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Paul M. Livingston [16]Paul Michael Livingston [1]
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Profile: Paul Livingston (University of New Mexico)
  1. Agamben, Badiou, and Russell.Paul M. Livingston - 2009 - Continental Philosophy Review 42 (3):297-325.
    Giorgio Agamben and Alain Badiou have both recently made central use of set-theoretic results in their political and ontological projects. As I argue in the paper, one of the most important of these to both thinkers is the paradox of set membership discovered by Russell in 1901. Russell’s paradox demonstrates the fundamentally paradoxical status of the totality of language itself, in its concrete occurrence or taking-place in the world. The paradoxical status of language is essential to Agamben’s discussions of the (...)
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  2.  39
    Philosophy and the Vision of Language.Paul M. Livingston - 2008 - Routledge.
    Early analytic philosophy -- Radical translation and intersubjective practice -- Critical outcome.
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  3.  58
    Naturalism, Conventionalism, and Forms of Life: Wittgenstein and the "Cratylus".Paul M. Livingston - 2015 - Nordic Wittgenstein Review 4 (2):7-38.
    I consider Plato’s argument, in the dialogue Cratylus, against both of two opposed views of the “correctness of names.” The first is a conventionalist view, according to which this relationship is arbitrary, the product of a free inaugural decision made at the moment of the first institution of names. The second is a naturalist view, according to which the correctness of names is initially fixed and subsequently maintained by some kind of natural assignment, rooted in the things themselves. I argue (...)
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  4. Husserl and Schlick on the Logical Form of Experience.Paul M. Livingston - 2002 - Synthese 132 (3):239-272.
    Over a period of several decades spanning the origin of the Vienna Circle, Schlick repeatedly attacked Husserl''s phenomenological method for its reliance on the ability to intuitively grasp or see essences. Aside from its significance for phenomenologists, the attack illuminates significant and little-explored tensions in the history of analytic philosophy as well. For after coming under the influence of Wittgenstein, Schlick proposed to replace Husserl''s account of the epistemology of propositions describing the overall structure of experience with his own account (...)
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  5. Functionalism and Logical Analysis.Paul M. Livingston - 2005 - In David Woodruff Smith & Amie L. Thomasson (eds.), Phenomenology and Philosophy of Mind. Oxford: Clarendon Press. pp. 19.
    After more than thirty-five years of debate and discussion, versions of the functionalist theory of mind originating in the work of Hilary Putnam, Jerry Fodor, and David Lewis still remain the most popular positions among philosophers of mind on the nature of mental states and processes. Functionalism has enjoyed such popularity owing, at least in part, to its claim to offer a plausible and compelling description of the nature of the mental that is also consistent with an underlying physicalist or (...)
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  6. Heidegger on Information Technology.Paul M. Livingston - unknown
    My aim in this paper is to begin a discussion about how, and to what extent, Martin Heidegger’s thinking about technology offers helpful critical terms for thinking about the nature and global sway of today’s most dominant and prevalent forms of technology, namely the interrelated technologies of information, communication, and (capitalist) commerce. My suggestion will be that Heidegger’s thought does indeed have implications for critical thinking about these technologies, but that in order to see how it does, we may have (...)
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  7. Russellian and Wittgensteinian Atomism.Paul M. Livingston - 2001 - Philosophical Investigations 24 (1):30–54.
    The distinct logical atomisms of Russell and Wittgenstein represent the origin of much that is characteristic of analytic philosophy. They inaugurate the project of logical analysis of ordinary propositions, and provide the first general articulation in the analytic tradition of the connection between the logical form of meaning and the overall structure of the world. For both thinkers, this connection depends on the atomistic doctrine that there is a class of simple things from which everything else is composed, or upon (...)
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  8.  69
    Plato's Account of Falsehood: A Study of the Sophist, by Paolo Crivelli.Paul M. Livingston - 2013 - Ancient Philosophy 33 (2):431-438.
  9. Review of Alain Badiou, Logics of Worlds: Being and Event Ii[REVIEW]Paul M. Livingston - 2009 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (10).
    If it is reasonable to hope that the current moment in philosophy may ultimately represent one of transition, from the divided remnants of the still enduring "split" between "analytic" and "continental" philosophy to some form (or forms) of twenty-first century philosophy that is no longer recognizably either (or is both), it seems likely as well that the thought and work of Alain Badiou can play a key role in articulating this much needed transition. One of the central innovations of Badiou's (...)
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  10. Experience and Structure: Philosophical History and the Problem of Consciousness.Paul M. Livingston - 2002 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (3):15-33.
    Investigation and analysis of the history of the concepts employed in contemporary philosophy of mind could significantly change the contemporary debate about the explainability of consciousness. Philosophical investigation of the history of the concept of qualia and the concept of scientific explanation most often presupposed in contemporary discussions of consciousness reveals the origin of both concepts in some of the most interesting philosophical debates of the twentieth century. In particular, a historical investigation of the inheritance of concepts of the elements (...)
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  11.  3
    Russellian and Wittgensteinian Atomism.Paul M. Livingston - 2001 - Philosophical Investigations 24 (1):30-54.
    One difference between Russell’s logical atomism in The Philosophy of Logical Atomism and Wittgenstein’s in the Tractatus is that Russell’s doctrine is explicitly epistemological, whereas Wittgenstein’s is not; another difference is that Wittgenstein gives an a priori argument for the doctrine of logical atomism whereas Russell gives no such argument. I argue that these two differences are instructively connected: Russell’s focus on epistemology prevents him from being able to give a motivated argument for the truth of logical atomism. Furthermore, I (...)
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  12.  22
    Volume 2.Paul M. Livingston - unknown
    Within contemporary analytic philosophy, at least, varieties of “naturalism” have attained a widespread dominance. In this essay I suggest, however, that a closer look at the history of the linguistic turn in philosophy can offer helpful terms for rethinking what we mean in applying the categories of “nature” and “culture” within a philosophical reflection on human life and practice. For, as I argue, the central experience of this history—namely, philosophy’s transformative encounter with what it envisions as the logical or conceptual (...)
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  13. Beyond the Analytic-Continental Divide: Pluralist Philosophy in the Twenty-First Century.Jeffery A. Bell, Andrew Cutrofello & Paul M. Livingston (eds.) - 2015 - Routledge.
    This forward-thinking collection presents new work that looks beyond the division between the analytic and continental philosophical traditions—one that has long caused dissension, mutual distrust, and institutional barriers to the development of common concerns and problems. Rather than rehearsing the causes of the divide, contributors draw upon the problems, methods, and results of both traditions to show what post-divide philosophical work looks like in practice. Ranging from metaphysics and philosophy of mind to political philosophy and ethics, the papers gathered here (...)
     
