Results for 'Paul E. Dunne'

997 found
Order:
  1.  11
    A Logical Characterisation of Qualitative Coalitional Games.Paul E. Dunne, Wiebe van der Hoek & Michael Wooldridge - 2007 - Journal of Applied Non-Classical Logics 17 (4):477-509.
    Qualitative coalitional games were introduced as abstract formal models of goal-oriented cooperative systems. A QCG is a game in which each agent is assumed to have some goal to achieve, and in which agents must typically cooperate with others in order to satisfy their goals. In this paper, we show how it is possible to reason about QCGs using Coalition Logic, a formalism intended to facilitate reasoning about coalitional powers in game-like multiagent systems. We introduce a correspondence relation between QCGs (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  2.  32
    A Value-Based Argument Model of Convention Degradation.Paul E. Dunne - 2005 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 13 (1):153-188.
    The analysis of how social conventions emerge and become established is rightly viewed as a significant study of great relevance to models of legal and social systems. Such conventions, however, do not operate in a monotonic fashion, i.e. the fact that a convention is recognised and complied with at some instant is no guarantee it will continue to be so indefinitely. In total rules and protocols may evolve, with or without the consent of individual members of the society, even to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Coherence in Finite Argument Systems.Paul E. Dunne & T. J. M. Bench-Capon - 2002 - Artificial Intelligence 141 (1-2):187-203.
  4. Characteristics of Multiple Viewpoints in Abstract Argumentation.Paul E. Dunne, Wolfgang Dvořák, Thomas Linsbichler & Stefan Woltran - 2015 - Artificial Intelligence 228:153-178.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5. Computational Properties of Argument Systems Satisfying Graph-Theoretic Constraints.Paul E. Dunne - 2007 - Artificial Intelligence 171 (10-15):701-729.
  6.  2
    Characterizing Strongly Admissible Sets.Paul E. Dunne - 2020 - Argument and Computation 11 (3):239-255.
    The concept of strong admissibility plays an important role in dialectical proof procedures for grounded semantics allowing, as it does, concise proofs that an argument belongs to the grounded extension without having necessarily to construct this extension in full. One consequence of this property is that strong admissibility ceases to be a unique status semantics. In fact it is straightforward to construct examples for which the number of distinct strongly admissible sets is exponential in the number of arguments. We are (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Parametric Properties of Ideal Semantics.Paul E. Dunne, Wolfgang Dvořák & Stefan Woltran - 2013 - Artificial Intelligence 202:1-28.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Solving Coalitional Resource Games.Paul E. Dunne, Sarit Kraus, Efrat Manisterski & Michael Wooldridge - 2010 - Artificial Intelligence 174 (1):20-50.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. The Computational Complexity of Ideal Semantics.Paul E. Dunne - 2009 - Artificial Intelligence 173 (18):1559-1591.
  10. The Complexity of Contract Negotiation.Paul E. Dunne, Michael Wooldridge & Michael Laurence - 2005 - Artificial Intelligence 164 (1-2):23-46.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  11. The Maximum Length of Prime Implicates for Instances of 3-SAT.Paul E. Dunne & Trevor J. M. Bench-Capon - 1997 - Artificial Intelligence 92 (1-2):317-329.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Two Party Immediate Response Disputes: Properties and Efficiency.Paul E. Dunne & T. J. M. Bench-Capon - 2003 - Artificial Intelligence 149 (2):221-250.
  13. Weighted Argument Systems: Basic Definitions, Algorithms, and Complexity Results.Paul E. Dunne, Anthony Hunter, Peter McBurney, Simon Parsons & Michael Wooldridge - 2011 - Artificial Intelligence 175 (2):457-486.
  14. On the Computational Complexity of Qualitative Coalitional Games.Michael Wooldridge & Paul E. Dunne - 2004 - Artificial Intelligence 158 (1):27-73.
