived serious interest in natural rights liberalism, which, beginning in the latter half of the eighteenth century, had been eclipsed by a succession of antithetical political theories including utilitarianism, progressivism, and various egalitarian and collectivist ideologies. Some of our contributors critique Nozick's political philosophy. Other contributors examine earlier figures in the (...)
     
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  32.  25
    Owning Our Bodies? The Politics of Self-Possession and the Body of Christ (Hobbes, Locke and Paul).Bernd Wannenwetsch - 2013 - Studies in Christian Ethics 26 (1):50-65.
    This essay investigates the idea of self-proprietorship as the concealed ideological basis beneath our most fraught ethical discourses on bodily matters pertaining to birth, health, sex and death. It questions the sense in which such discourses, and their corresponding societal practices, in turn serve as a practical apology for this troubling anthropology that has come to sustain capitalism. ‘Self-proprietorship’ is analysed for its phenomenological basis in the actual task of learning to own one’s body, and traced in its early philosophical (...)
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  33.  30
    Continuity and Change in the Empiricism of John Locke and Gerardus de Vries (1648–1705).Paul Schuurman - 2007 - History of European Ideas 33 (3):292-304.
    Locke has often been hailed as the father of an empiricism that provided a philosophical basis to natural science in the Age of Enlightenment. In this article his empiricism is compared with that of the little known Dutch Aristotelian professor Gerardus de Vries. There are striking parallels between Locke's brand of mechanist empiricism and the pragmatic and flexible Aristotelianism of De Vries. These parallels put strictures on both the archaic character of the Aristotelianism embraced by De Vries and (...)
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  34.  15
    Church, Commonwealth, and Toleration: John Locke as a Reader of Paul.Holger Zaborowski - 2017 - In Antonio Cimino, George Henry van Kooten & Gert Jan van der Heiden (eds.), Saint Paul and Philosophy: The Consonance of Ancient and Modern Thought. De Gruyter. pp. 283-296.
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  35.  24
    Review of The Logic of Gersonides, a Translation of Sefer Ha-Heggesh Ha-Yashar of Rabbi Levi Ben Gershom with Introduction, Commentary, and Analytical Glossary by Charles H. Manekin. New Synthese Historical Library, Vol. 40 , Xii + 341 Pp. ISBN 0-7923-1513-8; Luigi Firpo: Il Processo di Giordano Bruno . Pp. Xxvii + 378. Hardback Only: 44,000 Liras. ISBN 88-8402-135-9.; Anthony Kenny: Descartes. A Study of His Philosophy 256 Pp. 9.99 ISBN 1 85506 236 4; A. John Simmons: The Lockean Theory of Rights , Pp. Ix, 387. £30.00. ISBN 0-691-08630-3; Ross Hutchison: Locke in France 1688-1734. The Voltaire Foundation Pp. 251. 46.00. ISBN 0-7294-0418-8; Thomas Reid: Practical Ethics: Being Lectures and Papers on Natural Religion, Self-Government, Natural Jurisprudence, and the Law of Nations Edited From the Manuscripts with an Introduction and a Commentary by Knud Haakonssen , Pp. Xvi + 556. £40.00. ISBN 0-691-07350-3; The Cambridge Companion to Kant Ed. Paul Guyer , Pp. Xii + 482 £40 Hardback, £12. [REVIEW]Desmond Henry, Hilary Gatti, Laura Benítez & Richard Ashcraft - 1995 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 3 (1):161-207.
  36. Nietzsche's Philosophical Psychology.Paul Katsafanas - 2013 - In John Richardson & Ken Gemes (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Nietzsche. Oxford University Press. pp. 727-755.
    Freud claimed that the concept of drive is "at once the most important and the most obscure element of psychological research." It is hard to think of a better proof of Freud's claim than the work of Nietzsche, which provides ample support for the idea that the drive concept is both tremendously important and terribly obscure. Although Nietzsche's accounts of agency and value everywhere appeal to drives, the concept has not been adequately explicated. I remedy this situation by providing an (...)
