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  1.  22
    Moral Salience and the Role of Goodwill in Firm-Stakeholder Trust Repair.Jill A. Brown, Ann K. Buchholtz & Paul Dunn - 2016 - Business Ethics Quarterly 26 (2):181-199.
    ABSTRACT:Re-establishing trust presents a complex challenge for a firm after it commits corporate misconduct. We introduce a new construct, moral salience, which we define as the extent to which the firm’s behavior is morally noticeable to the stakeholder. Moral salience is a function of both the moral intensity of the firm’s behavior and the relational intensity of the firm-stakeholder psychological contract. We apply this moral salience construct to firm misconduct to develop a model of trust repair that is based on (...)
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  2.  13
    The Influence of Guilt Cognitions on Taxpayers’ Voluntary Disclosures.Paul Dunn, Jonathan Farrar & Cass Hausserman - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 148 (3):689-701.
    Guilt is a powerful emotion that is known to influence ethical decision-making. Nevertheless, the role of guilt cognitions in influencing restorative behaviour following an unethical action is not well understood. Guilt cognitions are interrelated beliefs about an individual’s role in a negative event. We experimentally investigate the joint impact of three guilt cognitions—responsibility for a decision, justification for a decision, and foreseeability of consequences—on a taxpayer’s decision to make a tax amnesty disclosure. Tax amnesties encourage delinquent taxpayers to self-correct to (...)
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  3.  45
    Cultural Crossvergence and Social Desirability Bias: Ethical Evaluations by Chinese and Canadian Business Students.Paul Dunn & Anamitra Shome - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (4):527-543.
    The purpose of this study is to determine whether there are cross-cultural differences between Chinese and Canadian business students with respect to their assessment of the ethicality of various business behaviors. Using a sample of 147 business students, the results indicate cultural crossvergence; the Chinese (72 students) and Canadians (75 students) exhibit different ethical attitudes toward questionable business practices at the individual level but not at the corporate level. A social desirability bias (a tendency to deny socially unacceptable actions and (...)
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  4.  13
    Corporate Public Affairs: Commitment, Resources, and Structure.Jennifer J. Griffin & Paul Dunn - 2004 - Business and Society 43 (2):196-220.
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  5.  20
    Deloitte and the Ethics of Corporate Espionage.Paul Dunn - 2018 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 29:65-70.
    The purpose of this paper is to begin a discussion of the ethical aspects of corporate espionage by examining the behaviour of a major accounting firm with respect to its acquisition of a rival consulting firm through the use of competitive intelligence. The techniques used by Deloitte were questionable. But where they unethical? Arguments are presented both pro and con with the overall conclusion that Deloitte did not act in the public interest.
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  6. Corporate Governance, Corporate Social Responsibility, and Firm Performance.Paul Dunn - 2004 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 15:203-206.
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  7.  32
    The Importance of Competency, Reputation, and Goodwill in Re-Establishing Stakeholder Relationships.Paul Dunn & Jill Brown - 2009 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 20:291-295.
    This paper provides a model on repairing re-establishing stakeholder relationships after a firm engages in a moral indiscretion. Depending upon their nature, indiscretions can be classified as mistakes, misconduct, or improprieties. After committing an indiscretion, firms can attempt to reestablish positive stakeholder relationships by strengthening their technical competency (for mistakes), improving their reputation (for misconduct), and enhancing their goodwill with relevant stakeholders (for improprieties). However, a firm’s cultural orientation may result in the misapplication of the stakeholder repair mechanism (competency, reputation, (...)
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  8.  25
    Culture and Social Desirability Bias: Ethical Evaluations by Chinese and Canadian Business Students.Paul Dunn & Anamitra Shome - 2007 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 18:12-14.
    This study finds cultural divergence among business students from Canada and the People’s Republic of China. The Chinese and Canadian students, regardless of gender, exhibit different ethical attitudes towards questionable business practices. Also, the Canadian students, especially the women, demonstrate a stronger social desirability bias (a tendency to deny socially unacceptable actions and to admit to socially desirable ones) than do the Chinese business students. Finally, this bias causes respondents to increase their assessment of the un-ethicality of questionable business activities.
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  9.  24
    The Changing Composition of Canadian Boards of Directors: The Role of Female Corporate Directors.Paul Dunn & Barbara Sainty - 2005 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 16:230-233.
    This paper reports the first stage of our research agenda concerning the factors that influence the appointment of individuals to Canadian boards of directors. This particular study begins our examination of the role of women on boards. We focus on three interrelated aspects: the characteristics of the women who are appointed to boards, the characteristics of the firm that appoints a woman to an all-male board of directors, and the relationship, if any, between female directors and corporate social behaviour. The (...)
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  10.  17
    What Should a Not-For-Profit Do When a Clean Donor Becomes Tainted?Paul Dunn - 2006 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 17:248-250.
    Assume that a not-for-profit receives a sizable donation and names a building after the donor. What should the not-for-profit do, when, at a later date, the donorbecomes tainted because of a scandal? This paper outlines a typology of donors and donations, and using stakeholder theory and resource dependency identifies three external factors (cognitive dissonance, multiple stakeholders, and recency) and three organizational factors (economic need, funding guidelines, and commitment) that would entice a NFP to adopt any one of three strategies: return (...)
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  11.  4
    The Impact of Slack Resources and Environmental Constraints on Corporate Philanthropy.Sara A. Morris & Paul Dunn - 2003 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 14:162-168.
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  12.  6
    Profit-Driven Corporate Social Responsibility as a Bayesian Real Option in Green Computing.Hemantha S. B. Herath, Tejaswini C. Herath & Paul Dunn - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 158 (2):387-402.
    The idea that socially responsible investments can be viewed in terms of real options is relatively new. We expand on this notion by demonstrating how real option theory, within a Bayesian decision-making framework, can be used by managers to help when making green technology investment decisions. The Bayesian decision framework provides a more flexible approach to investment decision making because it adjusts for new information. Responding to a call for multidisciplinary and multifaceted research in environmental sustainability, this paper integrates ethics, (...)
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  13.  6
    The Importance of Consistency in Establishing Cognitive-Based Trust: A Laboratory Experiment.Paul Dunn - 2000 - Teaching Business Ethics 4 (3):285-306.
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  14.  2
    Cross Cultural Ethical Differences.Paul Dunn & Anamitra Shome - 2002 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 13:22-25.
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  15.  4
    10.5840/Jbee20118141.Paul Dunn - 2000 - Journal of Business Ethics Education 1 (1):416-418.
  16.  1
    Have Accountants Lost the Moral Right to Conduct Audits?Paul Dunn & Ian Adamson - 2003 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 14:31-37.
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