  15. On the Computational Complexity of Coalitional Resource Games.Michael Wooldridge & Paul E. Dunne - 2006 - Artificial Intelligence 170 (10):835-871.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  16.  46
    Argumentation in AI and Law: Editors' Introduction. [REVIEW]Trevor J. M. Bench-Capon & Paul E. Dunne - 2005 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 13 (1):1-8.
  17.  15
    Toward Feasible and Efficient DNA Computation.Martyn Amos, Alan Gibbons & Paul E. Dunne - 1998 - Complexity 4 (1):20-24.
  18. Automata for Infinite Argumentation Structures.Pietro Baroni, Federico Cerutti, Paul E. Dunne & Massimiliano Giacomin - 2013 - Artificial Intelligence 203:104-150.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Audiences in Argumentation Frameworks.Trevor J. M. Bench-Capon, Sylvie Doutre & Paul E. Dunne - 2007 - Artificial Intelligence 171 (1):42-71.
  20. Algorithms for Decision Problems in Argument Systems Under Preferred Semantics.Samer Nofal, Katie Atkinson & Paul E. Dunne - 2014 - Artificial Intelligence 207:23-51.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  21.  13
    The First Survey of Attitudes of Medical Students in Ireland Towards Termination of Pregnancy.James M. Fitzgerald, Katherine E. Krause, Darya Yermak, Suzanne Dunne, Ailish Hannigan, Walter Cullen, David Meagher, Deirdre McGrath, Paul Finucane, Calvin Coffey & Colum Dunne - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (10):710-713.
    Background Since the UK Abortion Act (1967), women have travelled from Ireland to the UK for legal abortion. In 2011 >4000 women did so. Knowledge and attitudes of medical students towards abortion have been published, however, this is the first such report from Ireland. Objective To investigate medical students’ attitudes towards abortion in Ireland. Methods All medical students at the University of Limerick, and physicians who graduated from the university within the previous 12 months, were invited via email to complete (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  22. What Emotions Really Are: The Problem of Psychological Categories.Paul E. Griffiths - 1997 - University of Chicago Press.
    Paul E. Griffiths argues that most research on the emotions has been as misguided as Aristotelian efforts to study "superlunary objects" - objects...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   320 citations  
  23.  24
    Diseases Are Not Adaptations and Neither Are Their Causes: A Response to Ardern’s "Dysfunction, Disease, and the Limits of Selection".Paul E. Griffiths & John Matthewson - 2020 - Biological Theory 15 (3):136-142.
    In a recent article in this journal, Zachary Ardern criticizes our view that the most promising candidate for a naturalized criterion of disease is the "selected effects" account of biological function and dysfunction. Here we reply to Ardern’s criticisms and, more generally, clarify the relationship between adaptation and dysfunction in the evolution of health and disease.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  24.  9
    Aquinas: Moral, Political, and Legal Theory.Paul E. Sigmund & John Finnis - 2001 - Philosophical Review 110 (1):129.
  25.  35
    Wisdom and Compassion: A New Perspective on the Science of Relationships.Paul Condon, John Dunne & Christine Wilson-Mendenhall - 2019 - Journal of Moral Education 48 (1):98-108.
    In psychological science, mindfulness and compassion are thought to promote physical health, mental well-being and even virtuous character. Yet in Buddhist philosophy, mindfulness and compassion can cause suffering when the two are not balanced. One key mechanism of mindfulness is ‘dereification,’ which amounts to experiencing one’s thoughts just as thoughts and not as real representations of the world. If one focuses solely on thoughts as unreal representations, one can simply dismiss all such activity, leading to apathy. Compassion can be problematic (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  26. Experimental Ordinary Language Philosophy: A Cross-Linguistic Study of Defeasible Default Inferences.Eugen Fischer, Paul E. Engelhardt, Joachim Horvath & Hiroshi Ohtani - 2019 - Synthese 198 (2):1029-1070.