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  37. Fanaticism and Sacred Values.Paul Katsafanas - 2019 - Philosophers' Imprint 19:1-20.
    What, if anything, is fanaticism? Philosophers including Locke, Hume, Shaftesbury, and Kant offered an account of fanaticism, analyzing it as (1) unwavering commitment to an ideal, together with (2) unwillingness to subject the ideal (or its premises) to rational critique and (3) the presumption of a non-rational sanction for the ideal. In the first part of the paper, I explain this account and argue that it does not succeed: among other things, it entails that a paradigmatically peaceful and tolerant (...)
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  38. Online Public Shaming: Virtues and Vices.Paul Billingham & Tom Parr - 2020 - Journal of Social Philosophy 51 (3):371-390.
    We are witnessing increasing use of the Internet, particular social media, to criticize (perceived or actual) moral failings and misdemeanors. This phenomenon of so-called ‘online public shaming’ could provide a powerful tool for reinforcing valuable social norms. But it also threatens unwarranted and severe punishments meted out by online mobs. This paper analyses the dangers associated with the informal enforcement of norms, drawing on Locke, but also highlights its promise, drawing on recent discussions of social norms. We then consider (...)
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  39.  14
    Mendelssohn, Kant, and Religious Liberty.Paul Guyer - 2018 - Kant-Studien 109 (2):309-328.
    : Both Mendelssohn and Kant were strong supporters of the separation between church and state, but their arguments differed. Mendelssohn joined many others in following Locke in arguing that only freely arrived at conviction could be pleasing to God, so the state could not serve the purpose of religion in attempting to enforce it: a religious premise for religious liberty. Kant argued for religious liberty as an immediate consequence of the innate right to freedom. I suggest that Kant’s straightforward (...)
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  40. Pragmatic Method and Its Rhetorical Lineage.Paul Schollmeier - 2002 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 35 (4):368-381.
    Paul Schollmeier 1. “A new name for some old ways of thinking,” William James subtitled his most popular book. With typical diffidence, he did not hesitate to acknowledge that many earlier philosophers were cognizant of and practiced in the pragmatic method. He mentions by name not only Locke, Berkeley, and Hume but also Socrates, “who was adept at it,” and Aristotle, “who used it methodically” (1916, 50). Nor was he alone in his acknowledgement of his predecessors. Charles Sanders (...)
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  41.  31
    Paul A. Roth on The Fiction of Narrative: Essays on History, Literature, and Theory 1957–2007. By Hayden White. Edited with an Introduction by Robert Doran. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2010. Pp. 382. [REVIEW]Paul A. Roth - 2013 - History and Theory 52 (1):130-143.
    To claim that Hayden White has yet to be read seriously as a philosopher of history might seem false on the face of it. But do tropes and the rest provide any epistemic rationale for differing representations of historical events found in histories? As an explanation of White’s influence on philosophy of history, such a proffered emphasis only generates a puzzle with regard to taking White seriously, and not an answer to the question of why his efforts should be worthy (...)
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  42.  6
    Human Knowledge: Classical and Contemporary Approaches.Paul K. Moser & Arnold Vander Nat (eds.) - 2002 - Oxford University Press.
    Offering a unique and wide-ranging examination of the theory of knowledge, the new edition of this comprehensive collection deftly blends readings from the foremost classical sources with the work of important contemporary philosophical thinkers. Human Knowledge: Classical and Contemporary Approaches, 3/e, offers philosophical examinations of epistemology from ancient Greek and Roman philosophy (Plato, Aristotle, Sextus Empiricus); medieval philosophy (Augustine, Aquinas); early modern philosophy (Descartes, Locke, Leibniz, Berkeley, Hume, Reid, Kant); classical pragmatism and Anglo-American empiricism (James, Russell, Ayer, Lewis, Carnap, (...)
