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Paul Conway [3]Paul Maurice Conway [2]Paul J. Conway [1]
  1.  35
    Not All Who Ponder Count Costs: Arithmetic Reflection Predicts Utilitarian Tendencies, but Logical Reflection Predicts Both Deontological and Utilitarian Tendencies.Nick Byrd & Paul Conway - 2019 - Cognition 192 (103995).
    Conventional sacrificial moral dilemmas propose directly causing some harm to prevent greater harm. Theory suggests that accepting such actions (consistent with utilitarian philosophy) involves more reflective reasoning than rejecting such actions (consistent with deontological philosophy). However, past findings do not always replicate, confound different kinds of reflection, and employ conventional sacrificial dilemmas that treat utilitarian and deontological considerations as opposite. In two studies, we examined whether past findings would replicate when employing process dissociation to assess deontological and utilitarian inclinations independently. (...)
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  2.  19
    Sacrificial Utilitarian Judgments Do Reflect Concern for the Greater Good: Clarification Via Process Dissociation and the Judgments of Philosophers.Paul Conway, Jacob Goldstein-Greenwood, David Polacek & Joshua D. Greene - 2018 - Cognition 179:241-265.
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  3.  6
    Mirror, Mirror, on the Wall, Who is Deontological? Completing Moral Dilemmas in Front of Mirrors Increases Deontological but Not Utilitarian Response Tendencies.Caleb J. Reynolds, Kassidy R. Knighten & Paul Conway - 2019 - Cognition 192:103993.
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  4.  13
    Translating Environmental Ideologies Into Action: The Amplifying Role of Commitment to Beliefs.Matthew A. Maxwell-Smith, Paul J. Conway, Joshua D. Wright & James M. Olson - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 153 (3):839-858.
    Consumers do not always follow their ideological beliefs about the need to engage in environmentally friendly consumption. We propose that Commitment to Beliefs —the general tendency to follow one’s value-based beliefs—can help identify who is most likely to follow their environmental ideologies. We predicted that CTB would amplify the effect of beliefs prescribing environmental stewardship, or neglect, on corresponding intentions, behavior, and purchasing decisions. In two studies, CTB amplified the positive and negative effects of relevant EF ideologies on EF purchase (...)
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  5.  18
    Quality of Leadership and Workplace Bullying: The Mediating Role of Social Community at Work in a Two-Year Follow-Up Study.Laura Francioli, Paul Maurice Conway, Åse Marie Hansen, Ann-Louise Holten, Matias Brødsgaard Grynderup, Roger Persson, Eva Gemzøe Mikkelsen, Giovanni Costa & Annie Høgh - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 147 (4):889-899.
    The theoretical and empirical link between leadership and workplace bullying needs further elaboration. The aim of the study is to examine the relationship between quality of leadership and the occurrence of workplace bullying 2 years later. Furthermore, we aim to examine a possible mechanism from leadership to bullying using social community at work as mediator. Using survey data that were collected at two different points in time among 1664 workers from 60 Danish workplaces, we examined the total, direct and indirect (...)
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  6.  17
    Do Personal Dispositions Affect the Relationship Between Psychosocial Working Conditions and Workplace Bullying?Laura Francioli, Annie Høgh, Paul Maurice Conway, Giovanni Costa, Robert Karasek & Åse Marie Hansen - 2016 - Ethics and Behavior 26 (6):451-469.
    There is scarce research on the interaction between psychosocial working conditions and being a target of workplace bullying with individual characteristics as a moderator. We therefore examined 3,363 employees from 60 Danish workplaces to test whether sense of coherence moderates the relationship between the job demand-control model and bullying. This work is exploratory in nature, as no previous study to assess this moderation was found. Hierarchical linear regressions showed that demand-control model was significantly associated with bullying. Sense of coherence displayed (...)
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