    This paper provides new tools for philosophical argument analysis and fresh empirical foundations for ‘critical’ ordinary language philosophy. Language comprehension routinely involves stereotypical inferences with contextual defeaters. J.L. Austin’s Sense and Sensibilia first mooted the idea that contextually inappropriate stereotypical inferences from verbal case-descriptions drive some philosophical paradoxes; these engender philosophical problems that can be resolved by exposing the underlying fallacies. We build on psycholinguistic research on salience effects to explain when and why even perfectly competent speakers cannot help making (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  27.  91
    Unto Others: The Evolution and Psychology of Unselfish Behavior.Paul E. Griffiths - 2002 - Mind 111 (441):178-182.
  28. Evolutionary Debunking Arguments in Three Domains: Fact, Value, and Religion.S. Wilkins John & E. Griffiths Paul - 2012 - In James Maclaurin Greg Dawes (ed.), A New Science of Religion. Routledge.
    Ever since Darwin people have worried about the sceptical implications of evolution. If our minds are products of evolution like those of other animals, why suppose that the beliefs they produce are true, rather than merely useful? We consider this problem for beliefs in three different domains: religion, morality, and commonsense and scientific claims about matters of empirical fact. We identify replies to evolutionary scepticism that work in some domains but not in others. One reply is that evolution can be (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  29.  15
    The Weighted Coherence Theory of Rationality and Justification: A Critique and an Alternative.Paul E. Tibbetts - 1980 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 10 (3):259-272.
  30.  38
    The Anterior Cingulate Cortex, Akinetic Mutism, and Human Volition.Paul E. Tibbetts - 2001 - Brain and Mind 2 (3):323-341.
    The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC)has been identified as part of a supervisoryattentional network for selecting alternativemotor programs in response to top-down corticalprocessing, particularly in situationsinvolving conflicting cognitive tasks.Bilateral lesions to the ACC may be causallyassociated with akinetic mutism, where patientsare unable to voluntarily initiate responses.The clinical and neuroanatomical evidence forthis presumed causal association is examined atlength. However, given the many reciprocalprojections between cerebral, motor, limbic andparalimbic structures within the executivesupervisory network, the association ofvoluntary behavior with a particular structure(the ACC) is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  31. Functional Analysis and Proper Functions.Paul E. Griffiths - 1993 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 44 (3):409-422.
    The etiological approach to ‘proper functions’ in biology can be strengthened by relating it to Robert Cummins' general treatment of function ascription. The proper functions of a biological trait are the functions it is assigned in a Cummins-style functional explanation of the fitness of ancestors. These functions figure in selective explanations of the trait. It is also argued that some recent etiological theories include inaccurate accounts of selective explanation in biology. Finally, a generalization of the notion of selective explanation allows (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   127 citations  
  32. Squaring the Circle: Natural Kinds with Historical Essences.Paul E. Griffiths - 1999 - In Robert A. Wilson (ed.), Species: New Interdisciplinary Essays. MIT Press. pp. 209-228.
  33. What is Innateness?Paul E. Griffiths - 2001 - The Monist 85 (1):70-85.
    In behavioral ecology some authors regard the innateness concept as irretrievably confused whilst others take it to refer to adaptations. In cognitive psychology, however, whether traits are 'innate' is regarded as a significant question and is often the subject of heated debate. Several philosophers have tried to define innateness with the intention of making sense of its use in cognitive psychology. In contrast, I argue that the concept is irretrievably confused. The vernacular innateness concept represents a key aspect of 'folkbiology', (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   98 citations  
  34.  82
    Measuring Causal Specificity.Paul E. Griffiths, Arnaud Pocheville, Brett Calcott, Karola Stotz, Hyunju Kim & Rob Knight - 2015 - Philosophy of Science 82 (4):529-555.