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  43.  11
    Persons And Perception.Leslie A. Paul - 1961 - Faber & Faber.
  44.  89
    Kant on the Theory and Practice of Autonomy.Paul Guyer - 2003 - Social Philosophy and Policy 20 (2):70-98.
    We all know what Kant means by autonomy: “the property of the will by which it is a law to itself ” , or, since any law must be universal, the condition of an agent who is “subject only to laws given by himself but still universal” . Or do we know what Kant means by autonomy? There are a number of questions here. First, Kant's initial definition of autonomy itself raises the question of why the property of the will (...)
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  45. Some Aspects of Medical Hermeneutics: The Role of Dialectic and Narrative.James D. Lock - 1990 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 11 (1).
    This essay constructs an argument for a dialectic between the scientific and clinical aspects of medicine using the hermeneutical approach of Paul Ricoeur as a theoretical and philosophical guide. Additionally, the relationship between this dialectic and narrative case histories is examined as a way of expressing this abstract and theoretical concept in more concrete terms.
     
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  46.  77
    “Hobbes Is of the Opposite Opinion” Kant and Hobbes on the Three Authorities in the State.Paul Guyer - 2012 - Hobbes Studies 25 (1):91-119.
    Like Hobbes and unlike Locke, Kant denied the possibility of a right to rebellion. But unlike Hobbes, Kant did not argue for a unitary head of state in whom legislative, judicial, and executive powers are inseparable, and thus did not believe that the executive power in a state to whom must be conceded a monopoly of coercion also defines all rights in the state. Instead, Kant insisted upon the necessary division of authority in a state into a separate legislature, (...)
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  47.  59
    Machiavelli's Liberal Republican Legacy.Paul Anthony Rahe (ed.) - 2005 - Cambridge University Press.
    The significance of Machiavelli's political thinking for the development of modern republicanism is a matter of great controversy. This reassessment examines the character of Machiavelli's own republicanism by charting his influence on Marchamont Nedham, James Harrington, John Locke, Algernon Sidney, John Trenchard, Thomas Gordon, David Hume, the baron de Montesquieu, Benjamin Franklin, George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and Alexander Hamilton. Concluding that although Machiavelli himself was not liberal, Paul Rahe argues that he did, nonetheless, set (...)
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  48.  90
    Reference and Natural Kind Terms: The Real Essence of Locke's View.P. Kyle Stanford - 1998 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 79 (1):78–97.
    J. L. Mackie's famous claim that Locke ‘anticipates’ Kripke's Causal Theory of Reference rests, I suggest, upon a pair of important misunderstandings. Contra Mackie, as well as the more recent accounts of Paul Guyer and Michael Ayers, Lockean Real Essences consist of those features of an entity from which all of its experienceable properties can be logically deduced; thus a substantival Real Essence consists of features of a Real Constitution plus logically necessary objective connections between them and features (...)
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  49. The Virtues of State Neutrality: A Defense of Liberal Politics.David Paul Mccabe - 1995 - Dissertation, Northwestern University
    In this dissertation I put forth a defense of liberalism understood in terms of the principle of state neutrality. In the first half of the dissertation, I attempt to show that a commitment to state neutrality is a central element running through the liberal tradition. I argue for this by examining closely the liberal theories offered by Locke, Mill, Hobhouse, and Rawls. In the second part, I defend liberal neutrality against two prominent criticisms: first, that it is flawed because (...)
     
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  50.  22
    Skepticism and Natural Religion in Hume's Treatise.Paul Russell - 1988 - Journal of the History of Ideas 49 (2):247.
    My principal objective in this essay will be to show that the widely held view that Hume's Treatise' is not significantly or "directly" concerned with problems of religion is seriously mistaken.2 I shall approach this issue by way of an examination of a major skeptical theme which runs throughout the Treatise, namely, Hume's skepticism regarding the powers of demonstrative reason. In this paper I shall be especially concerned to bring to light the full significance of this skeptical theme by placing (...)
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