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  14. Beyond the Analytic-Continental Divide: Pluralist Philosophy in the Twenty-First Century.A. Bell Jeffrey, Cutrofello Andrew & M. Livingston Paul (eds.) - 2015 - Routledge.
    This forward-thinking collection presents new work that looks beyond the division between the analytic and continental philosophical traditions—one that has long caused dissension, mutual distrust, and institutional barriers to the development of common concerns and problems. Rather than rehearsing the causes of the divide, contributors draw upon the problems, methods, and results of both traditions to show what post-divide philosophical work looks like in practice. Ranging from metaphysics and philosophy of mind to political philosophy and ethics, the papers gathered here (...)
     
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  15. Univocity, Duality, and Ideal Genesis: Deleuze and Plato.John Bova & Paul M. Livingston - 2017 - In Abraham Jacob Greenstine & Ryan J. Johnson (eds.), Contemporary Encounters with Ancient Metaphysics. Edinburgh University Press.
    In this essay, we consider the formal and ontological implications of one specific and intensely contested dialectical context from which Deleuze’s thinking about structural ideal genesis visibly arises. This is the formal/ontological dualism between the principles, ἀρχαί, of the One (ἕν) and the Indefinite/Unlimited Dyad (ἀόριστος δυάς), which is arguably the culminating achievement of the later Plato’s development of a mathematical dialectic.3 Following commentators including Lautman, Oskar Becker, and Kenneth M. Sayre, we argue that the duality of the One and (...)
     
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  16. Philosophical History and the Problem of Consciousness.Paul M. Livingston - 2004 - Cambridge University Press.
    The problem of explaining consciousness remains a problem about the meaning of language: the ordinary language of consciousness in which we define and express our sensations, thoughts, dreams and memories. This book argues that the problem arises from a quest that has taken shape over the twentieth century, and that the analysis of history provides new resources for understanding and resolving it. Paul Livingston traces the development of the characteristic practices of analytic philosophy to problems about the relationship of experience (...)
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