    Several authors have argued that causes differ in the degree to which they are ‘specific’ to their effects. Woodward has used this idea to enrich his influential interventionist theory of causal explanation. Here we propose a way to measure causal specificity using tools from information theory. We show that the specificity of a causal variable is not well-defined without a probability distribution over the states of that variable. We demonstrate the tractability and interest of our proposed measure by measuring the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   31 citations  
  35. James E. Cross, Cambridge Pembroke College MS. 25: A Carolingian Sermonary Used by Anglo-Saxon Preachers.(King's College London Medieval Studies, 1.) London: King's College, 1987. Paper. Pp. Viii, 252.£ 8.75 (Plus Postage and Handling). [REVIEW]Paul E. Szarmach - 1991 - Speculum 66 (1):143-145.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. Evolution, Dysfunction, and Disease: A Reappraisal: Table 1.Paul E. Griffiths & John Matthewson - 2018 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 69 (2):301-327.
    Some ‘naturalist’ accounts of disease employ a biostatistical account of dysfunction, whilst others use a ‘selected effect’ account. Several recent authors have argued that the biostatistical account offers the best hope for a naturalist account of disease. We show that the selected effect account survives the criticisms levelled by these authors relatively unscathed, and has significant advantages over the BST. Moreover, unlike the BST, it has a strong theoretical rationale and can provide substantive reasons to decide difficult cases. This is (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  37.  23
    “Without Running Riot”: Kant, Analogical Language, and Theological Discourse.Paul E. Stroble - 1993 - Sophia 32 (3):57-73.
  38. Genes in the Postgenomic Era.Paul E. Griffiths & Karola Stotz - 2006 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 27 (6):499-521.
    We outline three very different concepts of the gene—instrumental, nominal, and postgenomic. The instrumental gene has a critical role in the construction and interpretation of experiments in which the relationship between genotype and phenotype is explored via hybridization between organisms or directly between nucleic acid molecules. It also plays an important theoretical role in the foundations of disciplines such as quantitative genetics and population genetics. The nominal gene is a critical practical tool, allowing stable communication between bioscientists in a wide (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   51 citations  
  39.  10
    The Old English Vision of St. Paul. Antonette diPaolo Healey.Paul E. Szarmach - 1980 - Speculum 55 (3):580-581.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  36
    III. Basic Emotions, Complex Emotions, Machiavellian Emotions1: Paul E. Griffiths.Paul E. Griffiths - 2003 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 52:39-67.
    According to the distinguished philosopher Richard Wollheim, an emotion is an extended mental episode that originates when events in the world frustrate or satisfy a pre-existing desire. This leads the subject to form an attitude to the world which colours their future experience, leading them to attend to one aspect of things rather than another, and to view the things they attend to in one light rather than another. The idea that emotions arise from the satisfaction or frustration of desires—the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  41. Function, Homology and Character Individuation.Paul E. Griffiths - 2006 - Philosophy of Science 73 (1):1-25.
    I defend the view that many biological categories are defined by homology against a series of arguments designed to show that all biological categories are defined, at least in part, by selected function. I show that categories of homology are `abnormality inclusive'—something often alleged to be unique to selected function categories. I show that classifications by selected function are logically dependent on classifications by homology, but not vice-versa. Finally, I reject the view that biologists must use considerations of selected function (...)
    Direct download (15 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   45 citations  
  42. Modularity, and the Psychoevolutionary Theory of Emotion.Paul E. Griffiths - 1990 - Biology and Philosophy 5 (2):175-196.
    It is unreasonable to assume that our pre-scientific emotion vocabulary embodies all and only those distinctions required for a scientific psychology of emotion. The psychoevolutionary approach to emotion yields an alternative classification of certain emotion phenomena. The new categories are based on a set of evolved adaptive responses, or affect-programs, which are found in all cultures. The triggering of these responses involves a modular system of stimulus appraisal, whose evoluations may conflict with those of higher-level cognitive processes. Whilst the structure (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   67 citations  
  43. Emotions as Natural and Normative Kinds.Paul E. Griffiths - 2004 - Philosophy of Science 71 (5):901-911.
    In earlier work I have claimed that emotion and some emotions are not `natural kinds'. Here I clarify what I mean by `natural kind', suggest a new and more accurate term, and discuss the objection that emotion and emotions are not descriptive categories at all, but fundamentally normative categories.
