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  1.  9
    Women’s Reaction to Opposite- and Same-Sex Infidelity in Three Cultures.Scott W. Semenyna, Francisco R. Gómez Jiménez & Paul L. Vasey - 2021 - Human Nature 32 (2):450-469.
    Previous research indicates that Euro-American women are more upset by imagining their male partners committing homosexual infidelities than heterosexual ones. The present studies sought to replicate these findings and extend them to two non-Western cultures wherein masculine men frequently engage in sexual interactions with feminine third-gender males. Across six studies in three cultural locales, women were asked to rate their degree of upset when imagining that their partner committed infidelity that was heterosexual in nature, as well as infidelity that was (...)
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  2. Materteral and Avuncular Tendencies in Samoa.Paul L. Vasey & Doug P. VanderLaan - 2009 - Human Nature 20 (3):269-281.
    Androphilia refers to sexual attraction and arousal to adult males, whereas gynephilia refers to sexual attraction and arousal to adult females. In Independent Samoa, androphilic males, most of whom are effeminate or transgendered, are referred to as fa’afafine, which means “in the manner of a woman.” Previous research has established that fa’afafine report significantly higher avuncular tendencies relative to gynephilic men. We hypothesized that Samoan fa’afafine might adopt feminine gender role orientations with respect to childcare activity. If so, then the (...)
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  3.  2
    Occupational Preferences and Recalled Childhood Sex-Atypical Behavior Among Istmo Zapotec Men, Women, and Muxes.Francisco R. Gómez Jiménez, Lucas Court & Paul L. Vasey - 2021 - Human Nature 32 (4):729-747.
    Research has found that both cisgender and transgender androphilic males (i.e., males sexually attracted to and aroused by other adult males) have female-typical occupational preferences when compared with gynephilic males (i.e., males sexually attracted to and aroused by adult females). Moreover, whereas cisgender androphilic males’ occupational preferences tend to be intermediate between those of gynephilic men and androphilic women, transgender androphilic males tend to have occupational preferences that are more similar to androphilic women. No study has directly compared both types (...)
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  4.  24
    Male Androphilia in the Ancestral Environment.Doug P. VanderLaan, Zhiyuan Ren & Paul L. Vasey - 2013 - Human Nature 24 (4):375-401.
    The kin selection hypothesis posits that male androphilia (male sexual attraction to adult males) evolved because androphilic males invest more in kin, thereby enhancing inclusive fitness. Increased kin-directed altruism has been repeatedly documented among a population of transgendered androphilic males, but never among androphilic males in other cultures who adopt gender identities as men. Thus, the kin selection hypothesis may be viable if male androphilia was expressed in the transgendered form in the ancestral past. Using the Standard Cross-Cultural Sample (SCCS), (...)
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  5.  11
    The Relationship Between Adult Occupational Preferences and Childhood Gender Nonconformity Among Samoan Women, Men, and Fa’Afafine.Scott W. Semenyna & Paul L. Vasey - 2016 - Human Nature 27 (3):283-295.
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  6.  3
    Intra- and Intersexual Mate Competition in Two Cultures.Scott W. Semenyna, Francisco R. Gómez Jiménez & Paul L. Vasey - 2022 - Human Nature 33 (2):145-171.
    The present study examined women’s mate competition tactics in response to female and feminine-male rivals in two cultures in which competition against both occurs. In Samoa and the Istmo Zapotec (Southern Mexico), women not only compete with other women (intrasexually) but also compete with rival feminine males (_intersexually_) in order to access/retain the same masculine men as sexual/romantic partners. Using a mixed-method paradigm, women were asked about their experiences of intra- and intersexual mate competition, and these narratives were recorded. The (...)
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