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Paul H. Lysaker [10]Paul Henry Lysaker [1]
  1.  17
    Know Yourself and You Shall Know the Other… to a Certain Extent: Multiple Paths of Influence of Self-Reflection on Mindreading☆.Giancarlo Dimaggio, Paul H. Lysaker, Antonino Carcione, Giuseppe Nicolò & Antonio Semerari - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (3):778-789.
    Social and neurocognitive research suggests that thinking about one’s own thinking and thinking about the thinking of others—termed ‘mindreading’, ‘metacognition’, ‘social cognition’ or ‘mentalizing’ are not identical activities. The ability though to think about thinking in the first person is nevertheless related to the ability to think about other’s thoughts in the third person. Unclear is how these phenomena influence one another. In this review, we explore how self-reflection and autobiographical memory influence the capacity to think about the thoughts and (...)
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  2.  15
    Overcoming Fragmentation in the Treatment of Persons with Schizophrenia.Jay A. Hamm, Benjamin Buck, Bethany L. Leonhardt, Sally Wasmuth, John T. Lysaker & Paul H. Lysaker - 2017 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 37 (1):21-33.
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  3.  20
    Impaired Self-Reflection in Psychiatric Disorders Among Adults: A Proposal for the Existence of a Network of Semi Independent Functions.Giancarlo Dimaggio, Stijn Vanheule, Paul H. Lysaker, Antonino Carcione & Giuseppe Nicolò - 2009 - Consciousness and Cognition 18 (3):653-664.
    Self-reflection plays a key role in healthy human adaptation. Self-reflection might involve different capacities which may be impaired to different degrees relatively independently of one another. Variation in abilities for different forms of self-reflection are commonly seen as key aspects of many adult mental disorders. Yet little has been written about whether there are different kinds of deficits in self-reflection found in mental illness, how those deficits should be distinguished from one another and how to characterize the extent to which (...)
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  4.  18
    Reconciling the Ipseity-Disturbance Model with the Presence of Painful Affect in Schizophrenia.Jay A. Hamm, Benjamin Buck & Paul H. Lysaker - 2015 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 22 (3):197-208.
    Theoretical models of schizophrenia have traditionally emphasized the biological social, and environmental forces that lead to the dysfunction that characterizes this disorder. However important these aspects may be, an understanding of schizophrenia is incomplete without attention to the first-person perspective of those who continue to struggle to find meaning and security in the midst of this disorder. Encouragingly, an interest has grown steadily in recent years in understanding subjective experience in schizophrenia, and can be found within a range of bodies (...)
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  5.  7
    Deficits in the Ability to Recognize One’s Own Affects and Those of Others: Associations with Neurocognition, Symptoms and Sexual Trauma Among Persons with Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders.Paul H. Lysaker, Andrew Gumley, Martin Brüne, Stijn Vanheule, Kelly D. Buck & Giancarlo Dimaggio - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1183-1192.
    While many with schizophrenia experience deficits in metacognition it is unclear whether those deficits are related to other features of illness. To explore this issue, the current study classified participants with schizophrenia as possessing a deficit in both awareness of their own emotions and those of others , aware of their own emotions but unaware of the emotions of others and aware of their own emotions and of other’s emotions . Groups were compared on assessments of neurocognitive function, symptoms, and (...)
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  6.  18
    Narrative Accounts of Illness in Schizophrenia: Association of Different Forms of Awareness with Neurocognition and Social Function Over Time.Paul H. Lysaker, Jack Tsai, Alyssa M. Maulucci & Giovanni Stanghellini - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (4):1143-1151.
    Awareness of illness in schizophrenia reflects complex storied understanding of the impact of the disorder upon one’s life. Individuals may be aware of their illness in different ways and this may be related to their functioning. A total of 76 adults with schizophrenia were assessed for their awareness of illness, neurocognition, social cognition, and social function concurrently and social function was also assessed at three later time points. A cluster analysis revealed 3 groups: generally full awareness, generally limited awareness, and (...)
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  7.  54
    Schizophrenia and the Experience of Intersubjectivity as Threat.Paul Henry Lysaker, Jason K. Johannesen & John Timothy Lysaker - 2005 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 4 (3):335-352.
    Many with schizophrenia find social interactions a profound and terrifying threat to their sense of self. To better understand this we draw upon dialogical models of the self that suggest that those with schizophrenia have difficulty sustaining dialogues among diverse aspects of self. Because interpersonal exchanges solicit and evoke movement among diverse aspects of self, many with schizophrenia may consequently find those exchanges overwhelming, resulting in despair, the sensation of fusion with another, and/or self-dissolution. In short, compromised dialogical capacities may (...)
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  8.  19
    Mentalizing in Schizophrenia is More Than Just Solving Theory of Mind Tasks.Giancarlo Dimaggio, Raffaele Popolo, Giampaolo Salvatore & Paul H. Lysaker - 2013 - Frontiers in Psychology 4.
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  9.  14
    Self-Experience in Schizophrenia: Metacognition as a Construct to Advance Understanding.Jay A. Hamm, Benjamin Buck & Paul H. Lysaker - 2015 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 22 (3):217-220.
    In our original piece, we suggested that contemporary phenomenological models of schizophrenia such as the ipseity-disturbance model emphasize perceptual and cognitive elements of self-disturbances, potentially neglecting the presence and central importance of painful affect in the experience of schizophrenia. We concluded that integrating affect within developing phenomenological models would offer not only a theoretical advance but also a possible path to more effective recovery-oriented treatment. In response, Phillips agrees there is incontrovertible evidence of painful affect central to the experience of (...)
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  10.  12
    Anhedonia in Prolonged Schizophrenia Spectrum Patients with Relatively Lower Vs. Higher Levels of Depression Disorders: Associations with Deficits in Social Cognition and Metacognition.Kelly D. Buck, Hamish J. McLeod, Andrew Gumley, Giancarlo Dimaggio, Benjamin E. Buck, Kyle S. Minor, Alison V. James & Paul H. Lysaker - 2014 - Consciousness and Cognition 29:68-75.
  11.  6
    Metacognition, Selfexperience and the Prospect of Enhancing Selfmanagement in Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders.Paul H. Lysaker & John T. Lysaker - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 24 (2):169-178.
    In general, current biomedical models of schizophrenia focus on distinguishing discrete elements that, on their own or in combination with others, might lead to some form of disability. These different and potentially autonomous aspects of the disorder that might disrupt daily activities include positive and negative symptoms as well as disturbances in neurocognitive and psychobiological processes. Such disturbances include genetic vulnerabilities that increase the risk of abnormalities in brain development, and resultant neurocognitive deficits which interfere with the ability to carry (...)
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