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   44 citations  
  44.  89
    Using Meta‐Scientific Studies to Clarify or Resolve Questions in the Philosophy and History of Science.David Faust & Paul E. Meehl - 2002 - Proceedings of the Philosophy of Science Association 2002 (3):S185-S196.
    More powerful methods for studying and integrating the historical track record of scientific episodes and scientific judgment, or what Faust and Meehl describe as a program of meta‐science and meta‐scientific studies, can supplement and extend more commonly used case study methods. We describe the basic premises of meta‐science, overview methodological considerations, and provide examples of meta‐scientific studies. Meta‐science can help to clarify or resolve long‐standing questions in the history and philosophy of science and provide practical help to the working scientist.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  45. On the Logic of the Ontological Argument.Paul E. Oppenheimer & Edward N. Zalta - 1991 - Philosophical Perspectives 5:509-529.
    In this paper, the authors show that there is a reading of St. Anselm's ontological argument in Proslogium II that is logically valid (the premises entail the conclusion). This reading takes Anselm's use of the definite description "that than which nothing greater can be conceived" seriously. Consider a first-order language and logic in which definite descriptions are genuine terms, and in which the quantified sentence "there is an x such that..." does not imply "x exists". Then, using an ordinary logic (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   33 citations  
  46. What is the Developmentalist Challenge?Paul E. Griffiths & Robin D. Knight - 1998 - Philosophy of Science 65 (2):253-258.
  47.  68
    The Historical Turn in the Study of Adaptation.Paul E. Griffiths - 1996 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 47 (4):511-532.
    A number of philosophers and ‘evolutionary psychologists’ have argued that attacks on adaptationism in contemporary biology are misguided. These thinkers identify anti-adaptationism with advocacy of non-adaptive modes of explanation. They overlook the influence of anti-adaptationism in the development of more rigorous forms of adaptive explanation. Many biologists who reject adaptationism do not reject Darwinism. Instead, they have pioneered the contemporary historical turn in the study of adaptation. One real issue which remains unresolved amongst these methodological advances is the nature of (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   65 citations  
  48.  63
    The Cultural Evolution of Emergent Group-Level Traits.Paul E. Smaldino - 2014 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (3):243-254.
    Many of the most important properties of human groups – including properties that may give one group an evolutionary advantage over another – are properly defined only at the level of group organization. Yet at present, most work on the evolution of culture has focused solely on the transmission of individual-level traits. I propose a conceptual extension of the theory of cultural evolution, particularly related to the evolutionary competition between cultural groups. The key concept in this extension is the emergent (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  49.  3
    Introduction to Islamic Theology and Law.Paul E. Walker, Ignaz Goldziher, Andras Hamori, Ruth Hamori & Bernard Lewis - 1983 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 103 (4):761.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  50. Crossing the Milvian Bridge: When Do Evolutionary Explanations of Belief Debunk Belief?Paul E. Griffiths & John S. Wilkins - 2015 - In Phillip R. Sloan, Gerald McKenny & Kathleen Eggleson (eds.), Darwin in the Twenty-First Century: Nature, Humanity, and God. University of Notre Dame Press. pp. 201-231.
    Ever since Darwin people have worried about the sceptical implications of evolution. If our minds are products of evolution like those of other animals, why suppose that the beliefs they produce are true, rather than merely useful? In this chapter we apply this argument to beliefs in three different domains: morality, religion, and science. We identify replies to evolutionary scepticism that work in some domains but not in others. The simplest reply to evolutionary scepticism is that the truth of beliefs (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
1 — 50 / 997