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  1. Divine Action, Providence, and Adam Smith's Invisible Hand.Paul Oslington - 2011 - In Adam Smith as Theologian. Routledge.
  2. The Future Hope in Adam Smith’s System.Paul Oslington - 2011 - Studies in Christian Ethics 24 (3):329-349.
    Many of the contemporary global challenges we face involve economics, and theologians serving the contemporary church cannot escape an engagement with economics. This paper explores the place of future hope in economics through an examination of Adam Smith’s treatment of the topic. It begins by outlining the eighteenth-century theological background of Smith’s work, including Stoicism, the Newtonian tradition of natural theology, and the Calvinism of the Scottish Enlightenment moderates. It argues that the future hope plays an important (and neglected) role (...)
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    Adam Smith as Theologian.Paul Oslington (ed.) - 2011 - Routledge.
    Adam Smith wrote in a Scotland where Calvinism, Continental natural law theory, Stoic philosophy, and the Newtonian tradition of scientific natural theology were key to the intellectual lives of his contemporaries. But what impact did these ideas have on Smith's system? What was Smith's understanding of nature, divine providence, and theodicy? How was the new discourse of political economy positioned in relation to moral philosophy and theology? In this volume a team of distinguished contributors consider Smith's work in relation to (...)
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    God and the Market: Adam Smith’s Invisible Hand. [REVIEW]Paul Oslington - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 108 (4):429 - 438.
    The invisible hand image is at the centre of contemporary debates about capacities of markets, on which discussion of many other topics in business ethics rests. However, its meaning in Adam Smith's writings remains obscure, particularly the religious associations that were obvious to early readers. He drew on Isaac Newton's theories of divine action and providence, mediated through the moderate Calvinism of the eighteenth century Scottish circles in which he moved. I argue within the context of Smith's general providential account (...)
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    God and the Market: Adam Smith’s Invisible Hand.Paul Oslington - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 108 (4):429-438.
    The invisible hand image is at the centre of contemporary debates about capacities of markets, on which discussion of many other topics in business ethics rests. However, its meaning in Adam Smith’s writings remains obscure, particularly the religious associations that were obvious to early readers. He drew on Isaac Newton’s theories of divine action and providence, mediated through the moderate Calvinism of the eighteenth century Scottish circles in which he moved. I argue within the context of Smith’s general providential account (...)
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    Book Review: Brent Waters, Just Capitalism: A Christian Ethic of Economic Globalization. [REVIEW]Paul Oslington - 2018 - Studies in Christian Ethics 31 (2):260-263.
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    Review of Joost Hengstmengel’s Divine Providence in Early Modern Economic Thought. New York, NY: Routledge, 2019, 248 Pp. [REVIEW]Paul Oslington - 2020 - Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 13 (1).
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