5 found
Order:
  1.  2
    Toddlers Infer Unobserved Causes for Spontaneous Events.Paul Muentener & Laura Schulz - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2.  1
    The Intention-to-CAUSE Bias: Evidence From Children’s Causal Language.Paul Muentener & Laura Lakusta - 2011 - Cognition 119 (3):341-355.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3.  2
    The Efficiency of Infants' Exploratory Play Is Related to Longer-Term Cognitive Development.Paul Muentener, Elise Herrig & Laura Schulz - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  9
    The Invisible Hand: Toddlers Connect Probabilistic Events With Agentive Causes.Yang Wu, Paul Muentener & Laura E. Schulz - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (8):1854-1876.
    Children posit unobserved causes when events appear to occur spontaneously. What about when events appear to occur probabilistically? Here toddlers saw arbitrary causal relationships in a fixed, alternating order. The relationships were then changed in one of two ways. In the Deterministic condition, the event order changed ; in the Probabilistic condition, the causal relationships changed. As intended, toddlers looked equally long at both changes. We then introduced a previously unseen candidate cause. Toddlers looked longer at the appearance of a (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  5
    Does Making Something Move Matter? Representations of Goals and Sources in Motion Events With Causal Sources.Laura Lakusta, Paul Muentener, Lauren Petrillo, Noelle Mullanaphy & Lauren Muniz - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (7):814-826.
    Previous studies have shown a robust bias to express the goal path over the source path when describing events. Motivated by linguistic theory, this study manipulated the causal structure of events and measured the extent to which adults and 3.5- to 4-year-old English-speaking children included the goal and source in their descriptions. We found that both children's and adults’ encoding of the source increased for events in which the source caused the motion of the figure compared to nearly identical events (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark