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Paul Martin
University of Florida
  1.  17
    Flaws in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Rationale for Supporting the Development and Approval of BiDil as a Treatment for Heart Failure Only in Black Patients.George T. H. Ellison, Jay S. Kaufman, Rosemary F. Head, Paul A. Martin & Jonathan D. Kahn - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (3):449-457.
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's rationale for supporting the development and approval of BiDil for heart failure specifically in black patients was based on under-powered, post hoc subgroup analyses of two relatively old trials , which were further complicated by substantial covariate imbalances between racial groups. Indeed, the only statistically significant difference observed between black and white patients was found without any adjustment for potential confounders in samples that were unlikely to have been adequately randomized. Meanwhile, because the accepted (...)
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    Genotyping the Future: Scientists' Expectations About Race/ Ethnicity After BiDil.Richard Tutton, Andrew Smart, Paul A. Martin, Richard Ashcroft & George T. H. Ellison - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (3):464-470.
    The ongoing debate about the FDA approval of BiDil in 2005 demonstrates how the first racially/ethnically licensed drug is entangled in both Utopian and dystopian future visions about the continued saliency of race/ethnicity in science and medicine. Drawing on the sociology of expectations, this paper analyzes how scientists in the field of pharmacogenetics are constructing certain visions of the future with respect to the use of social categories of race/ethnicity and the impact of high-throughput genotyping technologies that promise to transform (...)
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    Genotyping the Future: Scientists' Expectations About Race/Ethnicity After BiDil.Richard Tutton, Andrew Smart, Paul A. Martin, Richard Ashcroft & George T. H. Ellison - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (3):464-470.
    In a recent discussion about how scientific knowledge might potentially change our understanding of the nature and extent of human genetic, cultural, or biological variation, the sociologist David Skinner identified two competing visions of the future: one that was decidedly dystopian, which conjured up a “re-racialized” future, and an opposing utopian future in which the potential for racialized thinking might be finally overcome. We can situate the ongoing debates about the congestive heart failure drug BiDil, approved by the Food and (...)
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  4. TEAM: An Experiment in the Design of Transportable Natural-Language Interfaces.Barbara J. Grosz, Douglas E. Appelt, Paul A. Martin & Fernando C. N. Pereira - 1987 - Artificial Intelligence 32 (2):173-243.
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